Texas

  • September 23, 2022

    Jones Ends Trial Week With Wish Jurors Would Do Research

    Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones told media outside of a Connecticut courthouse Friday morning that if he could speak to jurors in his Sandy Hook defamation trial, he would tell them to "research history," prompting a strong jury instruction from the judge.

  • September 23, 2022

    10 States Back Sen. Graham's Stay Bid In Ga. Election Probe

    Ten states filed an amicus brief in the Eleventh Circuit on Thursday supporting the bid by Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., for a stay of his testimony in a Georgia election fraud investigation until an appeal over the scope of his immunity is resolved.

  • September 23, 2022

    Fla. Senator Sues DeSantis Over $1.5M Paid To Fly Migrants

    Democratic Florida state Sen. Jason Pizzo has sued GOP Gov. Ron DeSantis and administration officials over the constitutionality of using $1.5 million of COVID-19 relief funds to fly migrants from near Texas' southern border to Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts, accusing officials of spending taxpayer money on such programs before certain requirements were met.

  • September 23, 2022

    HONX Creditors Accuse Debtor Of Filing Ch. 11 In Bad Faith

    The official committee of unsecured creditors of a bankrupt Hess Corp. unit told a Texas judge the company's Chapter 11 should be dismissed because it was filed in bad faith with no operations or hope of reorganizing the business.

  • September 23, 2022

    Ch. 11 Cheat Sheet: Compute North Holdings

    Cryptocurrency and blockchain data center provider Compute North Holdings filed for Chapter 11 protection in a Texas bankruptcy court Sept. 22, citing collapsing crypto values, ballooning energy costs, supply chain issues and the loss of two of its data centers to asserted loan defaults.

  • September 23, 2022

    Jury Says LabCorp Owes $272M For Infringing Prenatal Test IP

    A federal jury in Waco, Texas, found on Friday afternoon that LabCorp, one of the largest chains of clinical lab providers in the world, owes more than $272 million to a small Maryland biotech business for willfully infringing a patent covering a method of testing for genetic disorders during pregnancy.

  • September 23, 2022

    Boy Scouts Appeals Roll In, Alex Jones Ch. 11 Attys Nixed

    More than a dozen insurers commenced appeals of the Boy Scouts of America's confirmed Chapter 11 plan, proposed attorneys and advisers in an Alex Jones-linked bankruptcy were disqualified, and talc injury claimants questioned the good faith of Johnson & Johnson's talc unit in filing for bankruptcy. This is the week in bankruptcy.

  • September 23, 2022

    Crypto Data Center Co. Compute North Hits Ch. 11

    Cryptocurrency and blockchain data center provider Compute North Holdings has filed for Chapter 11 protection in a Texas bankruptcy court with nearly $147 million in debt, citing collapsing crypto values and ballooning energy costs.

  • September 22, 2022

    Combative Jones Mostly Denies Harm In Newtown Testimony

    Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones took the stand on Thursday in a damages trial over his false statements about the Sandy Hook massacre in Newtown, Connecticut, sparring with a lawyer for victims' families while at one point acknowledging it "could be" harmful to falsely call bereaved people actors.

  • September 22, 2022

    Vinson & Elkins Guides Talos' $1.1B EnVen Energy Buy

    Vinson & Elkins-led Talos Energy Inc. said Thursday that it has reached a definitive agreement to acquire EnVen Energy Corp., a Houston-based private oil and gas producer that operates in the deep water of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, for $1.1 billion.

  • September 22, 2022

    Texas Justices Mull If Payment To Exoneree Ends His Suit, Too

    Texas' high court debated the meaning of the word "bring" on Thursday as it explored whether payments received by an exoneree under a Lone Star State law for wrongful convictions are tantamount to a settlement in his ongoing civil rights lawsuit against the city of Houston and Harris County.

  • September 22, 2022

    IP Forecast: Tyga's 'Wavy Baby' Shoe Row Goes To 2nd Circ.

    The Second Circuit will consider what constitutes an "expressive" work in trademark law when it hears a controversial designer's appeal of a ruling the Vans footwear brand obtained to temporarily block a shoe line endorsed by the rapper Tyga. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • September 22, 2022

    Texas Ex-Professor Settles Microaggression Critique Suit

    The University of North Texas and a former professor told a Texas federal judge on Thursday that they had settled the professor's lawsuit alleging he was fired for criticizing the concept of microaggressions and refusing to apologize.

  • September 22, 2022

    PTAB Grills Intel, VLSI In Fight Over IP Tied To $2.18B Verdict

    A Patent Trial and Appeal Board panel on Thursday called into question VLSI Technology LLC's $2.18 billion jury win against Intel as it grilled attorneys for both companies over the tech giant's challenge to one of two microchip patents involved in the enormous verdict.

  • September 22, 2022

    Breaking Down The DOJ's American-JetBlue Antitrust Trial

    American Airlines and JetBlue's highly anticipated showdown with the Biden administration in an upcoming antitrust trial stands to affect how intensely competition enforcers scrutinize future airline combinations, code-share agreements and joint ventures. Here, Law360 takes a closer look at the case.

  • September 22, 2022

    Credit Union Manager Indicted On Embezzlement Charges

    A Texas credit union manager has been hit with a federal grand jury indictment for allegedly embezzling more than $211,000 by creating fake loans and moving money from elderly credit union members into the accounts of her relatives and friends.

  • September 22, 2022

    TPC Must Let All Creditors Reject Releases In Ch. 11 Vote

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge Thursday told TPC Group that it can send its Chapter 11 plan to creditors for a vote, so long as the petrochemical maker's unsecured creditors have the option to vote for the plan but opt out of its legal releases.

  • September 22, 2022

    Meet Tesla's New Senior Director Of Legal — Don't Call Her GC

    Despite Tesla CEO Elon Musk's efforts to obfuscate the fact, Dinna Eskin has told a Delaware court that she is, indeed, the new head of Tesla's legal department.

  • September 22, 2022

    Holland & Knight Adds Partner To Public Finance Tax Practice

    Holland & Knight LLP said Wednesday it has strengthened its public finance practice with the addition of a former Hawkins Delafield & Wood LLP partner.

  • September 21, 2022

    Jones' Lies Devastated Sandy Hook Victims, Jury Hears

    Family members of three people killed in the Sandy Hook mass shooting testified Wednesday about the effects on their lives of Alex Jones' smears, with one saying the resulting flood of hateful messages was "swallowing me whole."

  • September 21, 2022

    CFTC Wants Election-Betting Firm's Suit Moved To DC

    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission asked a Texas federal judge on Tuesday to move a suit accusing it of illegally shutting down an election-betting platform to the District of Columbia, arguing that none of the claims in the suit have anything to do with Texas and that the choice to file the case there "was not based on convenience or efficiency."

  • September 21, 2022

    Manchin Unveils Permitting Reform To Reluctant Congress

    Sen. Joe Manchin on Wednesday released his plan for legislation that would ease the permitting process for infrastructure projects like oil and gas pipelines and electricity transmission lines, but it faces an uncertain future in the divided Congress.

  • September 21, 2022

    How Telecom Co. KPN Won A $32M Verdict Against Ericsson

    In a Texas courtroom in August, lawyers for a relatively small Dutch telecom company looked to convince eight jurors that Ericsson, an industry behemoth, deliberately infringed patents for improving how wireless networks transmit signals while fighting Ericsson's argument that the company's patents raised privacy concerns.

  • September 21, 2022

    Texas Supreme Court Mulls $4M Walmart Contract Dispute

    The Texas Supreme Court questioned whether a Conduent Inc. unit should have warned Walmart Inc. about planned maintenance to a system that processes food benefits transactions, asking attorneys Wednesday about Conduent's obligations to the retailer without a contract.

  • September 21, 2022

    Meta Hit With $175M Patent Verdict In Austin

    A federal jury in Austin on Wednesday said Meta Platforms owed almost $175 million to developers of a "walkie-talkie" smartphone app, finding that both Instagram Live and Facebook Live infringed one or more claims in patents issued to the company's founder, a former U.S. Army communications sergeant.

Expert Analysis

  • AML Regulation Of Lawyers Is Imminent And Controversial

    Author Photo

    The U.S. House of Representatives' recently passed National Defense Authorization Act subjects lawyers engaged in certain financial-related activities to anti-money laundering regulation under the Bank Secrecy Act, which could pit lawyers against clients in ways harmful to the rule of law and administration of justice, says Jeremy Glicksman at the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office in New York.

  • Key Adaptations For Law Firms Amid Quiet Quitting Movement

    Author Photo

    While quiet quitting may not be sustainable at law firms with billable hour requirements, there are specific steps law firms should take to maintain engagement and otherwise respond to the trend's underlying message that associates won't spend all their waking hours at work if they don't feel it's worthwhile, says Meredith Kahan at Whiteford Taylor.

  • Creating A Hybrid Work Policy? Be Intentional And Inclusive

    Author Photo

    The pandemic has changed expectations for the future of work forever, and as more employees demand hybrid working options, law firms must develop policies and models that are intentional, inclusive and iterative to lead the industry into the future, says Manar Morales at the Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • OFAC's Tornado Cash Sanctions Create Legal Uncertainty

    Author Photo

    The Office of Foreign Assets Control’s recent sanctioning of digital currency mixing service Tornado Cash may have exceeded the agency’s authority, and has created uncertainty for potential developers of decentralized crypto mixing and privacy enhancing applications about whether such conduct is lawful, say Michael Bresnick and Christopher Boone at Venable.

  • A Law Firm's Guide To Humane Layoffs As Recession Looms

    Author Photo

    Amid warnings of a global recession, law firms should prepare for the possibility of associate layoffs, aiming for an empathetic approach and avoiding common mistakes that make the emotional impact on departing attorneys worse, say Jarrett Green, a wellness consultant, and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Highlights Divide On Ch. 11 Interest Rates

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit’s recent ruling in Pacific Gas and Electric’s Chapter 11 case is the first federal circuit court ruling on post-petition interest rates — an issue that has bedeviled bankruptcy courts and could lead to a circuit split that finds its way to the U.S. Supreme Court, say Seth Kleinman and Miranda Russell at MoFo.

  • Learning From Trump And Bannon Discovery Strategies

    Author Photo

    Court-imposed sanctions on both former President Donald Trump and his former aide Steve Bannon for failing to comply with subpoenas illustrate that efforts to bar the door to valid discovery can quickly escalate, so litigants faced with challenging discovery disputes should adopt a pragmatic approach, say Mathea Bulander and Monica McCarroll at Redgrave.

  • Why FLSA Settlement Reviews May Be Increasingly Unneeded

    Author Photo

    While most federal courts have followed the Eleventh Circuit's 1982 holding in Lynn's Food v. U.S. that Fair Labor Standards Act claims may be settled only with approval by a court or the U.S. Department of Labor, more courts are beginning to question — or outright challenge — that obligation, say attorneys at Jackson Lewis.

  • The Risks In Lateral Hiring, And How To Avoid Them

    Author Photo

    As law firms increasingly recruit laterals, they must account for ethics rules and other due diligence issues that can turn an inadvisable or careless hire into a nightmare of lost opportunity or disqualification, says Mark Hinderks at Stinson.

  • Ruling Highlights GDPR Best Practices In US Discovery

    Author Photo

    A Texas federal court's recent patent ruling in Arigna v. Nissan shows how U.S. litigants can comply with the European General Data Protection Regulation through proactive communication with opposing counsel, timely production and arguments against disclosures, all while continuing to protect sensitive information, say attorneys at Finnegan.

  • Judges Who Use Social Media Must Know Their Ethical Limits

    Author Photo

    While the judiciary is permitted to use electronic social media, judges and judicial candidates should protect themselves from accusations of ethics violations by studying the growing body of ethics opinions and disciplinary cases centering on who judges connect with and how they behave online, says Justice Daniel Crothers at the North Dakota Supreme Court.

  • Rebuttal

    Courts Are Not Shifting On COVID Biz Interruption Stance

    Author Photo

    Although a recent Law360 guest article suggested that the pendulum is about to swing in favor of policyholders seeking business interruption coverage for pandemic-related losses, the larger body of appellate case law — applying the laws of 25 states — continues to find no coverage, say attorneys at Dentons.

  • Rebuttal

    ABA Is Defending Profession's Values From Monied Influences

    Author Photo

    A recent Law360 guest article suggested that the American Bar Association ignored new opportunities for the legal industry by opposing nonlawyer ownership of law practices, but any advantages would be outweighed by the constraints nonlawyer owners could place on the independence that lawyers require to act in the best interest of their clients, says Stephen Younger at Foley Hoag.

  • Where States Stand On The Legality Of Abortion

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    In light of Indiana recently joining 19 other states in criminalizing abortion prior to viability, Amanda Zablocki and Mikela Sutrina at Sheppard Mullin review the current slate of state abortion laws and their broader implications.

  • How In-House Counsel Can Better Manage Litigation Exposure

    Author Photo

    In anticipation of economic downturn and increased litigation volume, the true struggle for an in-house team is allocating their very limited and valuable attentional resources, but the solution is building systems that focus attention where it can be most effective in delivering better outcomes, say Jaron Luttich and Sean Kennedy at Element Standard.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!