Illinois

  • December 8, 2017

    The Law Firms Of The 2017 MVPs

    Law360's MVP award goes to attorneys who have distinguished themselves from their peers in litigation, deals and other complex matters. Find the MVPs at your firm here.

  • December 8, 2017

    Law360 MVP Awards Go To Top Attorneys From 78 Firms

    The elite slate of attorneys chosen as Law360’s 2017 MVPs have distinguished themselves from their peers by securing hard-earned successes in high-stakes litigation, complex global matters and record-breaking deals.

  • December 8, 2017

    Travelers Can't Ditch Defense Coverage Suit Over PCB Claims

    Travelers Indemnity Co. can’t shut down a potentially billion-dollar coverage dispute with Magnetek Inc. just because the plaintiff failed to add another company as a defendant, an Illinois federal court ruled Thursday, meaning the insurer will have to win on the merits to avoid being drawn into an underlying suit by Monsanto Co.

  • December 8, 2017

    Nucap Loses Bid To Depose Bosch Chairman In Brake IP Fight

    Nucap Industries Inc. can’t depose Robert Bosch GmbH’s chairman in a lawsuit over Bosch’s alleged theft of brake design components since there’s no evidence he’s involved in the issues at hand, an Illinois federal magistrate judge said Thursday.

  • December 8, 2017

    3 Attys OK'd To Lead Dairy Price-Fixing Class Action

    An Illinois federal judge has given three attorneys from Barrett Law Group PA, NastLaw LLC and Roberts Law Firm PA the green light to lead a consumer class action alleging that a now-canceled program to slaughter milk cows resulted in illegal price-fixing for dairy products.

  • December 8, 2017

    Ex-Air Force Worker Admits Giving Bidders Contract Info

    A former U.S. Air Force employee pled guilty Thursday in Illinois federal court to allegations he accepted meals and baseball tickets and passed on confidential project pricing information to companies bidding on contracts at his base, information the U.S. Department of Justice said was used to secure work.

  • December 8, 2017

    Mayors Urge FCC To Keep Net Neutrality Rules

    Nearly 60 elected municipal officials from coast to coast, including the mayors of New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago and Boston, asked the Federal Communications Commission in a Thursday letter to preserve its Obama-era net neutrality rules.

  • December 8, 2017

    Dunkin’ Can't Escape Suit Over Faux Berry Doughnuts

    An Illinois federal judge on Thursday allowed a Dunkin’ Donuts customer to go forward with his claim the chain duped him into buying an artificially flavored blueberry doughnut believing it contained real berries, saying if his claims are true it was a reasonable belief.

  • December 7, 2017

    Some State, Local Cellphone Taxes Could Top 40%: Report

    The taxes, fees and surcharges that are tacked onto monthly cellphone bills will hit record levels next year, the Tax Foundation said Thursday, as impending increases could push the tax bite on a typical family plan to as high as 40 percent of the total bill in some locations.

  • December 7, 2017

    VA Hospital Failed To Diagnose Heart Condition, Suit Says

    The spouse of a U.S. Marine Corps. veteran who died in the care of a Veterans Affairs medical facility hit the government with a lawsuit Wednesday in Illinois federal court, alleging physicians at the facility failed to adequately test and treat his deteriorating cardiovascular condition.

  • December 7, 2017

    Real Estate Rumors: WeWork, Allegro, ShopOne

    WeWork is reportedly close to a deal to lease two floors in Chicago, Allegro Senior Living is said to have landed a $44.5 million loan for a senior living project in Florida, and ShopOne Centers REIT has reportedly picked up a New Jersey grocery-anchored shopping center for $26.5 million.

  • December 7, 2017

    Writer Says 'Gone Girl' Infringes Her Screenplay

    A Nevada writer on Wednesday filed suit in Illinois federal court against the writer of the bestselling thriller "Gone Girl" and the producers of the 2014 hit movie, saying the novel was ripped off of her own unproduced screenplay.

  • December 7, 2017

    7th Circ. Affirms AmEx’s ‘Flawed’ $6.7M Gift Card Deal

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday affirmed the dismissal of an objection to American Express’ $6.7 million settlement ending claims that AmEx's prepaid gift cards don't work universally, finding that a district judge didn't abuse his discretion in approving it, even though it said the deal is “flawed” and consumers are getting meager recoveries.

  • December 7, 2017

    Jones Day Picks Up Dykema Cybersecurity Partner

    Jones Day has picked up a Dykema Gossett PLC partner for its cybersecurity and privacy practice in Chicago, citing his “deep experience in incidence response and European data privacy compliance.”

  • December 7, 2017

    Fed. Reform Means Scores Of Tax Decisions Await States

    A swift march toward tax reform by the U.S. Congress means state legislatures, which gavel in next month, will be faced with responding to a giant overhaul of the federal tax code.

  • December 6, 2017

    JPML Sends Opioid MDL To Northern Ohio

    The wave of lawsuits filed by local governments in the wake of the opioid addiction crisis will be centralized in the Northern District of Ohio, the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation said Tuesday.

  • December 6, 2017

    Mandated Mental Health Exams Were Valid, 7th Circ. Says

    Mandatory mental health examinations for a former Illinois Department of Transportation employee were necessary for the safety of her coworkers and not discriminatory, a Seventh Circuit panel ruled on Wednesday, affirming a lower court’s decision.

  • December 6, 2017

    Real Estate Rumors: Morton Williams, CIM, Cornell Realty

    Morton Williams Supermarkets is reportedly leasing more than 29,000 square feet in New York, a CIM venture is said to have bought a Chicago apartment tower, and Cornell Realty Management has reportedly scored a $15 million bridge loan for a Brooklyn condo tower project.

  • December 6, 2017

    Campus Assault Book Is Protected Opinion: HarperCollins

    HarperCollins Publishers LLC on Wednesday urged an Illinois federal judge to toss a graduate student’s defamation and invasion of privacy suit against the company and the author of a book on campus sexual assault, saying the student can’t lob such allegations against them because the passages about her are the author’s constitutionally protected opinion.

  • December 6, 2017

    Opioid Suits Are The New Tobacco Litigation, Atty Says

    The litigation coming out of the opioid crisis will rival the tobacco suits of the 1990s, Jay Edelson of plaintiffs firm Edelson PC told an audience during a Chicago City Club panel on the drugs and possible solutions to the epidemic of addiction.

Expert Analysis

  • The Most Noteworthy Class Action Developments Of 2017

    Neal Marder

    This year has seen significant developments in the field of class action litigation. The impact of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Spokeo decision continued to work its way through the courts, the appeals courts have made strides on issues like ascertainability and standing to pursue injunctive relief, and Congress is considering legislation that would alter the class action landscape, say attorneys with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.

  • How DOE's 'Grid Resiliency' Policy May Impact Gas Markets

    Chip Moldenhauer

    At the behest of the U.S. Department of Energy, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is soon expected to release an interim rule that subsidizes power plants that hold 90 days of fuel supply on site — i.e., coal-fired and nuclear plants — and effectively penalizes gas-fired plants. But FERC has an opportunity to mitigate the threat to gas-fired generators, says Chip Moldenhaeur of LawIQ.

  • The Intersection Of Arbitration And Choice-Of-Law Clauses

    Rachel Mongiello

    Clients on the verge of litigation with a contractual counterparty often furnish their attorneys with the negotiated contract containing a mandatory arbitration provision and choice-of-law clause. But an often overlooked question is whether the Federal Arbitration Act or the parties’ chosen law governs the arbitration itself, says Rachel Mongiello of Cole Schotz PC.

  • MDL Hearing Signals A New Phase For Opioid Suits

    Adam Fleischer

    On Nov. 30, the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation heard argument in over 100 government lawsuits seeking damages from pharmaceutical companies for the opioid epidemic. Whether these cases get consolidated and, if so, in which court, may have far-reaching implications, say Adam Fleischer and Kevin Harris of BatesCarey LLP.

  • Insights On Article III Standing Under Ill. Biometrics Law

    Molly DiRago

    Last week the Second Circuit, in Santana v. Take-Two Interactive Software, affirmed the lower court’s decision that the plaintiffs lacked Article III standing to assert a claim under Illinois’ Biometric Information Protection Act, creating an apparent divide between plaintiffs who have voluntarily provided their biometric data and those who have not, say Molly DiRago and Mark Mao of Troutman Sanders LLP.

  • 10 Tips For Effective Practice Before The 5th Circ.

    Justin Woodard

    The Fifth Circuit is among the busiest federal circuit courts in the country. What can you do to increase your chances of reaching oral argument? And if given the opportunity, how can you present a persuasive argument? Former Fifth Circuit clerk Justin Woodard, an associate at Jones Walker LLP, shares some advice.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Saris Reviews 'Locking Up Our Own'

    Judge Patti Saris

    Having just completed a six-year term as chair of the U.S. Sentencing Commission, I read Yale Law School professor James Forman's new book, "Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America," with particular interest, says Judge Patti Saris, chief judge for the U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts.

  • Why Asking About Salary History Is Risky Anywhere

    Joseph Kroeger

    Recently there has been significant attention around new laws and ordinances that prohibit employers from asking job applicants about their salary history in various U.S. states and cities. But are employers outside of these jurisdictions free to ask for salary history information of applicants without risk? Hardly, say Joseph Kroeger and Audrey Roberts of Snell & Wilmer LLP.

  • Dissecting NAIC's Insurance Data Security Model Law

    Lawrence Hamilton

    On the heels of the new Insurance Data Security Model Law recently adopted by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, members of Mayer Brown explain the new law, its substantive requirements, and the takeaways for the insurance industry.

  • The Broad Reach Of Medicare Act’s Preemption Provision

    Jeffrey Bushofsky

    When defending claims involving Medicare, it is important to consider whether they may be preempted by state or local laws. An Illinois federal court's recent decision in Mayberry v. Walgreens highlights just how far Medicare preemption can reach, say attorneys with Ropes & Gray LLP.