Illinois

  • January 11, 2021

    Becton Buyers Defend Revived Antitrust Suit

    Health care providers urged an Illinois federal court not to toss their revived antitrust claims against Becton Dickinson & Co., saying calls from the medical equipment giant to again dismiss the case from Marion HealthCare LLC and Marion Diagnostic Center LLC misrepresented the Seventh Circuit's directions.    

  • January 11, 2021

    Justices Won't Hear Wisconsin Drivers' OT Exemption Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a bid by Wisconsin truck drivers to revive their Fair Labor Standards Act class claims in a case examining whether short-haul drivers were part of the chain of interstate commerce and exempt from overtime pay.

  • January 11, 2021

    Rival Escapes $345M Asset Freeze In Motorola Suit

    An appeals court set aside on Monday a $345 million freezing order won by Motorola in London to satisfy a U.S. judgment against Hytera, a rival radio manufacturer, for trade secret theft, saying it was based on inadmissible evidence of alleged threats made during settlement talks.

  • January 10, 2021

    Top 5 Criminal Justice Reforms Advocates Want Under Biden

    Joe Biden's election as president has sparked hope among criminal justice advocates and organizations that his administration will overhaul the U.S. criminal justice system and implement reforms they have been seeking for years.

  • January 08, 2021

    Ill. Gov. Floats Shedding Virus Aid Tax Provisions To Save $500M

    Decoupling from federal pandemic aid provisions, including those that temporarily suspend the limitation on pass-through businesses' ability to use net operating losses to offset nonbusiness income, would save Illinois $500 million, the state's Democratic governor said Friday.

  • January 08, 2021

    Freeborn & Peters Adds Bankruptcy Partner To Chicago Office

    Freeborn & Peters LLP has hired a former Goldstein & McClintock LLLP bankruptcy attorney experienced in representing complex domestic and international financial restructurings, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • January 08, 2021

    Catering Co. Says Revised Turkey Price-Fix Claims Are OK

    A catering company accusing several turkey producers of conducting an illegal price-fixing scheme urged an Illinois federal judge Thursday to keep revised unjust enrichment claims in its antitrust suit, arguing it fixed the specificity issues that had initially caused them to fail.

  • January 08, 2021

    Real Estate Rumors: CA Ventures, JLL, Target

    CA Ventures has reportedly paid $80 million for a Florida student housing complex, JLL is said to no longer be helping the Trump Organization sell its flagship D.C. hotel and Target is reportedly seeking to build its first store in Homestead, Florida.

  • January 08, 2021

    Taxation With Representation: Wachtell, Cravath, Skadden

    In this week's Taxation With Representation, financial technology lender SoFi is valued at $8.65 billion going public, AmerisourceBergen buys most of Walgreens Boots Alliance's health care business for $6.5 billion, and health insurer Centene acquires Magellan Health.

  • January 08, 2021

    Boeing's Favorable Crash Deal Leaves Victims' Families Livid

    Chalk up a win for the Boeing Co.'s chief legal officer, Brett Perry. Boeing's legal and compliance departments appear to have escaped mostly unscathed in the company's $2.5 billion deferred prosecution agreement.   

  • January 08, 2021

    Contempt Hearing For Ex-Girardi Attys To Be Held In Person

    An Illinois federal judge said Friday he'll wait to hold a contempt hearing for two former Girardi Keese PC attorneys accused of covering up the alleged theft of $2 million in client settlement funds until it's safe enough to have the hearing in person.

  • January 07, 2021

    Ill. Child Sex Abuse Victim Can Sue School 20 Years Later

    An Illinois law setting a 20-year statute of limitations for child sex abuse civil cases is not preempted by the one-year time limit for suits against governmental entities, a state appeals court has ruled in a suit seeking to hold a public school board liable for a woman's injuries.

  • January 07, 2021

    Belden Sued Over Data Breach Affecting Workers

    Networking equipment vendor Belden Inc. is facing an Illinois state court suit claiming the company failed to protect its employees' personal information well enough to prevent a November data breach, which it also took too long to publicly disclose.

  • January 07, 2021

    Ex-Girardi Attys Accused Of Covering Up Settlement Theft

    Two former Girardi Keese attorneys should be held in contempt, Edelson PC attorneys told an Illinois federal judge this week, saying the pair engaged in a cover-up that allowed name partner Tom Girardi to allegedly steal $2 million in settlement funds meant for widows and orphans of plane crash victims.

  • January 07, 2021

    More Than 20 Firms Steered 2020's Largest Hospitality Deals

    More than 20 law firms landed work on the 10 largest hospitality deals of 2020, four of which came in above the $1 billion mark.

  • January 07, 2021

    Coronavirus Litigation: The Week In Review

    Enterprise can't shake WARN Act liability over coronavirus layoffs, LA Fitness says its landlord can't demand full rent when the gym operator was prohibited from using its rented space, and the owners of the Philadelphia Union soccer team are among the latest to take their insurer to court over denied coverage for losses related to the pandemic.

  • January 07, 2021

    7th Circ. Revives Black Cop's Bias Suit Against VA

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday revived a Black police officer's lawsuit claiming he was disciplined too harshly after being accused of sexual harassment because a white officer in a similar situation faced lighter punishment.

  • January 07, 2021

    Boeing To Pay More Than $2.5B Over 737 Max Fraud

    The Boeing Co. agreed Thursday to pay more than $2.5 billion to settle a conspiracy claim brought by the U.S. Department of Justice in Texas federal court accusing the airplane manufacturer's employees of hiding information from the Federal Aviation Administration about the safety of its 737 Max jets.

  • January 07, 2021

    Electronics Recycler Accused Of Unlawful Facial Scans In Ill.

    A California-based electronics recycler has been hit with proposed class claims in Illinois state court alleging its self-serve kiosks, found at retailers including Walmart and Kroger, unlawfully scan users' faces for identity authentication without first obtaining their informed consent.

  • January 07, 2021

    Ill. Chocolate Supplier Hit With Biometric Privacy Claims

    The largest cocoa processor and ingredient chocolate supplier in North America faces putative class claims that it violated Illinois' landmark biometric privacy law by requiring workers to scan their fingerprints to clock in and out of work without first getting written permission and making required disclosures.

  • January 06, 2021

    Medical Marijuana Investor Suit Punted Back To Trial Court

    An Illinois appellate court has rebooted a case against a medical marijuana grower brought by a founding member, finding that there was a legitimate question of whether the company impermissibly used member loans as capital contributions and diluted his shares.

  • January 06, 2021

    Meat Processing BIPA Suit Paused For State Appeals Ruling

    A proposed class action accusing meat processing company West Liberty Foods of breaching Illinois' Biometric Information Privacy Law by collecting employees' fingerprints without getting consent has been paused until a state appeals court decides if such charges are covered by a one-year claims limit.

  • January 06, 2021

    Home Sellers Blast 'Fruitless' Bid To Excise Class Members

    HomeServices of America can't head off discovery with "a premature and fruitless" argument that some of the home sellers suing it and other real estate brokerages over National Association of Realtors commission rules belong in arbitration, the sellers told an Illinois federal judge Tuesday.

  • January 06, 2021

    Outed Atty's 'Deficient' Brief Costs Him Appeal In $26M Suit

    An attorney who claimed a former colleague outed his sexuality to an alleged Al-Qaida combatant client lost his chance to appeal the dismissal of his $26 million lawsuit after the Seventh Circuit blasted his "woefully deficient" brief challenging the decision.

  • January 06, 2021

    Mt. Gox Investors Urge Ill. Judge To Certify $400M Fraud Class

    Customers of defunct Japanese bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox argued Wednesday that an Illinois federal judge should certify a class in their $400 million fraud suit because they share common issues, even if different company statements led them to use the exchange.

Expert Analysis

  • What The Biden Administration Can Expect From State AGs

    Author Photo

    With the nationwide split between Republican and Democratic state attorneys general unchanged post-election, the Biden administration can anticipate challenges to major health care, energy and environmental policy initiatives, continued activity from state solicitors general, and increased consumer protection enforcement, say William Hurd and Christopher Carlson at Troutman Pepper.

  • Perspectives

    Judges On Race: Reducing Implicit Bias In Courtrooms

    Author Photo

    With unconscious biases deeply embedded in the court system, judges must take steps to guard against the power and influence of stereotypes during jury selection, evidence admissibility hearings, bail proceedings and other areas of judicial decision making, says U.S. Circuit Judge Bernice Donald.

  • Where Trump's Environmental Rollbacks Stand: Part 2

    Author Photo

    There are over two dozen Trump-era rules aimed at rolling back environmental protections that still face challenges in federal court — and with every brief filed and oral argument presented by the current administration, it becomes harder for the Biden administration to flip positions and change legal arguments, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Opinion

    US Courts Should Adjudicate FRAND Rates On A Global Basis

    Author Photo

    Following the U.K. Supreme Court's recent Unwired Planet v. Huawei decision, U.S. courts should analyze compliance with contracts on fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory terms by assessing them on a worldwide basis, because global licenses are the only technically and financially sound way to license standard-essential patents, say attorneys at McKool Smith.

  • Where Trump's Environmental Rollbacks Stand: Part 1

    Author Photo

    The Trump administration's ambitious efforts to roll back environmental protections continued to accelerate in 2020, and while the Biden administration will seek to suspend, revoke or replace many Trump policies, its ability to do so will depend on the status of the regulations in question, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Navigating Atty Relationship Conflicts That May Imperil Cases

    Author Photo

    In light of recent American Bar Association guidance on conflicts of interest posed by social or intimate relationships between opposing counsel, lawyers must carefully consider whether any personal ties could lead to ethics violations that may affect the outcome of a case, say Thomas Wilkinson and Douglas Fox at Cozen O'Connor.

  • The Pandemic's Toll On Criminal Defendant Rights: Part 2

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at DLA Piper look at how prepandemic precedent affords courts substantial discretion to limit criminal defendants' constitutional rights to confront witnesses and to receive a speedy trial during the COVID-19 crisis.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: MDL Nostalgia

    Author Photo

    After covering the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation for eight years, Alan Rothman at Sidley looks back at the advent of video hearings during the pandemic and a panel full of U.S. district court judges, as well as the persistent dominance of product liability cases in the panel's docket.

  • How Mediators Can Help Parties Overcome Emotional Barriers

    Author Photo

    Litigants' emotions can doom the prospects for settlement during mediation, so listening with empathy and helping parties look at a case less emotionally are important tools in a mediator's kit, says Sidney Schenkier at JAMS.

  • The State Of Consumer Class Actions Amid COVID-19

    Author Photo

    While the pandemic has slowed the filing of consumer class actions, they remain a significant part of the litigation landscape — with false labeling claims remaining particularly popular, likely because they are easy to file and frequently survive motions to dismiss, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wardlaw Reviews 'Hamilton And The Law'

    Author Photo

    Lisa Tucker's collection of essays, "Hamilton and the Law: Reading Today's Most Contentious Legal Issues Through the Hit Musical," has the seemingly incongruous effect of drawing the reader into America's formative history while also contemplating the intractable issues facing us today, including racial justice, immigration and gender equality, says Ninth Circuit Judge Kim Wardlaw.

  • 7 Tips For Predeposition Meetings Under New Federal Rule

    Author Photo

    Attorneys can use a new predeposition meet-and-confer obligation for federal litigation — taking effect Tuesday — to better understand and narrow the topics of planned testimony, and more clearly outline the scope of any discovery disputes, says James Wagstaffe at Wagstaffe von Loewenfeldt Busch.

  • What Biden Presidency May Mean For Data Privacy Litigation

    Author Photo

    The administration of President-elect Joe Biden will likely bring major changes to data privacy law and attendant litigation, including federal legislation that could preempt state laws, renegotiation of conditions for EU data transfers to the U.S., and increased Federal Trade Commission enforcement activity, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • CFPB Settlement Shows Common FCRA Compliance Flaws

    Author Photo

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s recent settlement with debt collector Afni underscores the agency’s ongoing interest in recurring Fair Credit Reporting Act compliance errors related to computer glitches, response deadlines and first delinquency dates, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Ethics Reminders As Employees Move To Or From Gov't

    Author Photo

    Many organizations are making plans for executives to go into government jobs, or for government officials to join a private sector team, but they must understand the many ethics rules that can put a damper on just how valuable the former employee or new hire can be, say Scott Thomas and Jennifer Carrier at Blank Rome.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Illinois archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!