Massachusetts

  • September 15, 2021

    Man Can't Sue IRS Over Crypto Exchange Docs, 1st Circ. Told

    A New Hampshire man's efforts to block the Internal Revenue Service from obtaining his records from cryptocurrency platforms are barred by federal law prohibiting suits that could restrain tax collection, the U.S. told the First Circuit.

  • September 15, 2021

    Jury Hears 'Varsity Blues' Dad Wanted '2-For-1' Fraud Special

    A hedge fund founder asked the ringleader of the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scheme whether he could get a "two-for-one special" to get his twin daughters into college through a "side door," a Boston jury heard on tape Wednesday.

  • September 15, 2021

    Former Mass. Ethics Chair Gets 15 Mos. For Fraud Spree

    A former Massachusetts lawmaker who chaired the state's House Ethics Committee was sentenced Wednesday to 15 months in prison for stealing campaign funds, lying to banks for loans and filing false tax returns.

  • September 15, 2021

    Truly Seltzer Owner Hit With Investor Suit Over Sales Slump

    The beverage company behind Truly Hard Seltzer and Samuel Adams was hit with a proposed securities class action in Manhattan federal court Tuesday alleging it hid declining hard seltzer sales to artificially pump up stock prices.

  • September 14, 2021

    Warren Says Fed Must Break Up 'Irredeemable' Wells Fargo

    Sen. Elizabeth Warren has called for the Federal Reserve to break up Wells Fargo in the wake of its latest run-in with regulators, pressuring Fed Chairman Jerome Powell to flex some enforcement muscle as the Biden administration considers whether to keep him for a second term.

  • September 14, 2021

    Ex-Mass. Mayor Fighting Corruption Conviction Seeks 3 Years

    A 29-year-old former Massachusetts mayor who continues to dispute a corruption conviction handed down in May has pushed back on federal prosecutors' bid for an 11-year prison term, arguing that far worse corruption cases have yielded far less prison time and that three years is long enough.

  • September 14, 2021

    Attorney Tells 1st Circ. His Sex Bias Suit Belongs In Court

    An attorney who lodged a sex discrimination lawsuit against Preti Flaherty Beliveau and Pachios LLP claiming he was fired for taking parental leave told the First Circuit that a lower court relied on outdated case law and exceeded its authority when it sent his case to arbitration.

  • September 14, 2021

    Biden Picks For Wash., Mass. Trial Court Seats Clear Senate

    A pair of President Joe Biden's choices for the federal trial bench in Washington state and Massachusetts easily won Senate confirmation Tuesday.

  • September 14, 2021

    Uber Aims To Slash 'Piggyback' Investor Claims In IPO Suit

    Uber has asked a California federal judge to slash a consolidated proposed class action alleging the ride-hailing giant duped shareholders about numerous corporate scandals and downplayed risks ahead of its May 2019 initial public offering, saying certain investors can't "piggyback" on this suit.

  • September 14, 2021

    'Varsity Blues' Jury Hears BigLaw Atty's Deal With Mastermind

    "Varsity Blues" prosecutors on Tuesday began building their case that two parents bribed their children's way into elite colleges, playing tapes for a Boston federal jury on which the former co-chair of Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP and other defendants not on trial were recorded striking shady "side door" deals with the scheme's ringleader.

  • September 14, 2021

    Ex-EBay Execs Tell Judge Docs Undermine Stalking Case

    A pair of eBay Inc. security executives fired in the wake of a cyberstalking scheme pressed a Boston federal judge Tuesday for access to government files they say will aid their defense against criminal charges.

  • September 14, 2021

    Pot Co. Prez Wants Out Of 'Borat' Actor's Copyright Suit

    The president of cannabis company Solar Therapuetics Inc. has asked to be dismissed from a copyright infringement suit brought against him and the company by "Borat" actor Sacha Baron Cohen for allegedly putting an image of the Borat character on a billboard without permission.

  • September 14, 2021

    Mass. AG Investigating T-Mobile After Massive Data Breach

    Massachusetts is investigating T-Mobile to determine if the telecom giant had the "proper safeguards" in place leading up to a massive July customer data breach that exposed the data of at least 53 million people, the state's attorney general said Tuesday.

  • September 14, 2021

    These Firms Have The Most Women In Equity Partnerships

    Many law firms are seeing only modest progress as they seek to close the gender gap in their top ranks. But these firms are working to shake up that reality and forging a path to progress.

  • September 14, 2021

    Manatt Grows Boston Office With 'Varsity Blues' Prosecutor

    A government attorney involved in the "Varsity Blues" case has stopped prosecuting the "side door" for college admissions and stepped through the revolving door to a partner gig at Manatt Phelps & Phillips, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • September 13, 2021

    Playwright Wins 1st Circ. IP Appeal Over Novel Adaptations

    The First Circuit on Monday reversed a decision that cut a Puerto Rican playwright out of the equation when considering who owns copyrights to theatrical adaptations that were published without permission, finding Monday that a judge's pretrial error "regrettably fundamentally altered" the case's course and that the playwright is entitled to a six-figure verdict.

  • September 13, 2021

    7 Companies To Join September Blitz With IPOs Topping $2.8B

    Seven companies joined a robust initial public offerings pipeline on Monday, setting price ranges for new issuances that could exceed $2.8 billion, indicating that the IPO market should remain humming through at least the end of September.

  • September 13, 2021

    FDA Asks Full DC Circ. To Consider Electric Shock Device Ban

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is urging the full D.C. Circuit bench to reinstate its ban on the use of electric shock harnesses as a treatment to deter people with intellectual or developmental disabilities from exhibiting aggressive or self-injuring behavior, saying a panel's July ruling overturning the prohibition undercuts the agency's authority. 

  • September 13, 2021

    Belichick's Girlfriend Backs Leniency For Shoe Co. Embezzler

    A former Alden Shoe Co. executive who admitted stealing $30 million from the business has argued for a lenient prison sentence, backing his request with letters from more than a dozen supporters including Linda Holliday, the longtime girlfriend of New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick.

  • September 13, 2021

    Fishing Groups Challenge Biden Offshore Wind Approvals

    A coalition of fishing industry groups on Monday told the First Circuit the Biden administration hastily approved a commercial wind farm off the coast of Martha's Vineyard, despite what it said were considerable environmental and economic concerns.

  • September 13, 2021

    Purdue Pharma Gets OK For $7.1M In Exec Incentives

    A New York bankruptcy judge gave Purdue Pharma permission Monday to make incentive payments of up to $7.1 million to its top executives, rejecting arguments that the executives had not done enough to clean up the company's corporate culture.

  • September 13, 2021

    'Dedicated Docket' May Overwhelm Immigration Courts

    Thousands of individual asylum seekers' cases were sent to the "dedicated docket" process in August, a Syracuse University research organization reported Monday, raising concerns that the influx could overwhelm the immigration courts and delay justice for migrant families seeking protection.

  • September 13, 2021

    Pot Co. Jushi Slashes Price For Mass. Operator By $9M

    Multistate cannabis operator Jushi Holdings Inc. said Monday it's closed on a deal for a Massachusetts marijuana dispensing company after renegotiating a nearly $9 million discount from the original $110 million maximum deal price.

  • September 13, 2021

    'Varsity Blues' Parents Blame 'Con Man' As 1st Trial Opens

    The first trial in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case kicked off in a Boston federal courtroom Monday with jurors hearing dueling accounts about payments by parents that were either bribes to get their kids into college or innocent donations made at the behest of the "skilled con man" at the center of the scheme.

  • September 13, 2021

    Law360's Glass Ceiling Report: What You Need To Know

    Law firms are facing renewed calls to step up their efforts on equity and inclusion. But when it comes to closing the gender gap, law firms still have a long way to go, our annual survey shows.

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Effective Ways To Prioritize Client Advocacy

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    To truly support a client going through a complicated lawsuit or a painful experience, lawyers must think beyond interpreting legal guidelines and navigating court proceedings, says attorney Scott Corwin.

  • Alcohol Law Changes Test Public Policy Balance

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    Pandemic-era temporary changes to alcohol laws aimed at helping bars and restaurants are maturing into long-term legislative reforms that are testing the extent to which states can obtain a policy balance between modern convenience and the safe, moderate consumption of alcohol, say Arielle Albert and Brian Fink at Danow McMullan.

  • Remote Law Firm Culture Should Prioritize Associate Training

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    Due to the pandemic, the gap between law school and the first day on the job has never been wider, but law firms can leverage training to bridge that intimidating gap and convey the unique value of their culture in a virtual environment, say Melissa Schwind at Ward and Smith, and William Kenney and Jaron Luttich at Element Standard.

  • Alcohol Taxation Provides Good Model For Cannabis Taxes

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    Although the alcohol taxation system isn't perfect, it could serve as a useful template for cannabis taxation with a three-tier licensing scheme and tax rates based on potency, says Louis Terminello at Greenspoon Marder.

  • Virtual Litigation May Unravel The Narcissistic Lawyer

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    The virtual courtroom limits a narcissistic lawyer's ability to intimidate witnesses and opposing counsel, boast to clients or engage in grandstanding — an unexpected benefit of the global pandemic as some aspects of remote litigation are likely here to stay, says Jennifer Gibbs at Zelle.

  • Federal COVID-19 Insurance Decisions Ignore State Law

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    Federal courts are dismissing policyholder lawsuits seeking business insurance coverage for losses from COVID-19 lockdowns at a far higher rate than state courts, likely because they are not following the Erie doctrine, which requires them to apply state law, says Carl Salisbury at Bramnick Rodriguez.

  • ABA Remote Work Guide Raises Bar For Atty Tech Know-How

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    A recent American Bar Association opinion on lawyers' ethical duties of competence and confidentiality when working remotely should be viewed as part of a larger movement by which attorneys are being exhorted to develop competence in 21st century technology, say Jennifer Goldsmith at Ironshore and Barry Temkin at Mound Cotton.

  • Lateral Hire Conflict Screening Lessons From DLA Piper Case

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    While a Texas federal court recently denied a motion to disqualify DLA Piper from representing Apple in a patent dispute after the law firm hired an attorney who formerly represented opponent Maxwell, the case is a reminder that robust conflict checks during lateral hiring can save firms the time and expense of defending disqualification motions, says Hope Comisky at Griesing Law.

  • 3 Cybersecurity Questions To Ask Before A Remote Mediation

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    Lawyers preparing to mediate or arbitrate a case through videoconference should take steps to ensure they and their alternative dispute resolution providers are employing reasonable security precautions to protect digital client data and conform to confidentiality obligations, say F. Keith Brown and Michael Koss at ADR Systems.

  • Expect Aggressive Health Care Scrutiny From Mass. US Atty

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    As we await a new presidentially appointed U.S. attorney for Massachusetts, health business leaders and in-house counsel should reexamine their compliance structures, as the office will likely continue to prioritize enforcement efforts against both traditional areas of focus and pandemic-related fraud, say Jack Pirozzolo and Doreen Rachal at Sidley.

  • A Uniform Mediation Act Primer As States Continue Adoption

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    With Georgia expected to soon become the 13th jurisdiction to adopt the Uniform Mediation Act and with more states likely to follow suit amid widespread trial delays, practitioners should familiarize themselves with the act's conflict disclosure requirements and the boundaries of its confidentiality provisions, says Richard Mason at MasonADR.

  • Safeguarding Privileged Communications In A Remote World

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    With the pandemic ushering in remote collaboration tools, counsel must revisit fundamentals of the attorney-client privilege and the work-product doctrine, study cases involving email and other recent technologies, and follow 10 best practices to protect confidentiality, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • When Federal Courts Remand Eviction Actions Back To States

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    Bruce Falby and Paul Lewis at DLA Piper explore a recent trend of federal courts declining to adjudicate eviction cases removed from state court, even where there is diversity jurisdiction — and its implications for commercial tenants and landlords.

  • 4 Areas Of Cyberattack Vulnerability For Law Firms

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    Recent data breaches involving Goodwin and Jones Day show that cyberattacks are very real threats to the legal profession, especially in the era of remote work, so law firms should revisit common business practices that expose them to unnecessary risks, says Ara Aslanian at Inverselogic.

  • How To Help Your Witnesses Overcome Hindsight Bias

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    Witnesses facing tricky questions from opposing counsel often find themselves engaging in hindsight bias, when they use present knowledge to second-guess past actions, but these problematic thought processes can be overcome during deposition or trial preparation through tough questions and some catharsis, says Merrie Jo Pitera at Litigation Insights.

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