Massachusetts

  • September 20, 2021

    Ex-Mayor Gets Some Convictions Nixed In Corruption Case

    A Massachusetts federal judge has tossed eight of a former mayor's 21 convictions for fraud and corruption, finding Monday that prosecutors had not proven some of the politician's crimes involved interstate commerce or that he willfully lied on his taxes.

  • September 20, 2021

    USC Admin Felt 'Betrayed' By 'Varsity Blues' Ploy, Jury Hears

    A University of Southern California administrator told a Boston jury Monday she felt "truly betrayed" when she discovered that a co-worker in the athletics department and others had convinced her to sign off on admitting students to the elite school on the basis of fake sports credentials.

  • September 20, 2021

    No 'Bad Faith' To Justify Fee Award In Docs Suit, Biogen Says

    Biogen has told the Delaware Chancery Court it should reject a fee bid by firms representing an investor who claimed the company used "glaringly egregious" tactics aimed at driving up the cost of litigation after he sued to access records, saying "bad faith" hasn't been shown.

  • September 20, 2021

    Oil Cos. Ask 1st Circ. To Put Climate Fight In Federal Court

    A group of oil companies has told the First Circuit that a suit from Rhode Island alleging they concealed their role in climate change belongs in federal court, saying the case hinges on whether their operations caused pollution across state and country lines, putting it beyond the scope of one state's legal system.

  • September 20, 2021

    Harvard Sues Insurer For Legal Fees In Affirmative Action Suit

    Harvard University sued Zurich American Insurance Co. for excess coverage of costs it incurred fighting a lawsuit challenging its affirmative action policies, saying the insurer wrongly denied coverage on the basis that it didn't get a timely notice of the suit.

  • September 20, 2021

    Ropes & Gray-Led Lab Space Provider Lands $250M Series B

    Represented by Ropes & Gray LLP, SmartLabs, a business that rents out customizable laboratory space, said Monday it closed on $250 million in a Series B funding round that included ArrowMark Partners, Winslow Capital Management and Onex Falcon.

  • September 20, 2021

    Mintz, Kirkland Aid As PE Shop Buys $3B Semiconductor Biz

    Brooks Automation, represented by Mintz Levin, will forgo its plan to split into two separate publicly traded entities and has instead agreed to sell its semiconductor business to Kirkland-advised private equity firm Thomas H. Lee Partners for $3 billion, the companies said Monday.

  • September 17, 2021

    'Varsity Blues' Jury Hears USC Hoops Recruit Had JV Talent

    A student whose father allegedly bribed his daughter's way into the University of Southern California as a fake basketball recruit was in fact not even good enough to play on her high school's varsity team, jurors in the first "Varsity Blues" trial heard Friday.

  • September 17, 2021

    Prosecutors Urge High Court To Consider Injection Site Case

    Eighty current and former prosecutors and law enforcement leaders on Friday lodged an amicus brief in the U.S. Supreme Court backing efforts to open the country's first overdose prevention site, with President Joe Biden's nominee for Massachusetts U.S. Attorney and the Los Angeles County district attorney among notable signatories.

  • September 17, 2021

    Boston Cannabis Board's Former GC Joins Prince Lobel

    The Boston Cannabis Board's former general counsel has gone back to her roots as a real estate development attorney and is joining Prince Lobel Tye LLP, where she will focus on real estate and alcohol licensing, but also lend her expertise in cannabis matters.

  • September 17, 2021

    Health Hires: Holland & Knight, Arnall Golden Gregory

    Holland & Knight LLP has snapped up an Akerman LLP partner in New York, while Arnall Golden Gregory LLP has built out its D.C. presence with a new health law litigator, headlining Law360's latest roundup of personnel moves in the health care and life sciences arena.

  • September 17, 2021

    CVS Says NY Online Pharmacy Can't Enforce Noncompete

    CVS Pharmacy Inc. hit online pharmacy retailer Capital Rx Inc. with a suit Thursday in Massachusetts federal court claiming the web-based business is trying to keep a former employee from working for CVS in violation of the Bay State's 2018 noncompete reform law.

  • September 16, 2021

    Eateries Can't Claim 'Physical Loss' From Virus, Judge Says

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Thursday joined the "national trend in decisions" holding that the novel coronavirus did not render buildings physically damaged, ruling against a hospitality group seeking coverage for pandemic losses.

  • September 16, 2021

    Fed To Review Trading Rules For Officials After Backlash

    The Federal Reserve said Thursday it will examine and make potential changes to the ethics rules governing the financial holdings and activities of its senior officials, a move that follows scrutiny surrounding investments made by the presidents of its Boston and Dallas regional banks.

  • September 16, 2021

    Pa. AG Says DAs Can't Sue To Stop $26B Opioid Settlement

    The district attorneys for Pennsylvania's two biggest cities lack the authority or standing to sue the state attorney general's office over a $26 billion multistate settlement with opioid companies, the attorney general's office told a state appellate court.

  • September 16, 2021

    Judge Erred By Nixing $3M From Verdict, 1st Circ. Finds

    The First Circuit has found that a Puerto Rico magistrate judge was wrong to cut $3 million from the verdict in a suit over whether a hospital caused a child's brain damage during his birth based on arguments the hospital hadn't made, sending the case back to the district court to reassess the damages. 

  • September 16, 2021

    US Trustee To Appeal Sackler Releases In Purdue Ch. 11

    The U.S. Trustee's Office has told a New York bankruptcy judge it will appeal his order approving Purdue Pharma's Chapter 11 plan, saying the plan's liability releases for Purdue's Sackler family now-former owners go beyond the law and undermine confidence in the system.

  • September 16, 2021

    'Roaring Kitty' Ex-Employer Fined $4M Over GameStop Posts

    A MassMutual investment wing will pay Massachusetts' securities regulator $4 million to resolve claims that it failed to supervise its agents, including Keith Gill, who fomented the trading frenzy around GameStop and other meme stocks under the online persona "Roaring Kitty."

  • September 16, 2021

    1st Circ. Revives Ex-Walmart Greeter's Disability Bias Battle

    The First Circuit reinstated a former Walmart greeter's lawsuit alleging the retail giant sacked her for taking time away to manage an injury she suffered on the job, finding "ambiguous job requirements" and "unclear expectations" supported her case.

  • September 15, 2021

    9 Companies Storm Capital Markets With IPOs Totaling $3B

    A stampede of nine companies spanning industries from enterprise software to running shoes, drive-thru coffee franchises, cancer therapy and other sectors went public Wednesday after raising more than $3 billion combined in initial public offerings.

  • September 15, 2021

    House Dems Seek To Make Fed Curb Fossil Fuel Funding

    House Democrats on Wednesday introduced a bill that would require the Federal Reserve to force the country's largest banks to stop funding fossil fuel projects by 2030.

  • September 15, 2021

    Trade Group Tells 1st Circ. Eateries Not Owed Virus Coverage

    One of the country's largest trade groups representing insurance companies urged the First Circuit on Wednesday to uphold a finding that a group of Massachusetts eateries was not entitled to coverage for losses sustained because of the coronavirus pandemic.

  • September 15, 2021

    Mass. AG Deal Can't Save Philip Morris From $10M Punitives

    The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled Wednesday that the widow of a smoker could keep $10 million in punitive damages she won in a trial against Philip Morris, saying a 1998 settlement involving the state's attorney general doesn't bar the award.

  • September 15, 2021

    1st Circ. Mulls If Whole Foods Workers' BLM View Covers KKK

    Whole Foods workers disciplined for wearing Black Lives Matter masks urged a First Circuit panel Wednesday to revive their race bias case, but one judge wondered if their expansive legal theory might also prevent a hypothetical employer from banning Ku Klux Klan messaging in the workplace.

  • September 15, 2021

    Mass. Offshore Wind Farm Secures $2.3B In Funding

    The developer behind a commercial wind farm off the coast of Martha's Vineyard announce Wednesday that it has raised about $2.3 billion for construction of the project, bringing the so-called Vineyard Wind project a step closer to breaking ground.

Expert Analysis

  • Cannabis Legalization's Effects On Insurance Industry

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Resolution of the legal uncertainty presented by the dueling federal and state approaches to cannabis will pave the way for legal cannabis businesses to access the insurance protections the industry needs for everything from workers' compensation to auto insurance to general liability, says Christy Thiems at the American Property Casualty Insurance Association.

  • 7 Lessons For Young Lawyers Starting Their Careers

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    This year's law graduates and other young attorneys must recognize that the practice of law tests and rewards different skills and characteristics than law school, and that what makes a lawyer valuable changes over time, says Vernon Winters, retired partner at Sidley.

  • COVID Eviction Bans May Not Continue To Survive In Court

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    State and local moratoriums against evictions during the pandemic are likely to withstand plaintiffs' constitutional challenges in the short term, but plaintiffs may start to see more success as time goes on, say attorneys at Goodwin.

  • The Pandemic's Bright Spots For Lawyers Who Are Parents

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    The COVID-19 crisis has allowed lawyers to hone remote advocacy strategies and effectively represent clients with minimal travel — abilities that have benefited working parents and should be utilized long after the pandemic is over, says Chelsea Loughran at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Opinion

    Revise Mansfield Diversity Mandates To Also Benefit Veterans

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    The well-intentioned efforts and salutary purposes of the legal industry's Mansfield Rule diversity metric are tainted by the Diversity Lab initiative's omission of veterans, who are underrepresented at large law firms and entitled to advantageous treatment based on more than 200 years of public policy, says Robert Redmond at McGuireWoods.

  • AGs To Fill Void As Justices Say FTC Can't Impose Restitution

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    State attorneys general are likely to emerge as even more influential consumer protection enforcers, taking the lead in federal-state restitution partnerships, following the U.S. Supreme Court's determination Thursday in AMG Capital v. Federal Trade Commission that the FTC is not authorized to seek equitable monetary relief, say Alissa Gardenswartz and former Sen. Mark Pryor at Brownstein Hyatt.

  • Mich. Pandemic Rent Ruling Is A Critical Win For Tenants

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    A Michigan federal court's well-reasoned decision in Bay City Realty v. Mattress Firm, upholding temporary frustration as a valid defense for failure to pay rent during the pandemic, rejects common commercial landlord arguments and is likely to contribute toward a growing trend of decisions favoring tenants, says Aaron Goodman at Baker McKenzie.

  • Bankruptcy Litigation Could See More Third-Party Funding

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    The next few years could be an opportune time for bankruptcy litigants to capitalize on the advantages of third-party financing as the obstacles to its use — including attorney ethics issues and prohibitions against champerty — seem to be clearing at a slow but steady pace, say Daniel Simon and Natalie Rowles at McDermott.

  • Perspectives

    States Must Factor Race In COVID-19 Vaccine Prioritization

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    In order to ensure equity and efficiency in controlling the pandemic, states should use race as a factor in vaccine prioritization — and U.S. Supreme Court precedent on affirmative action and racial integration offers some guidance on how such policies might hold up in court, say law professors Maya Manian and Seema Mohapatra.

  • Prepare For Global Collaboration In Crypto Tax Enforcement

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    Recent Internal Revenue Service victories involving John Doe summonses served on cryptocurrency exchanges — and statements by the Joint Chiefs of Global Tax Enforcement about global collaboration in cryptocurrency-related tax investigations — should prompt assessment of prior virtual currency transactions and remediation before an enforcement agency shows up at the door, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Why The Future Law Firm Model Is Industry-Based Offerings

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    Multidisciplinary, industry-based groups at law firms allow for more holistic legal advice, lead to sustainable client relationships, and are likely to replace practice group monoliths at many firms, say Jennifer Simpson Carr at Furia Rubel, Timothy Corcoran at Corcoran Consulting and Mike Mellor at Pryor Cashman.

  • Ruling Shows 5th Circ. Reluctant To Second-Guess Agencies

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    The Fifth Circuit's recent opinion in Sierra Club v. U.S. Department of the Interior, declining to overturn a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service ruling allowing impacts to two endangered cat species, confirms the court's deferential standard of review for agency decisions backed by reasonable justification, says Rebecca Barho at Nossaman.

  • Thought Leadership's Critical Role In Law Firm Diversity

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    Minority attorneys are often underrepresented in conferences, media interviews and other law firm thought leadership campaigns, which affects their visibility with potential clients and their ability to advance at their firms, says John Hellerman at Hellerman Communications.

  • Protecting Federal Stimulus Payments From Creditors

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    Unlike the federal stimulus from the CARES Act and the Consolidated Appropriations Act, payments provided under the recently enacted American Rescue Plan Act are not exempt from garnishment by creditors, creating legal and operational challenges for banks that try to protect them, say Lori Sommerfield and John Culhane at Ballard Spahr.

  • What Associates Should Consider Before Switching Practices

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    The current high demand for midlevel associates provides them a rare opportunity to potentially explore new practice areas, but associates should first ask themselves six questions to begin figuring out why a change sounds appealing, says Stephanie Biderman at Major Lindsey.

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