Massachusetts

  • September 02, 2022

    Judge Says Philips Health Monitor Patent Invalid In Fitbit Row

    A Massachusetts federal judge has found that a Philips health monitoring patent was invalid in a dispute with Fitbit, finding the patent-at-issue was too abstract to warrant patent protection.

  • September 02, 2022

    Morrison Mahoney Partner Takes Over As Mass. Bar Prez

    Morrison Mahoney LLP partner Grace V.B. Garcia, the new president of the Massachusetts Bar Association, started her term Sept. 1 with a plan to focus on lawyer wellness and diversity within the bar.

  • September 01, 2022

    Davis Polk, Goodwin Steer $1.1B Novo Nordisk Acquisition

    Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP-led Novo Nordisk will acquire Goodwin Procter LLP-advised Forma Therapeutics Holdings Inc., which develops treatments for sickle cell disease and rare blood disorders, for a total equity value of $1.1 billion, the companies announced Thursday.

  • September 01, 2022

    Maine Pot Org. Seeks Rehearing Of Commerce Clause Ruling

    A Maine-based marijuana trade group is urging the First Circuit to grant an en banc rehearing of a split decision affirming that the U.S. Constitution's dormant commerce clause applied to the federally illegal medical cannabis industry.

  • September 01, 2022

    Real Estate Rumors: AEW Capital, Lux Living, Ed Alberts

    AEW Capital Management has reportedly sold a Manhattan office building for $72 million, Lux Living is said to be in talks with the city of Crestwood, Missouri, regarding a mixed-use project there and investor Ed Alberts is said to have paid $1.5 million for a historic property in Oswego, New York.

  • September 01, 2022

    Burns & Levinson Absorbs 5-Atty Enviro Boutique

    Massachusetts-based firm Burns & Levinson LLP has absorbed all five attorneys from Boston environmental boutique Mackie Shea Durning PC, according to an announcement Thursday.

  • September 01, 2022

    Harvard Professor Can't Undo Conviction In China-Ties Case

    A renowned Harvard University chemistry professor failed to reverse his conviction for lying about his ties to a Chinese research program while cashing in on U.S. grant money, with a federal judge ruling Thursday that there was enough evidence to sustain the jury's verdict.

  • September 01, 2022

    Mass. Investment Adviser Admits Fraud After Earlier SEC Suit

    A Massachusetts investment manager who was previously accused by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission of embezzling funds for personal use was criminally charged with fraud Wednesday and pled guilty.

  • September 01, 2022

    PerkinElmer Says Lab Owes $6M For COVID Test Gear

    A diagnostic lab ignored dozens of invoices and failed to pay PerkinElmer Health Sciences Inc. for more than $6 million worth of COVID-19 testing gear, according to a suit filed Thursday in Massachusetts federal court.

  • September 01, 2022

    Motel 6 Not Liable For Guest's Suicide, Mass. Court Rules

    The Massachusetts Appeals Court on Thursday ruled that Motel 6 and its employees aren't liable for not checking on a man who died by suicide in the hotel, finding that there was no duty in this case for an innkeeper to take preventative steps.

  • August 31, 2022

    BofA, Wells Fargo, TD Bank Can't Duck TelexFree Claims

    Bank of America, Wells Fargo and TD Bank can't avoid claims of aiding and abetting the multibillion-dollar TelexFree Ponzi scheme, a Massachusetts federal judge ordered Wednesday in a ruling that also dropped consulting behemoth PwC and PNC Bank from the civil case.

  • August 31, 2022

    Mass. Taps Former Treasurer As New Top Pot Regulator

    A former state treasurer of Massachusetts and onetime Democratic candidate for governor has been tapped as chair of the state's marijuana regulatory agency, the state Treasury announced Tuesday.

  • August 31, 2022

    1st Circ. Calls Removal Statute 'Hard-Hearted' In Affirming BIA

    The First Circuit was bound Wednesday to stand by an immigration appeals board decision that ordered a Guatemalan man removed from the country despite the hardship it would cause his children, saying the call was in line with the "hard-hearted" and "stringent statutory requirement."

  • August 31, 2022

    Beer Pong Fight Injury Goes On Bar Insurer's Tab, Court Says

    Hospitality Mutual Insurance Co. owes $500,000 to a man who said he was seriously injured in a fight after a beer pong tournament at a sports bar, the Massachusetts Appeals Court ruled Wednesday.

  • August 31, 2022

    Philips To Pay $4M Over Claims It Skirted Military Testing Rule

    Philips North America LLC will pay $4.2 million to settle claims it swapped out key components of a mobile patient monitoring device that it sold to the U.S. military without recertifying the device for airworthiness, allegedly putting top government officials, first responders and the military at risk.

  • August 30, 2022

    Peloton Wins Bid To Arbitrate Members' Sales Tax Claims

    A New York federal judge on Monday said customers suing Peloton over sales tax charges on its monthly subscription plans in four states that don't include such digital goods in their tax bases must arbitrate their claims after finding that the company had not waived its right to arbitration. 

  • August 30, 2022

    FTC, 6 States Sue Roomster Over Phony Listings, Reviews

    The Federal Trade Commission and six states on Tuesday accused online room-listing company Roomster of raking in $27 million from vulnerable consumers who pay to access its platform, despite it being rife with unverified, fake listings that could open up renters to fraud.

  • August 30, 2022

    Garland Bars DOJ Political Appointees From Campaign Events

    U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland on Tuesday ordered all U.S. Department of Justice political appointees to avoid campaign events, a policy shift amid the department's investigation into former President Donald Trump and criticism of the Boston U.S. attorney's attendance at a fundraiser.

  • August 30, 2022

    Keurig Trade Secrets Claim Just 'Rhetoric,' SharkNinja Says

    SharkNinja and a newly hired executive say a trade secrets lawsuit by his former employer Keurig is "chock-full of broad conclusory rhetoric" and fails to show the employee left with proprietary information.

  • August 30, 2022

    Mass. AG Candidate Urged To Reveal Ex-Proskauer Clients

    Massachusetts attorney general candidate and former Proskauer Rose LLP associate Andrea Campbell should publicly reveal who she represented while at the firm, her opponent and employment attorney Shannon Liss-Riordan of Lichten & Liss-Riordan PC said Tuesday a week ahead of the primary election.

  • August 30, 2022

    'Varsity Blues' Legal Issue Delays Ex-USC Official's Sentence

    A former University of Southern California associate athletic director who pled guilty to participating in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scheme convinced the court to delay sentencing until after it determines whether the university was a victim, a ruling she says could undermine the charges.

  • August 30, 2022

    Maine Justices Nix Voters' Block Of $1B Power Line

    Maine's top court on Tuesday said a 2021 voter referendum's blockage of construction of a $1 billion transmission line that would ship Canadian hydropower to New England was unconstitutional, handing a lifeline to the controversial project.

  • August 30, 2022

    Mass. High Court OKs Legislature's 'Broad Powers' On Voting

    Massachusetts' top court on Tuesday explained its reasoning for a July ruling rejecting a Republican challenge to the state's early voting law, finding that the legislature is empowered to expand voting rights equally for all residents.

  • August 29, 2022

    Ex-Calif. Broker Charged With $7M Pump-And-Dump Scheme

    A former stockbroker in California was arrested on charges he artificially inflated the stock price of a beverage company and then dumped millions of microcap shares for nearly $7 million in profit, federal prosecutors said in a press release Monday.

  • August 29, 2022

    Mass. Justices Say Student-Athlete Rightly Denied Eligibility

    Massachusetts' highest court ruled Monday that the state's governing body for high school sports was correct to deny a student's request for a fifth year of eligibility, clarifying the legal standard in such cases.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    The Future Of Legal Ops: Time To Get Serious About Data

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    Most corporate legal departments collect surface-level data around their operations, such as costs and time to resolution, but legal leaders should explore more in-depth data gathering to assess how effective an attorney was, how efficiently legal work was performed, and more, says Andy Krebs at Intel.

  • Mass. Ruling Reduces Employers' Overtime Exposure Risks

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    A Massachusetts court's recent decision in Devaney v. Zucchini Gold, holding that employees whose overtime claims rest solely on the Fair Labor Standards Act cannot recover greater remedies under state law, reduces liability for employers in the state, and guides on overtime calculations and record-keeping duties, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Cannabis Moneyball Has Begun, And The Game Is Heating Up

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    The burgeoning cannabis industry is much like baseball in its early years, with several state players working to come online, and rules being hammered out by state and federal regulators — though it will take some strategic moneyball for the industry to grow market share, earn customer loyalty and make it to home base, say John Oberle and Kristina Dahmann at Ice Miller.

  • Opinion

    ABA Isn't Giving Up On Diversity Efforts By Ending CLE Rule

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    While some view the American Bar Association’s elimination of continuing legal education diversity requirements as capitulating to a Florida Supreme Court decision against the mandate, it was a strategic decision to serve Florida members while improving diversity, equity and inclusion efforts in other ways, says Tiffani Lee at Holland & Knight.

  • How To Protect Health Care Trade Secrets With Covenants

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    Post-employment restrictive covenants such as noncompetes are an effective way for health companies to protect confidential information and trade secrets, but employers must be cognizant of the rapidly changing state laws governing the enforceability of such agreements, say Erik Weibust and Katherine Rigby at Epstein Becker.

  • Lateral Candidate Screening Steps To Prevent Bad Behavior

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    Bullying and harassment are among the root causes of stress, anxiety and substance abuse in the legal profession, so law firms should take four actions to effectively screen lateral candidates and ensure they are not recruiting individuals who could jeopardize the well-being of their people, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • A Look At The Legal Profession Since Murder Of George Floyd

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    Little has changed for Black attorneys since law firms promised to combat discrimination within the profession following George Floyd's murder, but on this second anniversary of his death, law firms can recommit by adopting specific strategies that set their Black lawyers up for success, say Lisa Davis and Khasim Lockhart at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • Opinion

    NY Ruling Correctly Deems Legal Finance Docs Irrelevant

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    A New York appeals court's recent decision in Worldview Entertainment v. Woodrow joins a growing trend of decisions denying discovery of litigation funding documents, highlighting that commercial legal finance should be treated just like any other financing in commercial litigation, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • 2 High Court Rulings Complicate Gov't Regulation Of Speech

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decisions in City of Austin v. Reagan National Advertisements of Austin and Shurtleff v. City of Boston both highlight the complexity of the ever-evolving framework that government officials must use when attempting to regulate speech, say Brady Wilson and Justin Burns at Dinsmore.

  • Employer Travel Benefits Options For Abortion Care Post-Roe

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    Given the likelihood that Roe v. Wade will be overturned, and with the proliferation of state legislation restricting abortion access, employers may want to consider the legal implications of several options to expand travel reimbursement benefits for employees who seek abortion services, say Danita Merlau and Ben Conley at Seyfarth.

  • Opinion

    More Regulation Is Needed In US Fertility Industry

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    Though states have made some progress in recent years, the U.S. fertility industry remains plagued by widespread fraud and legal loopholes that must be addressed with legislation to bolster protections for patients and children conceived through reproductive technology, says Rachel Wexler at Trachman Law Center.

  • Overcommunicate With Your Summer Associates This Year

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    2022 summer associates have had limited opportunities for professional interactions due to the pandemic, so supervising attorneys should prioritize intentional overcommunication by emphasizing importance of tone and content of emails, sharing feedback immediately, and more, says Julie Schrager at Faegre Drinker.

  • Nev. Case Highlights Settlement Authority Dilemmas For Cos.

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    A Nevada federal court's recent decision in Ceja v. The Vons Companies illustrates the pitfalls of misinterpreting a court order requiring a representative with full settlement authority to be present at negotiations, and is a reminder to consider that courts differ as to what full settlement authority means in practice, says Richard Mason at MasonADR.

  • How New Bill May Affect Enforcement Of Mass. Wage Laws

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    It would be difficult to overstate the potential impact of Massachusetts' proposed wage law legislation, which would expand liability for wage theft and enhance enforceability of the commonwealth's wage statutes, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • The Fastest Federal Trial Courts: A Look At Virginia, Florida

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    The Eastern District of Virginia rocket docket and the Northern District of Florida were last year’s fastest civil trial courts in the nation, and interviews with two of their judges reveal they have some of the same practices to keep litigation moving efficiently, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

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