Massachusetts

  • August 13, 2020

    Fed Says It's Testing Distributed Ledgers, Digital Currencies

    The Federal Reserve is actively testing distributed ledger technologies and experimenting with digital currencies as it works toward the potential development of a central bank digital currency, board member Lael Brainard said in a speech on Thursday.

  • August 13, 2020

    Maine's Top Court Nixes Voter Bid To Block $1B Power Line

    A Maine ballot initiative aimed at killing a $1 billion power line that would transmit clean energy from Canada through Maine has been rejected by the state's Supreme Judicial Court after it found on Thursday that the measure would overstep citizens' constitutional authority.

  • August 13, 2020

    Coronavirus Litigation: The Week In Review

    Ticket buyers say StubHub is on the hook for refunds for events canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic, one of the biggest egg suppliers in the country has been accused of price-gouging, and the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation has opted not to centralize all COVID-19 insurance cases.

  • August 13, 2020

    Fantasy Players Take MLB Cheating Suit To 2nd Circ.

    Fantasy sports players asked the Second Circuit Wednesday to give them another crack at a proposed class action alleging Major League Baseball undermined the fantasy contests by failing to take proper action to stop cheating by the Houston Astros and Boston Red Sox.

  • August 13, 2020

    'You Are A Former Lawyer,' Irked Judge Says In Jailing Atty

    A Massachusetts federal judge blasted a former tax attorney Thursday for using his legal skills to aid a pair of pump-and-dump fraud schemes that cost investors up to $15 million, sentencing him to 15 months in prison, or nearly four times longer than prosecutors requested.

  • August 13, 2020

    NY Uber Drivers Lean On Panel Rulings In Pay Practices Row

    New York City drivers told a federal judge that recent appellate rulings clarifying which transportation workers might be exempt from arbitration supports their efforts to litigate claims that Uber shortchanged drivers' fares by deducting ride-hailing taxes as well as inflated service fees.

  • August 13, 2020

    McDermott Nabs Pair Of IP Pros From Polsinelli

    McDermott Will & Emery LLP has beefed up its Boston presence by adding a pair of former Polsinelli PC attorneys in an effort to boost its intellectual property expertise in the health and life sciences arenas.

  • August 13, 2020

    Qiagen Investors Shun Thermo Fisher's $12.5B Offer

    Thermo Fisher Scientific's $12.5 billion attempted takeover of European genetic testing company Qiagen fell apart Thursday, after the sweetened proposal failed to win over a majority of Qiagen's shareholders.

  • August 13, 2020

    Pharmacy Pays $3.5M To Settle DOJ Medicare Kickback Probe

    Specialty pharmacy Advanced Care Scripts Inc. will pay $3.5 million to settle federal claims it helped Teva Neuroscience Inc. funnel kickbacks to Medicare recipients to help them buy the company's multiple sclerosis drug, the U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday.

  • August 13, 2020

    Kirkland, Davis Polk Steer $5.35B Insurance Software Co. Deal

    Private equity firms Vista Equity Partners and Bain Capital, counseled by Kirkland, will sell insurance software provider Vertafore Inc. to Davis Polk-advised Roper Technologies Inc. for roughly $5.35 billion, the companies said Thursday.

  • August 12, 2020

    Curaleaf Becomes Latest Pot Co. Targeted With TCPA Suit

    Curaleaf Inc., which bills itself as the world's largest cannabis corporation, has been hit with a lawsuit in New York federal court accusing it of violating the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, making it the latest pot company to face such a claim.

  • August 12, 2020

    'Varsity Blues' Tipster Gets 1 Year For Stock Schemes

    The man who tipped off federal prosecutors to the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scheme was sentenced to one year in prison Wednesday for his role in a $15 million pair of pump-and-dump schemes, after earning an "unprecedented discount" from the judge for his cooperation.

  • August 12, 2020

    Jobs For 2019 Law Grads Hit Highest Rate In 12 Years

    More than 90% of law graduates in the class of 2019 landed jobs after finishing school in what was the highest such rate in the dozen years since the start of the Great Recession, according to data released Wednesday, although that might be a high-water mark in years to come because of the coronavirus pandemic and its economic fallout.

  • August 12, 2020

    Whole Foods 'Twists Facts' On BLM Mask Ban, Workers Say

    Whole Foods Market Inc. "twists facts" by arguing its refusal to let employees wear Black Lives Matter masks is simply a matter of dress code policy and not illegal discrimination, workers suing the grocery chain said Tuesday in a filing in Massachusetts federal court.

  • August 12, 2020

    British Airways Says Passenger's Tumble Was Her Own Fault

    British Airways PLC asked for a quick win late Tuesday in a suit accusing it of setting up a dangerous situation for disembarkment following a 2018 flight, arguing a passenger who tripped going down a set of mobile stairs and allegedly broke both her legs simply misjudged the bottom step.

  • August 11, 2020

    Another CBD Buyer Class Action Awaits Pending FDA Rule

    A Massachusetts federal judge paused a proposed class action over the potency of CBD supplement products Tuesday, following three other federal courts in saying the suit can wait until the U.S. Food and Drug Administration releases long-awaited rules regulating the popular hemp-derived compound.

  • August 11, 2020

    Feds' Weakening Of Migratory Bird Protections Vacated

    The U.S. Department of the Interior's recent move to loosen restrictions on the incidental killing of migratory birds illegally departed from decades of established practice and runs counter to the intent of a law designed to protect the creatures, a New York federal judge said Tuesday.

  • August 11, 2020

    Mass. Cannabis Facility Workers Vote To Unionize With UFCW

    Workers at an agricultural facility for Cultivate Holdings LLC in Massachusetts, which supplies dispensaries in the greater Boston area, voted to unionize Tuesday with a local affiliate of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union.

  • August 11, 2020

    Boston, LA Ask DC Circ. To Review FCC 5G Order

    Several major U.S. cities, including Boston and Los Angeles, are asking the D.C. Circuit to review a Federal Communications Commission order limiting local governments' authority to delay equipment upgrades in the agency's effort to expedite the deployment of 5G networks.

  • August 11, 2020

    REI Pushed Ineffective Hand Sanitizer Amid Virus, Suit Says

    Outdoor gear retailer Recreational Equipment Inc. and a Massachusetts hand sanitizer company sought to capitalize on the COVID-19 pandemic by falsely marketing an alcohol-free product as a "proven alternative to alcohol sanitizers," according to a putative class action filed in federal court Tuesday.

  • August 11, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    Financial relief from public and private sources poured in over the past week for multiple populations impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, including Delaware and New Jersey renters, Garden State landlords and small businesses, and California small businesses.

  • August 11, 2020

    Rising Star: Skadden's Laura Knoll

    Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP's Laura Knoll guided Array BioPharma in Pfizer's recent $11.4 billion purchase of the pharmaceutical company to complement the pharmaceutical giant's cancer treatment offerings, earning her a spot among the life sciences practitioners under 40 honored as Law360 Rising Stars.

  • August 11, 2020

    T-Mobile Workers Call On 1st Circ. To Save Fidelity ERISA Suit

    A proposed class of T-Mobile employees asked the First Circuit on Monday to revive a suit alleging the company's 401(k) plan manager Fidelity Investments engaged in a pay-to-play scheme, saying a judge wrongly found the investment giant didn't owe them a fiduciary duty.

  • August 11, 2020

    Feds Won't Seek Prison For Reported 'Varsity Blues' Tipster

    Federal prosecutors will not seek prison time for a California man who admitted to participating in a $164 million pump-and-dump scheme and also reportedly tipped off the government to the existence of the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case.

  • August 10, 2020

    Ex-Mass. Judge Wants Out Of Clinician's Harassment Suit

    A former Massachusetts state judge who resigned after being accused of sexually harassing a court clinician sought an early win Monday in a civil suit alleging he orchestrated the woman's removal when she expressed reservations about continuing an affair, arguing he was not her employer.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Elrod Reviews 'Shortlisted'

    Author Photo

    Renee Knake Jefferson and Hannah Brenner Johnson's new book, "Shortlisted: Women in the Shadows of the Supreme Court," is a service to an overlooked group of nine women who were considered for the U.S. Supreme Court before Justice Sandra Day O'Connor was confirmed, and offers constructive tips for women looking to break through the glass ceiling, says Fifth Circuit Judge Jennifer Elrod.

  • Mandatory State Bars Likely To Remain Intact, For Now

    Author Photo

    A Texas federal judge’s recent holding in McDonald v. Sorrels that mandatory bar memberships do not violate members' constitutional rights indicates that such requirements survive the U.S. Supreme Court's 2018 decision in Janus, but it may mean that the Supreme Court will address the issue in the not-too-distant future, say Majed Nachawati and Misty Farris at Fears Nachawati.

  • 11 Keys To Success At Remote Mediation

    Author Photo

    Attorneys should accept that remote mediation may be their only current option for resolving a dispute and take steps to obtain a fantastic outcome for their clients, including making sure the right people attend the remote mediation and beginning the session with an apology, says Eric Meyer at FisherBroyles.

  • What Employers Should Know About Return-To-Work Surveys

    Author Photo

    Jen Rubin at Mintz discusses the risks and benefits of using surveys to gauge employee feelings about COVID-19 safety when returning to the workplace, and shares best practices for responding to the information collected.

  • Pandemic Could Bring Student Exodus From Legal Profession

    Author Photo

    A recent survey shows that law and prelaw students have serious concerns about the quality and value of remotely provided legal education, and rapid action from the legal community is necessary to prevent promising young people from leaving in favor of other professions, says Mehran Ebadolahi at TestMax.

  • The Privilege Implications Of Using Online Collaboration Tools

    Author Photo

    While few courts have addressed the attorney-client privilege or work-product doctrine in the context of online collaboration tools, existing case law supports five best practices as organizations increasingly use these tools in the COVID-19 era, say Christopher Campbell and Marcus Sandifer at DLA Piper.

  • Trends In State COVID-19 Liability Waivers For Care Centers

    Author Photo

    A review of several states' COVID-19 liability waivers for long-term care facilities reveals overarching trends in their scope of protection, as well as some important differences, say attorneys at Foley & Lardner.

  • Do Climate Change Nuisance Suits Belong In Federal Court?

    Author Photo

    Lawsuits brought by cities, counties and states against fossil fuel companies in state courts over the effects of climate change are becoming more common, but splits among federal circuits on whether such litigation belongs in federal courts will need to be resolved by the U.S. Supreme Court, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Confronting Mental Distress In The Legal Profession

    Author Photo

    Even before the pandemic, troubling data about mental distress among lawyers pointed to a profession in crisis, but addressing the challenge requires a better understanding of the causes, says Jonathan Prokup at Cigna Corp.

  • 4 Telehealth Concerns For Care Management After COVID-19

    Author Photo

    Care management organizations shifting to telehealth platforms due to COVID-19 should pay close attention to legal trends and developments in data protection, contract limitations, use of licensed providers and reimbursement policies, say Sarah Blumenthal and Richard Harris at Ropes & Gray.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Finance Investments Are Not Risk-Free Loans

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit's certification order last week in Fast Trak v. Sax presents an important opportunity for the New York high court to affirm the consensus among courts — litigation finance transactions are not loans subject to usury laws, say Wendie Childress and William Marra at Validity Finance.

  • Opinion

    How White Privilege Helped Me Succeed In BigLaw

    Author Photo

    The white, male power structure has eased the path for lawyers like me for far too long, and we should now be responsible for dismantling this systemic bias within the legal industry, says Scott McLaughlin at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • March Trading Halts May Complicate Securities Class Actions

    Author Photo

    Trading restrictions used to mitigate COVID-19 market volatility in March may have had the unintended consequence of hampering price discovery, which could in turn impede market efficiency analysis in securities class actions, say consultants at Cornerstone Research.

  • Keys To A Thriving Biz Development Culture At Your Law Firm

    Author Photo

    As law firms continue to experience the economic impact of the COVID-19 crisis, it is more important than ever that they reduce reliance on just a few rainmakers and foster a culture that makes business development a way of life for everyone — from junior associates to senior partners, says Elise Holtzman at The Lawyer's Edge.

  • 1st Circ. Generic-Delay Ruling Isn't Popular With Lower Courts

    Author Photo

    The criticisms that have been levied against the First Circuit's 2018 reversal of class certification in the Asacol pay-for-delay case — from within and outside the circuit — are notable because they rely on not only precedent but also common sense and genuine concern for consumers, say Karin Garvey and Ethan Kaminsky at Labaton Sucharow.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Massachusetts archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!