Massachusetts

  • September 13, 2021

    Law360's Glass Ceiling Report: What You Need To Know

    Law firms are facing renewed calls to step up their efforts on equity and inclusion. But when it comes to closing the gender gap, law firms still have a long way to go, our annual survey shows.

  • September 13, 2021

    Ex-EBay CEO Taps Heavy Hitters In Couple's Stalking Case

    Former eBay chief executive Devin Wenig has hired two prominent white-collar attorneys to defend against a civil suit claiming he's partly responsible for a harassment campaign targeting a blogging couple over their critical reporting on the e-commerce company.

  • September 13, 2021

    Conagra Must Face Suit Over Cooking Spray Explosion

    Conagra Foods Inc. and the makers of its cooking spray cans must face a suit alleging the products were defectively designed and caused an explosion that burned a food truck cook, after an Illinois federal judge dismissed half of the 12 counts in the complaint.

  • September 10, 2021

    Feds Seek 11 Years For Mass. Mayor's Bribe Scheme

    Federal prosecutors in Boston on Friday asked a Massachusetts federal judge to sentence former Fall River Mayor Jasiel Correia to 11 years in prison after he was convicted by a jury in May, writing in their sentencing motion that Correia is still defiant, "unlike some crooked politicians who eventually accept responsibility."

  • September 10, 2021

    Mass. COVID Tolling Rule Could Affect Thousands Of Suits

    Massachusetts' top court recently ruled that its emergency order tolling civil suit filing deadlines due to the COVID-19 pandemic has broad applications, and experts said it could affect thousands of cases over the next six years.

  • September 10, 2021

    Teva Loses Bid To Dodge Most Of Feds' FCA Case

    A Massachusetts federal judge refused to let Teva Pharmaceuticals USA Inc. escape most of a lawsuit claiming it used two copay foundations to funnel illegal kickbacks to Medicare patients using its multiple sclerosis drug, but agreed to slightly trim the case.

  • September 10, 2021

    Deadly Virus May Excuse NH Virtual Votes, Full 1st Circ. Hints

    The full First Circuit on Friday suggested the New Hampshire House speaker may not be immune from a suit challenging his ban on virtual votes during the COVID-19 pandemic, with one judge saying lawmakers were effectively "ousted with the threat of death."

  • September 10, 2021

    Loughlin Film Trip Greenlighted By 'Varsity Blues' Judge

    Actress and "Varsity Blues" convict Lori Loughlin is heading to Canada for a film gig, winning a Boston federal judge's approval on Friday for the international travel request during her post-prison term of supervised release, just days before co-defendants in the college admissions case head to trial.

  • September 10, 2021

    'Varsity Blues' Mastermind Not Expected To Testify At Trial

    The mastermind behind the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scheme is not expected to take the stand during the high-profile case's first trial, federal prosecutors revealed Friday.

  • September 10, 2021

    15 Firms To Guide IPOs Exceeding $3.4B As Activity Resumes

    Fifteen law firms are set to guide at least 11 initial public offerings that could exceed $3.4 billion in proceeds during the week of Sept. 13, marking the first burst in post-Labor Day IPO activity ahead of what is expected to be a busy autumn.

  • September 10, 2021

    Right To In-Person Trial Should Be Told To Remote Defendants

    Justices on Massachusetts' top court said Friday that judges may need to tell defendants they are entitled to an in-person trial before trying their cases remotely, hearing arguments in one of two cases focused on the criminal justice system's response to the pandemic.

  • September 10, 2021

    Former Mass. Pol's 'Shady' Dealings Merit 18 Mos., Feds Say

    A former Massachusetts representative who served as the vice chair of the state House Ethics Committee should spend 18 months in prison for stealing campaign funds to pay for personal expenses, lying to banks to secure loans and filing false tax returns, federal prosecutors argued Thursday.

  • September 09, 2021

    'Varsity Blues' Judge Seals Jury Selection, Stoking Criticism

    Jury empanelment in the high-profile "Varsity Blues" college admissions case took place behind closed doors Thursday as a judge shut off both in-person and remote access, an unusual decision that First Amendment attorneys say runs afoul of U.S. Supreme Court precedent.

  • September 09, 2021

    Former Asst. US Atty Joins McCarter As Partner In Boston

    McCarter & English LLP added a Boston-based prosecutor who has spent decades serving in federal and state government including a 17-year stint working as an assistant United States attorney as a partner in its government investigations and white collar practice, the firm announced.

  • September 09, 2021

    MIT Prof's Grant Fraud Indictment Can't Be Vague, Judge Says

    Federal prosecutors can't put a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor on trial before adding details to their indictment alleging he hid ties to Chinese research institutions, a judge said during a hearing Thursday.

  • September 09, 2021

    Unvaccinated Aegerion Rep Can't Delay Prison, Feds Say

    A former Aegerion Pharmaceuticals Inc. salesman convicted in 2019 of a $1.8 million drug insurance fraud scheme should not be able to delay prison just because he isn't vaccinated, federal prosecutors argued Thursday.

  • September 09, 2021

    Shoe Co. Exec's 'Insidious Fraud' Calls For 6 Years, Feds Say

    An Alden Shoe Co. executive who pilfered more than $30 million from the business to buy a Nantucket beach home and other personal extravagances should serve more than six years in prison, Massachusetts federal prosecutors said Thursday in a stinging memo.

  • September 09, 2021

    Holland & Knight Snags Nixon Peabody Trial Atty In Boston

    Holland & Knight LLP announced Thursday it has taken on a litigation heavy hitter in Boston from Nixon Peabody LLP who has led more than 60 trials and other matters across a 30-year career.

  • September 09, 2021

    What To Watch For As 'Varsity Blues' Gets Jury Trial Debut

    After 2½ years, 57 defendants and thousands of pages of motion practice, the college admissions case known by its FBI code name "Varsity Blues" will finally go before a jury Monday.

  • September 08, 2021

    Feds Don't Want 'Varsity Blues' Families 'Introduced' To Jury

    Family members of parents going on trial over the "Varsity Blues" scandal should be sequestered during opening statements, federal prosecutors have urged, adding that these family members also should not be "introduced" during opening statements because doing so would only appeal to jurors' sympathies.

  • September 08, 2021

    SEC Says Crypto Startup Sold $18M In Useless Tokens

    A Massachusetts man illegally sold $18 million in unregistered securities in the form of a useless crypto coin, then gave himself a bonus and bought a house in the Cayman Islands, the SEC alleged Wednesday.

  • September 08, 2021

    Chinese National Gets 2 Years For Smuggling Sub Tech

    A federal judge in Massachusetts on Wednesday sentenced a Chinese national to two years in prison for smuggling marine technology to an export-restricted military research institute in China and trying to cover his tracks with lies to investigators.

  • September 08, 2021

    AGs Urge High Court To Allow Puerto Rican SSI Benefits

    A coalition of attorneys general called on the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday to allow Americans in Puerto Rico to receive Supplemental Security Income disability benefits, saying their exclusion from certain welfare programs is harmful and rooted in racism.

  • September 08, 2021

    Coin Metrics Snags Refinitiv Top Attorney For GC Role

    Cryptocurrency financial insights company Coin Metrics announced on Wednesday that it has tapped Refinitiv Americas general counsel Shmuel Bulka to serve as its top attorney.

  • September 07, 2021

    Colgate Exits False Ad Suit Over 'Natural' Tom's Products

    Colgate-Palmolive Co. and the lead plaintiff in a proposed class action in Massachusetts federal court have agreed to end litigation accusing Colgate subsidiary Tom's of misleading customers into paying more for its products by touting them as "natural" when they purportedly contain synthetic ingredients.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Last-Minute Trump Admin. Medicaid Letter Muddles Waivers

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    A Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services letter issued in the final days of the Trump administration and creating onerous hurdles for rescinding Medicaid Section 115 waivers is likely unlawful, but may allow states to delay the cancellation of waivers nonetheless, say Clifford Barnes and Devon Minnick at Epstein Becker.

  • Labor And Employment Changes Ahead For Gov't Contractors

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    President Joe Biden's pro-employee promises, such as a $15 per hour minimum wage and support for union organizing, may be difficult to achieve legislatively, so he will likely impose policy changes on federal contractors using his powers under the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act, says Michael Schrier at Husch Blackwell.

  • NJ 'Reply All' Ethics Opinion Brings New Pitfalls For Attorneys

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    While a recent New Jersey ethics opinion rightly concluded that an attorney cannot claim an ethics violation when opposing counsel replies all to a group email including clients, it runs counter to stances taken by other states and presents new dangers of confidentiality breaches and unfiltered messages to opposing parties, says Roger Plawker at Pashman Stein.

  • Federal Gov't Can Learn From State Drug Pricing Efforts

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    Attorneys at Ropes & Gray explore state legislative efforts to regulate prescription drug pricing, and consider how the Biden administration and Congress might draw on states' experiences to craft a federal drug pricing policy.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Bibas Reviews Rakoff's 'Why The Innocent Plead Guilty'

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    In "Why the Innocent Plead Guilty and the Guilty Go Free,” U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff catalogues the many ways our criminal justice system is broken, and in doing so, gives the public an intimate look into the thoughts, reasoning and personal experiences of a renowned federal judge, says Third Circuit Judge Stephanos Bibas.

  • For Law Firm Digital Marketing, Less Is Sometimes More

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    Attorneys and law firms often look to cast the widest net possible and maximize online impressions, when they should be focusing their digital marketing efforts on fewer, better-qualified prospects, says Guy Alvarez at Good2BSocial.

  • Climate Change Plaintiffs Are Getting Creative

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    The recent efforts by plaintiffs in Juliana v. U.S. to amend their complaint against the U.S. government for allegedly violating their right to a safe climate are an example of how climate change disputes have evolved beyond damages claims, to new and diverse classes of action against governments and companies in courts around the world, say attorneys at White & Case.

  • Opinion

    A State Win In Bank Loan Suit Would Hurt Access To Credit

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    In California v. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, a victory for state regulators arguing for the right to prohibit banks from acquiring loans made in other states that violate local interest rate caps will make it harder and more expensive for consumers to get loans as secondary credit markets recede, says William MacLeod at Kelley Drye.

  • 3 Ways To Plan For A Possible Federal Ban On Noncompetes

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    Following last month's reintroduction of a federal bill seeking to ban or limit the use of employee noncompetes, companies should explore alternative avenues to protect trade secrets, confidential business information, customer goodwill and other legitimate business interests, say Russell Beck and Erika Hahn at Beck Reed.

  • Strategies For Fighting Back Against A Rambo Litigator

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    If your opposing counsel is a so-called Rambo litigator, there are ways to turn their scorched-earth litigation tactics and ad hominem attacks into assets that favor your client, says Margeaux Thomas at Thomas Law.

  • How Ambiguity Can Expand Employee Insurance Coverage

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    The rule that ambiguous insurance policy language should favor the insured continues to endure under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, and the Tenth Circuit ruling in Carlile v. Reliance Standard Life Insurance illustrates how a lack of policy clarity can end in costly litigation and an expensive adverse determination for an insurer, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Sherman.

  • What Hydrogen Cos. Should Know About Fuel Incentives

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    Hydrogen is attracting increasing attention as a low- or zero-emission transportation fuel, so hydrogen producers and suppliers should familiarize themselves with existing and proposed state and federal regulatory frameworks and incentives that can offset production costs, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Opinion

    1 Year Into Pandemic, It's Time To Rethink Law Firm Billing

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    The particular tasks for which a law firm client can expect to be billed have become unpredictable in the era of COVID-19, making flat fees and other alternative fee arrangements more attractive for both in-house and outside counsel, says Jessica Hodkinson at Panasonic.

  • Rogue High Court Citation May Spark Legal Writing Changes

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    Justice Clarence Thomas’ unexpected use of a new citation format in the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Brownback v. King opinion is the most notable citation change in the court's writing in 25 years, and could inspire receptiveness for other innovations in legal writing and beyond, says Carrie Garrison at Porter Wright.

  • The Case For Diversity In Internal Investigation Teams

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    Teams that represent differing backgrounds can uniquely strengthen internal investigation processes with more thorough deliberation, better interviewee trust-building and more effective problem-solving, so law firms and clients alike must avoid the natural impulse to select homogenous groups, say Karin Portlock and Jabari Julien at Gibson Dunn.

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