Massachusetts

  • September 23, 2022

    Former EBay Exec Seeks House Arrest For Stalking Plea

    The last of seven former eBay workers to cop to cyberstalking charges for harassing a pair of e-commerce bloggers argued Friday for a no-prison sentence, saying his role in the scheme was limited to two days of surveillance.

  • September 23, 2022

    2 Men Plead Guilty In Alleged $30M Forex Fraud Scheme

    Two men pled guilty Friday to conspiracy charges for allegedly coaxing investors into giving them money for foreign exchange trades, then fabricating large trading losses and laundering $30 million in proceeds around the globe.

  • September 23, 2022

    PE Giant Advent Hires Ropes & Gray Atty For Top Legal Spot

    Private equity firm Advent International Corp. has named Ropes & Gray partner Amanda McGrady Morrison as managing director, a job in which she will assume the responsibilities of general counsel and chief legal officer, the firm said Thursday.

  • September 22, 2022

    Breaking Down The DOJ's American-JetBlue Antitrust Trial

    American Airlines and JetBlue's highly anticipated showdown with the Biden administration in an upcoming antitrust trial stands to affect how intensely competition enforcers scrutinize future airline combinations, code-share agreements and joint ventures. Here, Law360 takes a closer look at the case.

  • September 22, 2022

    Sen. Judiciary Advances Journalism Competition Bill With Fix

    The Senate Judiciary Committee voted Thursday to advance a bill that would allow certain journalism outlets to collectively negotiate with major tech companies over payment for their content after adopting an amendment barring content moderation issues from the talks.

  • September 22, 2022

    HarbourVest Partners Secures $3B For Its 12th Fund

    Global private markets firm HarbourVest Partners announced on Thursday that it has closed its 12th flagship fund at $3 billion, well over its target of $2 billion.

  • September 22, 2022

    Biopharma Co. Blasts 'Excessive' Fee Bid In Board Pay Case

    After striking a tentative deal to settle a Delaware Chancery suit he filed over alleged "grossly excessive" director pay, an investor plaintiff is now seeking an "excessive" payday for his attorneys, Sage Therapeutics Inc. has told the court.

  • September 22, 2022

    Feds Drop Obstruction Case Against Mass. Judge

    Federal prosecutors on Thursday agreed to dismiss a politically charged criminal case against a Massachusetts state court judge accused of allowing an undocumented immigrant to evade custody when agents showed up to arrest him in the judge's courtroom.

  • September 21, 2022

    Energy Dept. Will Conduct Efficiency Reviews To Settle Suit

    The U.S. Department of Energy will review energy efficiency standards for consumer and commercial products as early as next year to settle litigation from environmental advocacy groups and 17 states alleging the agency dodged its responsibilities to evaluate dozens of products.

  • September 21, 2022

    Manchin Unveils Permitting Reform To Reluctant Congress

    Sen. Joe Manchin on Wednesday released his plan for legislation that would ease the permitting process for infrastructure projects like oil and gas pipelines and electricity transmission lines, but it faces an uncertain future in the divided Congress.

  • September 21, 2022

    Mass Tort Cases Expose Bankruptcy Courts To New Threats

    A New Jersey bankruptcy judge recently revealed that he and his staff have been receiving threats and harassment relating to a talc mass tort case, laying bare how exposed bankruptcy courts are as they are called upon to address societal ills instead of mere financial distress, experts say.

  • September 21, 2022

    TA Announces $1.1 Billion Close of Fifth Debt Fund

    Private equity firm TA Associates announced Wednesday that it had completed fundraising for its latest debt fund with total commitments of $1.1 billion, and plans to use the capital to invest in the debt of the firm's own portfolio companies.

  • September 21, 2022

    1st Circ. Pick Vows To Apply Dobbs 'Faithfully'

    A veteran abortion-rights attorney nominated to the First Circuit vowed to apply the U.S. Supreme Court's recent Dobbs decision "faithfully" and pledged that she would separate her past advocacy from rulings on the bench during a Senate hearing Wednesday.

  • September 21, 2022

    1st Circ. Declines To Review Pot Interstate Commerce Ruling

    The full First Circuit on Wednesday declined to review a split panel decision that found the dormant commerce clause of the U.S. Constitution applies to the federally illegal medical marijuana industry.

  • September 21, 2022

    'Stranded' Martha's Vineyard Migrants Can Sue Anonymously

    Applying a recently established First Circuit framework, a federal judge said Wednesday that a group of migrants suing Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and other state officials who allegedly duped them into flying to Martha's Vineyard could bring their claims anonymously.

  • September 20, 2022

    $2B Appian Trade Secrets Verdict OK'd With $23M Fees Added

    A Virginia judge entered final judgment of a jury's verdict that awarded tech company Appian Corp. more than $2 billion in damages upon finding that Cambridge, Massachusetts-based software company Pegasystems willfully misappropriated Appian's trade secrets.

  • September 20, 2022

    Abortion Rights Atty, A 1st Circ. Pick, May Face Tough Hearing

    Julie Rikelman defended the abortion clinic at the center of the most consequential Supreme Court cases in a generation. But on Wednesday, she'll be defending her own record to senators as she seeks confirmation to the First Circuit.

  • September 20, 2022

    Migrants Say DeSantis 'Stranded' Them On Martha's Vineyard

    Three asylum-seekers who allege they were tricked into boarding flights to Martha's Vineyard sued Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis on Tuesday, saying he violated their constitutional protections against unreasonable seizures by leaving them "stranded" on the Massachusetts island with false promises of relief.

  • September 20, 2022

    51 AGs Urge FCC To Require More Anti-Robocall Protections

    A group of 51 attorneys general urged the Federal Communications Commission to implement several proposed actions that would direct telephone providers routing calls into the U.S. to crack down on foreign scam calls targeting Americans.

  • September 20, 2022

    Private Equity Exec Can't Get Reprieve On 'Varsity Blues' Term

    A former private equity executive can't get an early end to his supervised-release term after being sentenced in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case, a Boston federal judge ruled.

  • September 20, 2022

    Conn. Atty Gets 45 Months For Defrauding Investor Of $1.3M

    A former Connecticut attorney has been sentenced to nearly four years in prison after defrauding an investor of $1.3 million, the U.S. Attorney's Office for Connecticut said.

  • September 20, 2022

    Sidley Leading Walgreens' $1.4B Shields Health Buyout

    Sidley Austin is guiding Walgreens Boots Alliance's nearly $1.4 billion slated purchase of the remaining 30% stake in specialty pharmacy Shields Health Solutions, and Walgreens' president will depart the company, according to a statement Tuesday.

  • September 20, 2022

    Philip Morris Slams 'Excessive' $1B Verdict Over Cancer Death

    Philip Morris USA Inc. on Tuesday vowed to challenge a Massachusetts jury's verdict awarding $1 billion in punitive damages to the estate of a deceased smoker, decrying the sum as "clearly excessive and unconstitutional."

  • September 20, 2022

    'Excessive' Atty Fee Bid In Ranbaxy MDL Slashed By $36M

    A Boston federal judge has cut $36 million from an "excessive" fee request by attorneys for two classes of plaintiffs who settled multidistrict antitrust claims against Ranbaxy Pharmaceuticals for $485 million.

  • September 20, 2022

    Boston Knocks Fired Top Cop's Subpoena Of Davis Malm Atty

    The city of Boston asked a federal judge to reject a subpoena from the city's former police commissioner seeking to question a Davis Malm PC attorney who was tapped to write a report on domestic abuse allegations that got the commissioner fired.

Expert Analysis

  • New Mass. Law A Step Forward For Offshore Wind

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    Recently enacted legislation in Massachusetts demonstrates the state's commitment not only to its renewable energy and greenhouse gas reduction goals, but specifically to supporting development of offshore wind projects — as well as development of transmission infrastructure to connect those projects to the grid, say attorneys at Day Pitney.

  • Law Of The Case Is More Nuanced Than You May Think

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    The recent Seventh Circuit decision in Flynn v. FCA highlights how frequent misconceptions about the law of the case doctrine are, and suggests that litigants should take a hard look at the key qualifications — and quirks — of this narrow and discretionary doctrine before relying on it as a silver bullet, says Michael Soyfer at Quinn Emanuel.

  • Engage Associates At Orientation With Thoughtful Activities

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    The pandemic has driven home the dangers of taking associate talent for granted, and law firms should consider five types of orientation activities that give new employees a greater sense of belonging, set the tone at the outset for a long career and influence attitudes toward the firm, says Joseph Gerstel at GetSomeClass.

  • The Cruciality Of Building Client Intimacy Ahead Of Recession

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    Attorneys are likely already feeling the pressure that a recession brings to control costs and at least hold the line on top-line growth — but strengthening client relationships through increased communication will ensure continued progress under such conditions, says Dave Southern, a business development and marketing professional.

  • How To Win Over Bench Trial Judges Post-COVID

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    As courts face an unprecedented backlog of cases in the wake of the pandemic and are increasingly sensitive to the inefficient use of time, especially in a bench trial setting, advocates should sharpen their rhetorical and strategic tools by thinking big-picture, say Jim Hurst and Jon David Kelley at Kirkland.

  • A Cautionary Tale On Diversity Jurisdiction From The 6th Circ.

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    The Sixth Circuit’s recent opinion in Akno 1010 Market St. v. Pourtaghi highlights the importance of properly establishing citizenship of all parties before filing a federal lawsuit under diversity jurisdiction rules, and shows how overlooking jurisdiction issues could undo years of litigation, say Lauren Snyder and Charles Loeser at Harris Wiltshire.

  • What Litigators Can Really Learn From Rambo

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    A Rambo litigator is a consistently overaggressive and dishonest attorney, but the John Rambo of "First Blood," which recently celebrated its 40th anniversary, has several excellent qualities worth emulating in the legal profession, including professional competence, mental resilience and improvisational ability, says Christopher Van de Kieft at Gitlin Horn.

  • Attorneys Should Note Judges' Financial Conflicts Of Interest

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    The Federal Circuit's recent ruling vacating a $2.75 billion judgment in Centripetal Networks v. Cisco should be a wake-up call for lawyers that they and their clients could pay a heavy price if a judge with financial ties to a litigant fails to take appropriate action, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • A Guide To Navigating Bankruptcy's Impact On IP Licenses

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    With a potential recession on the horizon and intellectual property licensors increasingly likely to seek bankruptcy protection, it is critical to understand how licenses will be treated in bankruptcy, be aware of questions left open by a seminal U.S. Supreme Court decision, and consider careful agreement drafting to avoid bankruptcy's disruptive impacts, say Robert Eisenbach and Evan Lazerowitz at Cooley.

  • A Law Firm's Guide To Avoiding Client Conflicts

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    With the pace of law firm mergers accelerating, Mark Hinderks at Stinson reviews the conflict of interest rules that may derail a deal or cause a firm to lose a new or existing client, and how courts have filled in perceived gaps in the rules.

  • Considerations For Associates As Lateral Hiring Cools Down

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    Law firms are offering fewer signing bonuses and moving back to slower, more deliberate interview processes — a cue for associates to follow suit and consider the long-term advantages of a move instead of short-term financial gain, says Leeron Molloy at VOYlegal.

  • Justices' EPA Ruling Didn't Move Needle On Chevron Doctrine

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    Though some suggest the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in West Virginia v. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency marked the end of a doctrine requiring judicial deference to federal regulators, the ruling merely articulated well-developed precedent on the limits of agency authority, say Dan Wolff and Eryn Howington at Crowell & Moring.

  • Rebuttal

    Circuits Are Consistent On State Law Climate Claim Issue

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    A recent Law360 guest article argued that the U.S. Supreme Court should review the Tenth Circuit's decision in Boulder v. Suncor due to a purported circuit split, but there is no circuit split on whether state law claims arise under federal law for the purpose of conferring removal jurisdiction solely because they involve climate change, says Michael Burger at Columbia Law School.

  • Ethics Lessons From The Alex Jones Discovery Debacle

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    The botched production of a cache of texts and emails prior to Alex Jones' defamation trial, and a failure to take corrective actions, should remind attorneys of the potential pitfalls of discovery, their professional responsibilities throughout the process, and the possibility of severe sanctions, say attorneys at Harris Wiltshire.

  • The Role Of Morality In IP Suits Over COVID-19 Vaccines

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    Recent patent infringement suits involving the COVID-19 vaccines developed by Pfizer and Moderna raise interesting legal and moral issues — like whether infringement should be alleged if it was done during the course of accomplishing a greater good, say Lynn Lehnert and Sara Pilson at Goldberg Segalla.

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