Massachusetts

  • July 8, 2019

    Ex-Insys Bosses Still Aiding 8 Kickback Probes, Feds Say

    Prosecutors told a Boston federal judge on Monday that a pair of former Insys Therapeutics Inc. executives who pled guilty to a scheme to bribe doctors to prescribe opioids are still cooperating in at least eight related investigations, asking that their sentencing hearings be delayed by four months.

  • July 8, 2019

    3 Health Care-Focused Cos. Launch IPOs Totaling $277M

    Three health care-related companies, including a venture capital-backed software provider and two biotechnology firms, set price ranges Monday for initial public offerings that could raise $277 million combined, setting up the IPO market for a recharge after a brief holiday pause.

  • July 8, 2019

    The Biggest M&A Moments Of 2019's First Half

    The first half of 2019 saw deal jumpers, activist challenges and terminations make headlines in the mergers and acquisitions market. Here, Law360 recaps the biggest M&A moments from the last six months.

  • July 8, 2019

    Biggest Enviro Law Rulings So Far In 2019: Midyear Report

    The U.S. Supreme Court made the biggest splash in environmental law during the first half of 2019 when it limited courts' ability to defer to federal agencies' interpretations of their own regulations. Here's a recap of the biggest environment-related court decisions from the first half of the year.

  • July 3, 2019

    Law360’s Diversity Snapshot By The Numbers

    U.S. law firms have been aggressively touting their efforts to advance diversity in their ranks over the past year, but Law360’s annual head count survey shows, at best, incremental progress.

  • July 3, 2019

    Diversity Efforts At Many Firms Ignore Disabled Attorneys

    Data on attorneys with disabilities is scant, but firms with robust outreach programs are discovering just how diverse their ranks are – and can be.

  • July 3, 2019

    The Best Firms For Minority Attorneys

    It’s no secret that the legal industry is one of the least diverse professions in the country. But some law firms have made notable progress. Here are the firms that are making some headway and turning longstanding diversity goals into workplace realities.

  • July 3, 2019

    Despite Progress, Firms Still Slow To Track LGBT Data

    Many law firms are hesitant to ask about attorneys’ sexual orientation, but by not giving lawyers an opportunity to share this information, diversity experts say, firms are selling themselves short.

  • July 3, 2019

    UBS Can't Revive Bid For $20M Coverage Of Debt Bond Suits

    The First Circuit on Wednesday upheld a lower court’s ruling that UBS AG units cannot tap into $20 million in insurance coverage to defray costs associated with claims that investors lost billions of dollars because UBS manipulated Puerto Rico's municipal debt bond market.

  • July 3, 2019

    1st Circ. Brushes Off Dental Co.'s Insurance Claim For TM Suit

    HDI Global Insurance Co. did not have to cover a trademark suit involving a dental products manufacturer because the policy had an exclusion for intellectual property claims, the First Circuit said Tuesday in a dental-pun-filled affirmation of a lower court ruling.

  • July 3, 2019

    Discipline Advised For Mass. Asst. AGs In Chemist Case

    The Massachusetts Office of Bar Counsel has recommended discipline against a trio of former assistant attorneys general who allegedly withheld information regarding a disgraced state drug lab chemist from the district attorneys who were handling cases she was involved with.

  • July 3, 2019

    The Biggest Legal Ethics Decisions Of 2019: Midyear Report

    During the first six months of 2019, the legal ethics arena saw a Tenth Circuit decision on judicial ethics complaints against U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh and the first of several potential rulings on conflicts in the “Varsity Blues” college admissions case. Here are some of the top legal ethics and malpractice decisions from the first half of the year.

  • July 3, 2019

    The Biggest Noncompete Decisions Of 2019: Midyear Report

    So far this year, a Massachusetts court has handed down the first interpretation of the Bay State's 2018 law reining in noncompetes, California has continued to look critically on nonsolicitation agreements, and a New Jersey appeals court has recognized an expectation of loyalty for Garden State employers. ​​Here, Law360 looks at these and other decisions from the first half of 2019 that noncompete attorneys should be aware of.

  • July 3, 2019

    The 4 Cities Law Firms Have Flocked To So Far In 2019

    National and global law firms opened up a slew of new offices across the U.S. during the first half of 2019 as the legal industry rode high on a strong economy, but four cities attracted an outsized slice of that action. Here is a look at those openings, who was involved and how they did it.

  • July 2, 2019

    25 State AGs Urge CFPB Not To Roll Back Overdraft Rule

    Attorneys general representing half the states in the nation signed on to a Monday letter urging the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau not to alter its overdraft rule, as the agency carries out a mandatory 10-year review of the regulation due to be completed this November.

  • July 2, 2019

    2 Firms Grab Spotlight In Scorching June For IPOs

    Two law firms grabbed the lion’s share of initial public offerings activity in June, a vibrant month that saw 25 companies go public and raise $6.5 billion, concluding the strongest quarter in four years while a robust pipeline awaits the second half of 2019.

  • July 2, 2019

    Cooley Hid Conflict While Helping Launch Company, Suit Says

    Attorneys for Cooley LLP failed to tell a New Jersey chemist that the firm had previously worked with his partner, then represented the partner's interests at the expense of the chemist's while they launched a new company, according to a lawsuit filed Monday in Massachusetts state court. 

  • July 2, 2019

    Insys Reaches Ch. 11 Deal To Pause State Opioid Suits

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge on Tuesday gave his nod to a deal that Insys Therapeutics Inc. has brokered with a handful of state attorneys general to pause opioid litigation as the company moves forward with plans for its Chapter 11 sale.

  • July 2, 2019

    States Reach $6M Deal With LexisNexis Over Withheld Fees

    LexisNexis Risk Solutions Inc. agreed on Tuesday to pay $5.8 million to resolve a suit in Florida federal court brought by various states and a city alleging that the data and analytics company wrongfully withheld fees from law enforcement agencies when reselling their automobile crash reports.

  • July 2, 2019

    Trump Free To End Liberian Work Program, Gov't Says

    The Trump administration on Monday asked a Boston federal judge to toss an amended lawsuit over a work program for Liberian nationals, saying the president has free rein to make decisions about the program that is set to expire in March 2020.

  • July 2, 2019

    After Guilty Plea, Fraudster Launched New Scam, Feds Say

    A Massachusetts man who was convicted earlier this year of money laundering has been charged with operating a similar scheme after his plea, according to a federal criminal complaint unsealed Monday.

  • July 2, 2019

    Credit Union Settles Suit Over 'Misleading' Overdraft Policy

    New England's largest credit union settled a proposed class action by customers who say its overdraft policies are unclear, according to a brief filing Tuesday in Massachusetts federal court.

  • July 2, 2019

    Mass. Firm Seeks $1M Fee After Win In State Police Bias Suit

    Messing Rudavsky, the firm that represented a New Bedford, Massachusetts, police officer who won a discrimination suit and a six-figure judgment against the state police in December, asked a federal judge late Monday to approve more than $1 million in attorney fees and costs for the victory.

  • July 2, 2019

    House Tax Panel Sues Treasury For Trump's Tax Returns

    The House’s tax committee sued the U.S. Department of the Treasury in federal court for President Donald Trump’s tax return information on Tuesday, setting in motion a legal battle that will likely end at the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • July 1, 2019

    FCC Must Keep Minimum Hours Of Kid TV, Senators Say

    The Federal Communications Commission should continue to require broadcasters to air three hours of regularly scheduled educational children's programming a week on their primary stations, instead of relaxing the rules, nine Democratic senators have said in a letter.

Expert Analysis

  • How To Streamline Virtual Law Team Mass Tort Defense

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    A primary benefit of the virtual law team in mass tort litigation is creative collaboration. A "company case" approach is essential to breaking down the silos between team members, say attorneys at FaegreBD and Reed Smith.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Fateful Phone Call

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    When I was growing up, my mother was always the more mild-mannered parent. But during a trans-Atlantic phone call in 1991, when I told her I wanted to go to culinary school instead of law school, she started yelling — at a volume I had never heard from her, says Jason Brookner of Gray Reed.

  • Law Firms Can Do Better With Their Mentoring Programs

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    There are a few practical, proactive steps law firms can take to create a mentoring program that pays dividends — instead of creating a mediocre program that both parties see as an obligation, says Kate Sheikh of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • 'Rocket Docket' Justifies Its Name For 11th Straight Year

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    The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia “rocket docket” is still the fastest federal civil trial court in the country despite some recent trends causing its median time to trial to grow to 13.2 months, says Robert Tata of Hunton.

  • The 'Newly Acquired Information' Shift In Pharma Litigation

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    Before 2015, most failure-to-warn cases against pharmaceutical companies generally hinged on the adequacy of warnings given to prescribing physicians. But a survey of recent cases reveals that many now turn on whether there is “newly acquired information” permitting the manufacturer to change its labeling, says Richard Dean of Tucker Ellis.

  • Mass. Foreclosure Ruling Offers Lessons For Lenders

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    A recent Massachusetts appellate decision is a wake-up call for foreclosing lenders to make sure they get the best price and a reminder of gray areas in the rules of the Massachusetts foreclosure game, says Francesco De Vito of Rackemann Sawyer.

  • State Net

    Ariz. May Lead Charge For Professional Licensing Reciprocity

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    This year, Arizona became the first state to open up most of its licensed professions to people who obtained licenses in other states. Efforts to allow licensing reciprocity are cropping up in other states as well, but with limited success, says Dave Royse of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Measuring The Value Of A Law Firm's Social Media Efforts

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    Most legal marketers struggle to show the return on investment of their social media efforts, but establishing and answering several key questions can help demonstrate exactly how social media programs contribute to a law firm's bottom line, say Guy Alvarez of Good2bSocial and communications consultant Tom Orewyler.

  • California Tax Takes: Conclusion Of The Hyatt Saga

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    The U.S. Supreme Court decided the latest and final iteration of Franchise Tax Board of California v. Hyatt last month. In their latest roundup of state tax law issues, attorneys at Reed Smith discuss the implications of the Hyatt decision, as well as two key developments in the state Legislature.

  • Opinion

    Cybersecurity Lawmaking Needs Help From Specialists

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    The failure of states to produce technologically fluent data security legislation has led to laws rife with logical inconsistencies, ambiguities and possible loopholes — which can be avoided if bills are drafted with the input of technologists and information security lawyers, says Jason Wool of ZwillGen.

  • Collateral Descriptions May Need More Specific Drafting

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    For years, courts ruled that collateral descriptions in financing statements just needed to give enough notice to cause subsequent creditors to make further inquiry with the debtor, but there are signs that the “further inquiry doctrine” may not offer secured creditors as much protection as it once did, says Peter Beardsley of Loeb & Loeb.

  • State Net

    California's Amended, Ambiguous Data Privacy Law

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    Recently advanced bills are aiming to carve out numerous exceptions to California’s sweeping data privacy law before it goes into effect next year. But more significant may be the fact that many of the law's terms are vaguely defined, making compliance challenging, says Rich Ehisen of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Opinion

    Millennials Are Pushing Back Against Law Firm Sexism

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    A recent survey of millennial attorneys shows men and women are having very different BigLaw experiences, but share similar goals. It's imperative that partners recognize that they’re the ones in a position to change the culture, says Michelle Fivel of Major Lindsey.

  • 3 Law Firm Business Tactics To Support A Niche Practice

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    Once you've chosen a strategy for your law firm, what tactics will promote success? There are three tactical areas important to all firms, regardless of specialty or size, but particularly critical for today’s niche firms, say Yussuf Aleem and Jacob Slowik of Joseph Aleem.

  • Real-Life Lessons For Lawyers From 'Game Of Thrones'

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    What lessons can the various hands, maesters, council members and other advisers in "Game of Thrones" impart to real-life lawyers? Quite a few, if we assume that the Model Rules of Professional Conduct were adopted by the Seven Kingdoms, says Edward Reich of Dentons.

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