Massachusetts

  • July 1, 2019

    Mass. City Second To Ban Facial Recognition In US

    The Massachusetts city of Somerville has become the second U.S. city to ban government use of facial recognition, in an effort by privacy advocates to tamp down on the embattled technology weeks after San Francisco passed the nation’s first prohibition.

  • July 1, 2019

    Postmates Settles Suit Over Massachusetts Drivers' Tips

    On-demand delivery app Postmates and its Massachusetts drivers and riders settled a federal class lawsuit Monday over allegations that the company failed to pass along delivery fee tips, ending the latest skirmish on the sprawling gig economy battlefield.

  • July 1, 2019

    Dems Question Industry Dominance On FCC Advisory Board

    Two Democratic lawmakers are asking the Federal Communications Commission for wide-ranging information about industry’s role in a key agency advisory council, suggesting that telecom companies and trade groups wield outsize influence on the panel to sway policy in business interests’ favor.

  • July 1, 2019

    11 AGs Sue EPA Over Rejected Asbestos Regulations

    Eleven attorneys general said Monday that they have filed a lawsuit challenging the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's rejection of their call for stricter reporting requirements for the import and use of asbestos.

  • July 1, 2019

    States Won't OK Trial Date In Sprint-T-Mobile Challenge

    A coalition of states challenging the merger of mobile telecom giants T-Mobile and Sprint have told a New York federal judge that they won't be able to commit to a trial date until several issues are resolved.

  • July 1, 2019

    Investment Adviser To Pay SEC $1.3M To End Conflict Claims

    A Massachusetts investment adviser agreed Monday to pay the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission $1.3 million to settle charges that he leveraged $7 million of his clients' money to avoid repaying a personal loan.

  • July 1, 2019

    Partners Uses Old Mortality Rates For Annuities, Suit Says

    Partners Healthcare, the largest health care network in Massachusetts, uses a 60-year-old mortality table to calculate retirement benefits for some former employees, robbing them of thousands of dollars in defiance of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, according to a proposed class action in Boston federal court.

  • July 1, 2019

    Ex-Judge Hit With $2.85M Suit Over Probation Power Grab

    A retired judge and former chief justice of the Massachusetts trial court has been hit with a $2.85 million civil suit by two former probation department officials who claim they were forced out and faced criminal charges due to a personal grudge and a desire to control department hiring.

  • June 28, 2019

    High Court Census Ruling Could Escalate Rule Challenges

    When a slim U.S. Supreme Court majority blocked the Trump administration from adding a citizenship question to the census because the government hadn't been forthcoming, the justices gave litigants an irresistible precedent to cite in future policy fights with federal agencies, experts said.

  • June 28, 2019

    Conservative Justices Cross Over To Create Unusual Lineups

    Members of the conservative majority on the U.S. Supreme Court had some surprises for court watchers this term, with one of the newer — and generally most conservative — justices becoming a particularly strange bedfellow to liberals.

  • June 28, 2019

    Warren Probes JPMorgan's Return To Cardholder Arbitration

    Two Democratic lawmakers, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren, want to know why JPMorgan Chase brought back a policy of forcing its millions of credit card users to arbitrate any disputes, saying the plan would exploit customers.

  • June 28, 2019

    The Sharpest Dissents Of The Supreme Court Term

    The dozens of dissents the U.S. Supreme Court issued this term outpaced those in the prior term, and their tone is growing harsher as justices vie for control of a court that is still reeling from the retirement of swing Justice Anthony Kennedy.

  • June 28, 2019

    Raytheon Accused Of Shorting Retirees On Benefits

    Raytheon Co. and its benefits committee have been hit with a proposed class action in Massachusetts federal court alleging that they shortchanged retirees and violated the Employee Retirement Income Security Act by using outdated mortality rates to calculate retirement benefits.

  • June 28, 2019

    1st Circ. Affirms Dismissal Of Investor's Biogen Suit

    The First Circuit on Thursday affirmed the dismissal of an investor lawsuit alleging biopharmaceutical company Biogen Inc. downplayed the impact a patient death had on sales, saying the supposedly misleading statements weren't made with intent or knowledge of wrongdoing.

  • June 28, 2019

    Sotomayor, Breyer Vie For Chattiest High Court Justice

    On the U.S. Supreme Court's famously "hot" bench, Justice Sonia Sotomayor stood out once again as the most active questioner this term, speaking up more often than any of her colleagues.

  • June 28, 2019

    Another Parent Charged In 'Varsity Blues' Admissions Scandal

    Federal prosecutors in Boston filed charges Friday against a parent in the "Varsity Blues" scandal for the first time since the case against 50 defendants was announced in March, saying a California man will plead guilty to paying bribes to secure his son's admission to the University of Southern California.

  • June 28, 2019

    2 Firms Score $5.6M For Work On $18.7M Chiasma Deal

    A Boston federal court has awarded Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP and Johnson Fistel LLP over $5.6 million in attorney fees for their work securing an $18.7 million settlement in an investor class action alleging biopharmaceutical company Chiasma misrepresented a drug's chances for winning FDA approval.

  • June 28, 2019

    The Funniest Moments Of The Supreme Court Term

    While general audiences may have a hard time finding the humor, there were several moments of legal levity in the Supreme Court this term that made the justices and the courtroom laugh.

  • June 27, 2019

    The New 'Roberts Court' Finds Its Footing

    Chief Justice John Roberts is presiding over the most conservative Supreme Court in years. But as the 2018 term showed, the reality is more complicated and the new majority is far weaker than expected.

  • June 27, 2019

    Breaking Down The Vote: High Court Term In Review

    A new junior justice. A growing number of dissents. Tough talk on overturning precedent. Unusual lineups in 5-4 rulings. This term left court watchers wondering: “What’s next?”

  • June 27, 2019

    'Varsity Blues' Parents Counter Feds' BigLaw Conflict Claims

    Several parents caught up in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scandal told a Massachusetts federal court Thursday they want to keep their counsel from Latham & Watkins, Nixon Peabody and Ropes & Gray despite federal prosecutors’ concerns about the firms' potential conflicts.

  • June 27, 2019

    SEC Targets 4 Attys Over Alleged Roles In PixarBio Fraud

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission leveled civil securities fraud allegations Thursday against five people, including four attorneys, who allegedly helped facilitate a sham merger and unlawful public stock sales involving embattled Massachusetts biotech PixarBio.

  • June 27, 2019

    Goodwin-Led BridgeBio Tops 3 Biotech IPOs Totaling $749M

    BridgeBio Pharma priced shares in a $348.5 million initial public offering steered by Goodwin Procter LLP, leading the way as three biotechnology firms hit the market Thursday after raising a combined $749 million.

  • June 27, 2019

    The Firms That Won Big At The Supreme Court

    Arguing one Supreme Court case is no mean feat, and only a handful of law firms tackled at least three during the latest high court term. Here’s a look at those high-profile battles, and which firms emerged victorious once the dust settled.

  • June 27, 2019

    State Street Settles SEC's Overcharging Claims For $88M

    State Street Bank and Trust Co. reached an $88 million settlement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday for allegedly overcharging clients $170 million for the costs of financial transactions.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Tips To Help Your Summer Associates Succeed

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    There are a number of ways that attorneys can ensure their summer associates successfully manage critical writing assignments and new types of professional interactions, says Julie Schrager of Schiff Hardin.

  • Keys To Communicating A Law Firm's Mission

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    Today’s law firm leaders are pretty good at developing a strategic vision for the enterprise, but there is often a disconnect between that road map and the marketing department’s rank and file, leading to a deliverable that does little to differentiate the firm, says José Cunningham, a legal industry consultant.

  • Mass. Data Privacy Bill Poses Potential Class Action Risks

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    Massachusetts is considering a consumer data privacy bill with a private right of action that could become the broadest in the country, creating the potential for a surge of data privacy class actions in courts across the state, say attorneys with Pierce Atwood.

  • Federal Agencies Dig In For Prolonged PFAS Fight

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    The remarkably public fight between the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Congress over allowable levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in groundwater means businesses will likely not see uniform nationwide standards on PFAS anytime soon, say Jeffrey Dintzer and Clynton Namuo at Alston & Bird.

  • Opinion

    How Lawyers Can Help Save The Planet

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    Over a dozen major law firms have joined our effort to overcome the legal obstacles that states, cities and businesses face in fighting climate change. But more lawyers are needed, say Michael Gerrard of Columbia Law School and John Dernbach of Widener University Commonwealth Law School.

  • Cashless Retail Brings Benefits, Drawbacks And Backlash

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    Retailers exploring the cashless option should carefully consider the customer experience, as well as legislation being advanced by numerous state and city governments to require businesses to accept cash, say Meegan Brooks and Douglas Kantor at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • Opinion

    IRS Should Use Tax Law To Combat The Opioid Epidemic

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    The IRS, which enforces anti-trafficking tax laws against state-regulated cannabis businesses, should be fair and apply the same policy against pharmaceutical companies that illegally market their opioids, says Kat Allen at Wykowski Law.

  • State Net

    Why States And Cities Are Concerned About Census Accuracy

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    The 2020 census will impact every state, city and county in the United States, because population is a major factor in how the federal government distributes funds. Despite apprehensions about an undercount, there are reasons for optimism about the accuracy of the census, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • The Evolution Of Software As A Service Taxes Post-Wayfair

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    Due to the expanded nexus provisions following South Dakota v. Wayfair, software as a service providers need to be especially aware of the recent — and, at times, divergent — state law developments in SaaS taxation, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • Don't Let License Rules Snuff Out Your Fire Expert

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    Lawsuits involving property damage due to fire often require the retention of an expert to investigate the fire, but testimony can be excluded if the expert lacks the required licenses. Attorneys at Tucker Ellis break down the different licensing requirements for fire scene inspection in all 50 states.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

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    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • State Net

    State Lawmakers Stepping Up Fight Against Insurance Fraud

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    Insurance fraud costs insurers and their policyholders tens of billions of dollars a year. With insurance fraud-related bills introduced in 40 states and enacted in 14 so far this year, state lawmakers seem to agree with the industry that fraud is a major problem, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

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    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.

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