Massachusetts

  • September 19, 2022

    British Airways Settles Suit Over Passenger's Stairway Tumble

    British Airways PLC said Monday it has settled with a passenger who was scheduled next month to tell a federal jury in Massachusetts how she broke both her legs after falling off a mobile staircase at Heathrow Airport.

  • September 19, 2022

    Crypto Co. Owner Cops To Laundering Alleged Ponzi Funds

    A Florida man has pled guilty to laundering the proceeds of an alleged Ponzi-style scheme involving purported bitcoin investments using businesses he managed in Texas, Florida and Nigeria.

  • September 16, 2022

    'Varsity Blues' Ruling May Cut The Heart Out Of Bribe Case

    A judge's decision to grant a new trial to a coach convicted in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scandal could severely undermine the government's effort to affirm guilty verdicts after other parents convicted in the scheme launched a closely watched first appeal, experts told Law360.

  • September 16, 2022

    Harvard Discovery Request Mocked By Insurer As Stall Tactic

    Harvard shouldn't be allowed to conduct more discovery in its dispute with Zurich American Insurance Co. for coverage of costs incurred defending an affirmative action case now before the U.S. Supreme Court, the insurer told a Massachusetts federal court.

  • September 16, 2022

    Warren Calls On DOT To Scrutinize JetBlue-Spirit Merger

    Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., called on the U.S. Department of Transportation on Thursday to step up its scrutinization of airline mergers, beginning with the proposed merger between JetBlue and Spirit Airlines.

  • September 16, 2022

    Boston Hospital Nears Deal To End Retirement Fee Suit

    Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a prestigious teaching hospital that works in partnership with Harvard Medical School, is nearing a settlement with employees who filed a class action suit alleging the hospital mismanaged their retirement savings.

  • September 16, 2022

    Ambulance Billing Co. Sued Over 'Utter Failure' To Stop Hack

    An ambulance billing company's "utter failure" to protect its networks from intrusion allowed hackers to access sensitive personal data that may have included Social Security numbers and health information, according to a proposed class action moved to Massachusetts federal court Friday.

  • September 16, 2022

    SEC Fines 4 Firms Over Alleged Pay-To-Play Violations

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has made settlements with four different investment advisory firms over allegations that they violated the commission's pay-to-play rule, which prohibits investment advisers from providing services to government-related clients for two years following a political campaign contribution made by the firm or an associate.

  • September 15, 2022

    Tribe Urges Justices To Weigh Immunity In Bankruptcy Cases

    The Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a First Circuit ruling that Native American tribes aren't exempt from federal law blocking suits against debtors who have filed for bankruptcy, saying the high court must resolve a circuit split over whether the federal Bankruptcy Code deprives tribes and their businesses of their sovereign immunity.

  • September 15, 2022

    Mass. Woman Charged In Bomb Hoax At Boston Hospital

    A Massachusetts woman has been charged with calling in a hoax bomb threat to Boston Children's Hospital because of her opposition to the medical center's services to gender-diverse and transgender children, prosecutors said Thursday.

  • September 15, 2022

    GOP Transport Of Migrants Ripped As Political 'Kidnapping'

    Humanitarian groups reacted with fury Thursday and regulators were left scrambling after the Republican governors of Florida and Texas transported large groups of migrants to blue states, prompting swift calls for legal action.

  • September 15, 2022

    Basketball Hall Of Fame Seeks Coverage For Renovation Suit

    The Basketball Hall of Fame said a Chubb unit must defend and indemnify it in an underlying action accusing the nonprofit organization and its for-profit subsidiary of unlawfully conspiring to secure funds for a renovation project.

  • September 15, 2022

    Raytheon Worker Seeks Mass. Justices' Take On Remote Work

    An unvaccinated engineer who claims Raytheon Technologies Corp. illegally refused his work-from-home request wants Massachusetts' top appellate court to weigh in on whether employees are entitled to accommodations based on a family member's disability.

  • September 15, 2022

    Raytheon Strikes Deal To End Autism Therapy Coverage Suit

    Raytheon agreed to pay $640,000 to settle a class action in Massachusetts federal court that accused the defense conglomerate's health benefit plan of discriminating against people with autism by denying coverage for speech therapy.

  • September 15, 2022

    'Varsity Blues' Coach Wins New Trial, Bolstering Parents' Case

    A former University of Southern California water polo coach was granted a new trial Thursday in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case, dealing the government a setback as it prepares to argue the appeals by two parents convicted in the alleged scheme to admit wealthy children to college through fraud.

  • September 15, 2022

    Drugmaker Akorn To Pay $7.9M For 'Rx-Only' Medicare Claims

    Illinois-based pharmaceutical company Akorn LLC will pay $7.9 million to settle allegations it defrauded Medicare by submitting false claims for generic drugs that were no longer covered by the health insurance program, prosecutors said Wednesday.

  • September 14, 2022

    Debevoise-Led AIG Spinoff Hits $1.68B In 2022's Biggest IPO

    AIG spinoff Corebridge Financial Inc. announced a nearly $1.7 billion initial public offering Wednesday, led by Debevoise & Plimpton LLP with underwriters counsel Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton, which, although priced at the low end of its projected range, still represents the largest IPO in a largely dormant 2022 market.

  • September 14, 2022

    Real Estate Rumors: UBS, Picus, Buzz Oates

    UBS reportedly could fetch as much as $125 million with the sale of a New York rental building, Picus Capital is said to be leasing 6,520 square feet in New York and Buzz Oates reportedly hopes to build a 107,612-square-foot biotech facility in California.

  • September 14, 2022

    White House Details $2B Biotech Supply Chain Initiative

    The White House's recently announced drive to advance U.S. biotechnology and biomanufacturing will cost more than $2 billion, the Biden administration said on Wednesday.

  • September 14, 2022

    Sanofi Puerto Rico Unit Excused From Insulin Antitrust Case

    A Puerto Rico subsidiary of Sanofi-Aventis cannot be held liable for any alleged antitrust violations by its parent company in a suit accusing the pharmaceutical giant of improperly listing patents for the injector pen of lucrative diabetes drug Lantus, a Boston federal judge ruled Wednesday.

  • September 14, 2022

    Senate Confirms Rhode Island Public Defender To 1st Circ.

    The Senate voted Wednesday to confirm Lara E. Montecalvo, the public defender of Rhode Island, to the First Circuit.

  • September 14, 2022

    Sports Site Latest To Be Sued For Routing Data To Facebook

    A Texas-based sports streaming company joined the ranks of Paramount, Discovery Communications, Bloomberg News and other media giants Tuesday as it was hit with a proposed class action claiming it illegally funneled user information to Facebook through a snippet of computer code.

  • September 13, 2022

    Mass. Residents Say Mashpee Can't Have Casino Trust Land

    Some Massachusetts residents maintain that the federal government illegally acquired land in their city for a Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe casino development, slamming the U.S. Department of the Interior for an "unprecedented manipulation" of its 2014 legal record detailing that authority.

  • September 13, 2022

    1st Circ. Won't Ax $5.5M Notre Dame Construction Award

    The First Circuit on Tuesday upheld a $5.5 million arbitration judgment awarded to the University of Notre Dame over the objections of two developers regarding a botched student housing project, with a panel rejecting a claim that the deadline for confirming the award had passed.

  • September 13, 2022

    Raytheon Wants Out Of Rod End Bearing Design Suit

    Raytheon Technologies Corp. asked a Massachusetts federal judge on Monday to rule in its favor in a lawsuit that claimed it unlawfully used and shared another manufacturer's rod end bearing design because the design was shared with Raytheon "without restriction" and is full of features that are common knowledge rather than trade secrets.  

Expert Analysis

  • Combating Implicit Bias In Alternative Dispute Resolution

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    Alternative dispute resolution requires a high degree of trust and belief that proceedings will be fair, so confronting implicit associations among neutrals through systemic and personal efforts is even more important in the ADR world, say arbitrators and mediators at JAMS.

  • How The Metaverse Will Affect Business And Legal Processes

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    It is time to start thinking about virtual reality's effects on cybersecurity, business dealings, case strategy and more, as the metaverse takes shape and organizations open banks, host law firm offices and create retail strategies digitally, says Samantha Green at Epiq. 

  • Navigating Arbitral Subpoenas In A Post-COVID Landscape

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    Courts’ mixed enforcement during the pandemic of physical presence and territorial requirements for arbitral subpoenas shows that the rules were not built for a virtual world, making it critical for lawyers to understand the possible limitations on third-party evidence, say Emily Kirsch and Craig Tarasoff at Kirsch & Niehaus.

  • Defense Lessons From A 'Varsity Blues' Acquittal

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    Although most of the individuals charged in the "Varsity Blues" investigation ultimately chose to plead guilty, defendant Amin Khoury was acquitted, and the way his defense team chose to frame the facts in the trial narrative is instructive, says Thomas Murphy at Friedlander Misler.

  • Lessons From FERC New England Capacity Market Settlement

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    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's recent enforcement settlement with Salem Harbor Power Development illustrates the consequences for power market participants if they fail to report accurate information to independent system operators and regional transmission organizations, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Circuit Split On Cannabis Prosecutions Heightens Uncertainty

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    Congress' use of an appropriations bill rider to defund certain kinds of criminal cannabis prosecutions has resulted in a circuit split over how it should be enforced, adding to the already long list of regulatory uncertainties that burden state-legal cannabis industries and operators, say Julia Matlin and Richard Trotter at Feuerstein Kulick.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: MDL Time?

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    Whether the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation creates a multidistrict proceeding to handle class actions against a timekeeping and payroll software provider that experienced a cyberattack can provide interesting insight into the panel's process for determining when time is ripe for a new MDL, says Alan Rothman at Sidley.

  • How Lawyers Can Set Ethical Boundaries Post-Pandemic

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    The COVID-19 pandemic and remote work have made it harder for lawyers to leave their problems at the office, so legal professionals must establish and adhere to ethical boundaries in order to combat increasing levels of stress and burnout, says Jennifer Gibbs at Zelle.

  • A Lawyer's Guide To Collecting Fees From Nonpaying Clients

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    You've done the work and sent the bill, but haven't been paid. What do you do? Joshua Wurtzel at Schlam Stone offers recommendations on how lawyers — from solo practitioners to BigLaw partners — can avoid leaving significant receivables on the table from clients who have the ability to pay.

  • How Lawyers Can Benefit From TikTok Without Being 'Cringe'

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    TikTok should be on every attorney's radar as a digital branding opportunity, but it's important to understand the app and some best practices before diving in, says Cecillia Xie at Yale University.

  • Patent Drafting Reminders In Fed. Circ. Skin Care Ruling

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    The Federal Circuit's recent University of Massachusetts v. L'Oréal decision illustrates how patent claim language should be viewed in the context of both the claim as a whole and the patent as a whole, making consistency crucial, say attorneys at Finnegan.

  • What Mass. Harbor Development Ruling Means For Projects

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    The Massachusetts high court's recent decision in Armstrong v. Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs, striking down use of municipal harbor plans for tidelands licensing, will create hurdles for waterfront projects, say Vic Baltera and Leigh Gilligan at Sullivan & Worcester.

  • Must Your Client Pay An Opponent's Expert For Prep Time?

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    For parties seeking discovery from an opponent's expert, the law on compensating the expert for preparation time is not settled, and in certain jurisdictions, there are strong arguments that favor avoiding or at least limiting such fee shifting, say Gregory Ruehlmann and Nicholas Mecsas-Faxon at King & Spalding.

  • Chancery Holding Amplifies Approach To Boardroom Issues

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    The Delaware Chancery's recent Goldstein v. Denner decision, that Bioverativ directors may have breached their fiduciary duties when Sanofi purchased the company, expands the court's approach on director independence, severance-related conflicts and gaps in board minutes, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Opinion

    Bar Exam Policies On Menstruation Still Fall Short

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    While many states have taken steps to address long-standing and problematic bar exam policies on menstruation and menstrual products, the changes do not go far enough to remove the continued disadvantages menstruating test takers face, highlighting the need for comprehensive and quick action ahead of this month's exams, say law professors Margaret Johnson, Elizabeth Cooper and Marcy Karin.

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