New York

  • July 06, 2020

    Banker Says Cowen Fired Him For Objecting To Oligarch

    A former Cowen and Co. LLC banker said Monday that he was fired after raising concerns about the company's prospective business relationship with a Russian oligarch rumored to be involved in money laundering and arms dealing, according to a suit filed in New York federal court.

  • July 06, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: PIMCO, Hill Country Barbecue, PNC Bank

    A PIMCO venture is reportedly close to a deal to buy a San Francisco property from Juul Labs, Hill Country Barbecue is said to have renewed its lease for 10,990 square feet in New York for 12 years, and PNC Bank has reportedly loaned $66.27 million for a South Florida senior living project.

  • July 06, 2020

    McClatchy Creditors Must Wait On Auction To Roll Out Suit

    A New York bankruptcy judge said Monday that the unsecured creditors of news chain McClatchy Co. have valid claims stemming from a 2018 refinancing, but that he would wait on the company's auction results before giving them the go-ahead to sue.

  • July 06, 2020

    Insurance Cases To Watch In The 2nd Half Of 2020

    Trial courts around the country will have their hands full this year unraveling hundreds of lawsuits over insurance coverage for financial losses during the COVID-19 pandemic, while state high courts are primed to address thorny issues like whether U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission disgorgement payments are insurable.

  • July 06, 2020

    Loeb & Loeb, Davis Polk Guide $769M SPAC Merger

    Special purpose acquisition company Orisun, represented by Loeb & Loeb, said Monday it is merging with Davis Polk-led Chinese coworking space business Ucommune in a deal valuing the new group at $769 million.

  • July 06, 2020

    Top State And Local Tax Policies Of 2020: Midyear Report

    The unexpected displacement of workforces by the COVID-19 pandemic, the acceleration of taxation of the digital world and continued post-Wayfair adaptation were just some of the state and local tax trends in the first half of the year. Here, Law360 looks at five policy developments that stood out.

  • July 06, 2020

    Paul Weiss-Led Apollo Launches $12B Lending Platform

    Alternative asset management firm Apollo Global Management, advised by Paul Weiss, announced Monday that it has launched a new $12 billion lending platform specializing in large scale loans with the help of the United Arab Emirates' Weil-advised sovereign wealth fund Mubadala Investment Co.

  • July 06, 2020

    Avenatti's Freedom Extended Ahead Of Calif. Embezzling Trial

    The California federal judge overseeing Michael Avenatti's December embezzlement trial extended his temporary release from a Manhattan prison following his conviction for extorting Nike, giving him 60 more days of freedom Monday despite federal prosecutors' concerns that the embattled attorney violated bail conditions.

  • July 06, 2020

    NYPD Cops Sue Over Off-Duty Security Work Pay

    Thousands of New York City Police Department officers have sued the city, the department and businesses participating in a paid off-duty security program, claiming in New York federal court that they routinely fail to pay timely wages or compensate cops at all for their work.

  • July 06, 2020

    Epstein's Ex Awaits Bail Hearing From Brooklyn Jail Cell

    British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell awaited a bail hearing from a Brooklyn, New York, jail cell Monday after her arrest in New Hampshire on charges of helping deceased financier Jeffrey Epstein sexually abuse minor girls.

  • July 06, 2020

    Elliott Pushes For Changes To Crown Castle's Fiber Business

    Activist investor Elliott Management Corp. is urging changes at Crown Castle after its affiliates amassed a $1 billion economic interest in the telecommunications company, saying Monday that its investments in fiber have significantly underperformed.

  • July 02, 2020

    Law360 Names Top Attorneys Under 40

    We're pleased to announce Law360's Rising Stars for 2020, our list of 176 attorneys under 40 whose legal accomplishments transcend their age.

  • July 03, 2020

    Trump's Niece Claims She Was Duped By President's Fraud

    President Donald Trump's niece, who is fighting to release her purportedly damning tell-all book about her family, said Thursday that the president and his siblings fraudulently induced her to enter a nondisclosure agreement based on their bogus estimates of her stake in the Trump empire.

  • July 02, 2020

    NY Appeals Manafort Fraud Suit Axed As Double Jeopardy

    The Manhattan district attorney urged a New York appellate court Thursday to revive a state criminal mortgage fraud case against the president's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, arguing that the state charges are distinct from federal charges he's currently serving time for and aren't grounds for double jeopardy.

  • July 02, 2020

    US Atty In EDNY To Depart For Main Justice Role

    Richard Donoghue is leaving his post as U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York to take a job at the U.S. Department of Justice headquarters, a development that comes on the heels of the messy recent ouster of Donoghue's Manhattan-based colleague Geoffrey Berman.

  • July 02, 2020

    SDNY Trial Of Banker Tied To Manafort Is Delayed

    A New York federal judge on Thursday delayed at least until December the trial of a banker accused of attempting to bribe Trump campaign boss Paul Manafort with $16 million in loans in exchange for a shot at working in the administration.

  • July 02, 2020

    NY Judge Axes Standard Chartered FCA Suit At Feds' Request

    A New York federal judge has dismissed a whistleblower suit accusing Standard Chartered Bank of lying to U.S. authorities to shave billions of dollars from what it allegedly should have paid for violations of Iran sanctions, granting a government request that he said he had "no difficulty" deeming well-founded.

  • July 02, 2020

    Alcoa Says Contract Fight With AB InBev Must Be Litigated

    Aluminum giant Alcoa is urging a New York federal court not to force it to arbitrate a patent dispute relating to a type of aluminum used in Anheuser-Busch InBev bottles, arguing that the brewer is targeting the wrong company due to a 2016 corporate restructuring.

  • July 02, 2020

    Platinum Receiver Settles With Insurers For $14M

    The receiver for defunct hedge fund Platinum Partners agreed to pay around $14 million to settle with insurers that say Platinum owed them more than $44 million, a move the receiver said eliminated one of the biggest obstacles to investors finally recouping some of their losses.

  • July 02, 2020

    Netflix Can't 'Hide' Behind Dramatization, Ex-Prosecutor Says

    The creators of a docudrama about the Central Park jogger rape case deliberately cast the then-head of the Manhattan district attorney's sex crimes unit as an "unmistakable villain," lawyers for the former official told a Florida federal judge Wednesday.

  • July 02, 2020

    Judge Pans NY Defenses In Uber Drivers' Fight For Benefits

    The Brooklyn federal judge handling Uber, Lyft and other app-based drivers' legal battle for New York unemployment benefits appeared to take the drivers' side during a case hearing Thursday morning, as she repeatedly laid into the Empire State's arguments against immediate court intervention.

  • July 02, 2020

    5 Sports & Betting Cases To Watch: Midyear Report

    Attorneys are set to tackle a number of lingering legal issues in the second half of the year, such as a reexamination of NCAA rules prohibiting college athletes from earning money and novel, pandemic-created disputes including fans demanding refunds for canceled games.

  • July 02, 2020

    Latham-Led AI Insurance Site Prices Upsized $319M IPO

    Renters and home insurance provider Lemonade's shares traded Thursday in an upsized $319 million initial public offering with shares peaking 144% above the offering price, in a deal advised on by Latham & Watkins LLP and White & Case LLP.

  • July 02, 2020

    Coronavirus Litigation: The Week In Review

    Grocery delivery service Instacart is suing to block a Seattle ordinance requiring coronavirus hazard pay for gig delivery workers, New York police officers and Las Vegas resort workers claim they haven't been provided with adequate protections during the pandemic, and the ACLU says California courts can't block public access to trials, despite the virus. 

  • July 02, 2020

    Entrepreneur Who Gave Tips On Dad's Pharma Co. Gets Year

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced entrepreneur Telemaque Lavidas on Thursday to a year and a day in prison for insider trading, after a jury convicted him of passing secrets to a trader friend about Ariad Pharmaceuticals, where his father sat on the board.

Expert Analysis

  • Cybersecurity Steps For Law Firms Amid Heightened Risks

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    With large swaths of the population indoors and primarily online, cybercriminals will be able to exploit law firms more easily now than ever before, but some basic precautions can help, says Joel Wallenstrom at Wickr.

  • Madoff Recovery's Next Steps After Justices' Petition Pass

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent refusal to review a Second Circuit decision allowing recovery of funds Bernie Madoff transferred outside the U.S. leaves open the question of whether the clawback initiative’s claims will survive given the strict pleading and proof standards that have evolved over the last 12 years of litigation, say attorneys at Quarles & Brady.

  • 10 Key Considerations For Commercial Leases After COVID-19

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    Negotiating commercial leases after COVID-19 will require careful attention to many issues arising from both landlords' and tenants' new priorities, as well as government regulations, say Cynthia Keliher and Jonathan Pizarro-Ross at McCarter & English.

  • Opinion

    High Court Should Review Goldman's Maintenance Theory

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    Now that the full Second Circuit has denied rehearing in Arkansas Teacher Retirement System v. Goldman Sachs, the U.S. Supreme Court should review the flawed theory that misstatements can affect stock prices simply by maintaining preexisting inflation, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • An Inside Look At DOJ Fight Against COVID-19 Price-Gouging

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    New Jersey U.S. Attorney Craig Carpenito and Assistant U.S. Attorney Nicholas Grippo share how the U.S. Department of Justice is combating hoarding and price-gouging of medical supplies and analyze some of the prosecutions a new task force has brought during the pandemic.

  • Opinion

    It's Time For Law Firms To Support Work-From-Home Culture

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    Now that law firms are on board with fully remote work environments, they must develop policies that match in-office culture and align partner and associate expectations, says Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • Opinion

    Republicans Keep Confirming Unqualified Judicial Nominees

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    What emerges from the group of 200 federal judges confirmed by the Senate under President Donald Trump is a judiciary stacked with young conservative ideologues, many of whom lack basic judicial qualifications, says Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

  • Tips For Crafting The Perfect Law Firm Alert

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    As lawyers have had more time to write in recent weeks, the number of law firm alerts has increased massively, but a lot of them fail to capture readers and deliver new business, says Richard Torrenzano at The Torrenzano Group.

  • Retail Security Policies And The Risk Of Discrimination

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    Recent announcements from Walmart, CVS and Walgreens that certain multicultural products will no longer be kept under lock and key on sales floors should be a reminder for all retailers to evaluate whether their security policies could be grounds for allegations of discrimination, say Carl Schaerf and Gary Smith at Schnader Harrison.

  • A Close Look At High Court's DACA Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last week vacating the Trump administration's rescission of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is important for future Administrative Procedure Act jurisprudence, says professor Bill Hing at the University of San Francisco.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Elrod Reviews 'Shortlisted'

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    Renee Knake Jefferson and Hannah Brenner Johnson's new book, "Shortlisted: Women in the Shadows of the Supreme Court," is a service to an overlooked group of nine women who were considered for the U.S. Supreme Court before Justice Sandra Day O'Connor was confirmed, and offers constructive tips for women looking to break through the glass ceiling, says Fifth Circuit Judge Jennifer Elrod.

  • Mandatory State Bars Likely To Remain Intact, For Now

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    A Texas federal judge’s recent holding in McDonald v. Sorrels that mandatory bar memberships do not violate members' constitutional rights indicates that such requirements survive the U.S. Supreme Court's 2018 decision in Janus, but it may mean that the Supreme Court will address the issue in the not-too-distant future, say Majed Nachawati and Misty Farris at Fears Nachawati.

  • Contract Renegotiation Vs. Litigation In Wake Of COVID-19

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    While contract provisions such as force majeure and frustration of purpose are intended to be used as defenses in litigation, companies impacted by the pandemic can leverage such defenses to renegotiate contracts rather than litigate their outstanding obligations, say Edward Tillinghast and Jacqueline Simonovich at Sheppard Mullin.

  • COVID-19 Triage Rules Raise Dilemmas For Health Providers

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    The current pandemic is forcing health care providers and some states to adopt triage guidelines in order to allocate limited resources among patients, but these rules must be carefully crafted to satisfy both legal and ethical concerns, say Keti Mebuke and Stephen Moore at Hinshaw & Culbertson.

  • What Landlords Should Consider Before Reopening Gyms

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    As the U.S. gradually emerges from quarantine, commercial landlords of properties with gyms should assess their obligations to reopen, and whether they can comply with public health regulations and remain financially viable while doing so, say Angie Daniele and Patrick Abell at Thompson Hine.

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