Technology

  • June 29, 2020

    Calif. University Says It Paid $1.14M In Ransomware Attack

    The University of California, San Francisco said Friday that it paid hackers $1.14 million earlier this month to resolve a ransomware attack and unlock encrypted data on servers within the School of Medicine, an incident that reflects a growing number of malware attacks.

  • June 29, 2020

    Gilstrap Rejects Plea To Postpone Samsung Trial Over Virus

    Eastern District of Texas Judge Rodney Gilstrap on Monday rejected a patent owner's request to postpone next week's jury trial in its case against Samsung as COVID-19 cases surge in Texas, saying that doing so would be unfair to Samsung and delay the case for many months.

  • June 29, 2020

    Simpson, Gibson Aid Blackstone's $1.65B Studio Investment

    Simpson Thacher represented Blackstone in connection with its purchase of a minority stake in a trio of Hollywood studios from Gibson Dunn-counseled Hudson Pacific Properties in a deal that values the properties at $1.65 billion, a transaction the companies announced on Monday.

  • June 29, 2020

    Justices Won't Stop PTAB From Overruling Trial Courts

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to review the Federal Circuit's rule that Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions invalidating patents can override infringement judgments by district courts.

  • June 26, 2020

    Judge Wary Of Clash Over Firings By Prez's Global Media CEO

    An internet freedom nonprofit is gunning to overturn a newly installed Trump appointee's sudden firings of top executives and advisory board members of federally funded international broadcasters, but a D.C. federal judge expressed uncertainty over whether she has the authority to resolve the matter and suggested Congress might have to step in.

  • June 26, 2020

    DHS Tells Social Media Sites To Police Protest Posts

    The acting head of the Department of Homeland Security has sent letters to Facebook, Twitter, Snap, Google and Apple asking them to stop people from using their platforms to "organize, facilitate or incite dangerous or deadly riots" in the wake of police brutality protests across the country.

  • June 26, 2020

    Surveillance Reformers Seize Moment Amid Protests, Virus

    A growing movement for police reform and added scrutiny of privacy in the age of COVID-19 have combined to add momentum to the push for limits on government surveillance.  

  • June 26, 2020

    Health Chain, Patients Reach $2.8M Data Breach Deal

    A multihospital health system has agreed to shell out $2.8 million to put to rest a proposed class action over two phishing attacks that allegedly compromised the personal information of more than a million patients, according to a motion for preliminary approval filed in Wisconsin federal court.

  • June 26, 2020

    Chinese Prof Guilty Of Economic Espionage Over Phone Tech

    A professor at a Chinese university was found guilty of economic espionage, theft of trade secrets and conspiracy on Friday in California federal court following a bench trial over allegations he stole trade secrets from Avago Technologies and Skyworks Solutions Inc.

  • June 26, 2020

    EDTX Judge OKs Special Laptops In Apple Case Due To Virus

    Citing the pandemic, an Eastern District of Texas federal judge has given the green light to a novel way to review source code that was specially developed by Apple during its wide-ranging patent dispute with Maxell.

  • June 26, 2020

    Group Asks Court To Pause LA's Minority Pot Licensing

    A group whose bids for Los Angeles social equity cannabis licenses were rejected at an early stage has renewed its effort to pause the city's processing of applications while they pursue a do-over of what they allege was a botched and unfair system for awarding the licenses.

  • June 26, 2020

    Norton Rose Nabs BakerHostetler Cybersecurity & Privacy Pro

    Norton Rose Fulbright has hired a seasoned BakerHostetler data protection, privacy and cybersecurity lawyer as a partner in its Houston office, where he will focus on incident response, risk mitigation and compliance.

  • June 26, 2020

    Calif. Gov. Urged To Scrap July 1 Start For CCPA Enforcement

    A leading advertising trade group is taking its fight to temporarily halt enforcement of California's Consumer Privacy Act to the state's governor, arguing that the attorney general's pending regulations on how companies should implement the law contain unconstitutional requirements that exceed the regulator's authority.

  • June 26, 2020

    UK Worries Taboola, Outbrain Tie-Up Could Hurt Publishers

    British competition authorities said Friday they want some concessions to ease antitrust worries before they let online content marketer Taboola gobble up rival Outbrain, saying the deal could hurt publishers.

  • June 26, 2020

    Claims Court Denies 7 Protests Over $7.5B DOD Tech Deal

    A Court of Federal Claims judge has tossed seven challenges to the Defense Information Systems Agency's choice of contractors for a $7.5 billion information technology deal, saying DISA had fairly vetted applicants and reasonably chosen the winning bidders.

  • June 26, 2020

    Amazon To Buy Self-Driving Startup Zoox

    Amazon jumped into the arena of self-driving cars Friday when it announced an agreement to buy California-based Zoox, a startup designing autonomous ride-hailing vehicles that can be called with a smartphone app.

  • June 26, 2020

    Coronavirus Q&A: MoFo's Global Privacy Group Co-Chair

    In this edition of Coronavirus Q&A, Morrison & Foerster LLP partner Miriam H. Wugmeister digs into growing concerns among in-house counsel about the increased personal data they'll likely need to collect to safely reopen their businesses and how her homebound colleagues and clients are teaming up to fight hackers remotely.

  • June 26, 2020

    9th Circ. Won't Save LG, Samsung Workers' Antitrust Suit

    A group of LG and Samsung workers has failed to persuade the Ninth Circuit to breathe new life into their claims that the mobile tech giants used no-poach deals to stand in the way of labor competition.

  • June 26, 2020

    Ericsson Gets $2.4M Tab After $110M Win Axed At Fed. Circ.

    After the Federal Circuit erased its $110 million win earlier this year, Ericsson has been ordered to pay Chinese smartphone maker TCL Communications $2.4 million by a Texas federal judge who ruled that it was liable for some of the costs TCL incurred in the companies' patent dispute.

  • June 26, 2020

    COVID-19 IP Catch-Up: Mask Sales & Remote Source Codes

    A Texas federal judge authorized a novel way of reviewing source code during the pandemic, mask makers are still bringing trademark suits, and patent litigation between drugmakers in New York is finally ready to go to trial. Here are some recent intellectual property updates tied to the outbreak that you may have missed.

  • June 26, 2020

    JPMorgan Can't Beat DOL's Gender Pay Bias Suit

    A U.S. Department of Labor administrative law judge shut down JPMorgan's attempt to score an early win in a lawsuit by the agency's enforcement unit claiming the investment bank paid female employees less than their male counterparts when carrying out its government contracts.

  • June 26, 2020

    Embedding Social Media Suddenly Looks Risky For Websites

    Recent copyright rulings have prompted Instagram to clarify that websites should not "embed" posts without first clearing "all necessary rights," potentially forcing a major change in how digital media companies approach social media.

  • June 26, 2020

    5 Tech And Life Sciences Cos. Raise Nearly $1B Total In IPOs

    Five tech and life sciences companies, spanning from Chinese software and cryptocurrency mining companies to North American drug developers, made their public markets debuts Friday after raising nearly $1 billion in combined initial public offerings, capping a busy week for IPOs.

  • June 26, 2020

    Qualcomm Wants Investor Suit Over Broadcom Deal Nixed

    Qualcomm Inc. asked a California federal judge Thursday to dismiss a proposed class action that claims the company misled investors about a possible takeover, calling shareholders' arguments a "distraction" that doesn't make the case that the company lied to or misled them.

  • June 26, 2020

    Gartner Sues Insurer Over $340M Event Cancellation Coverage

    Global research firm Gartner Inc. sued U.S Specialty Insurance Co. in New York federal court, seeking up to $340 million in coverage from canceled events because of COVID-19, alleging the insurer breached its policy terms by avoiding paying for its loss.

Expert Analysis

  • Where We Are In The US Trade Secret Crackdown On China

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    As the U.S. Department of Justice continues to focus on prosecuting trade secret theft by China, U.S. companies are also filing private civil lawsuits against Chinese companies in federal courts, relying on both the Defend Trade Secrets Act and state trade secret laws, say attorneys at Wiggin and Dana.

  • Opinion

    Don't Cancel Your Summer Associate Programs

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    While pulling off an effective summer associate program this year will be no easy feat, law firms' investments in their future attorneys should be considered necessary even during this difficult time, says Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • Tech Will Play Key Role In Real Estate's Road To Recovery

    Excerpt from Lexis Practice Advisor
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    With unprecedented stress on real estate operations due to the COVID-19 crisis, this is a time to reflect on the property technology industry's success in recent years and to recognize how those models can be used to rebuild for the future, say attorneys at Goodwin.

  • Tips For Spoliation Claims In Trade Secret Cases

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    As businesses move toward the complete digitization of information, spoliation issues are increasingly arising in the context of trade secret litigation, and a recent California federal court's decision in WeRide v. Huang is a great example of how plaintiffs can use spoliation offensively to obtain a win, say attorneys at Arent Fox.

  • Early Securities Litigation Trends Stemming From Recent IPOs

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    Attorneys at WilmerHale analyze Securities Act complaints against companies that went public immediately prior to and during the COVID-19-induced market volatility, providing preliminary insights into whether, when and on what basis recent issuers are facing securities litigation.

  • New Trend In IPR Institution Appealability Demands Scrutiny

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    While a recent trend of federal courts holding that U.S. Patent and Trademark Office decisions instituting inter partes reviews are not appealable requires close following, there are two remedies practitioners can seek apart from appeal, say Brett Cooper and Kevin Schubert at McKool Smith.

  • The Legal Risks Of Bias In Artificial Intelligence

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    Bias in artificial intelligence algorithms is inevitable, so companies that use AI should take proactive steps to avoid disparate impact on legally protected classes and minimize the risk of lawsuits, say Brig. Gen. Patrick Huston at the Army JAG Corps and Lourdes Fuentes-Slater at Karta Legal.

  • 5 Ways To Reduce Post-Pandemic Legal Malpractice Exposure

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    History suggests that legal malpractice claims will rise following the current economic downturn, and while a certain percentage of the claims will be unavoidable, there are prophylactic steps that law firms can take, says John Johnson at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Opinion

    Justices Should Construe Computer Fraud Law Narrowly

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    In U.S. v. Van Buren, the U.S. Supreme Court should follow burglary and trespass cases to limit the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act’s scope to accessing or misusing employer data and avoid the absurd result of criminalizing an employee's unauthorized Facebook visit, say Anthony Volini and Karen Heart at DePaul University.

  • Using The M&A Slowdown To Prepare A Portfolio Co. For Sale

    Excerpt from Lexis Practice Advisor
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    Dealmakers can take advantage of COVID-19’s dampening effect on M&A activity to work through timing, pandemic considerations and sale process coordination for portfolio company sales so their deals will be ready when the market eventually picks back up, say Michael Gilligan and Caitlin Cornell at Schulte Roth.

  • Opinion

    Credibility Concerns About Virtual Arbitration Are Unfounded

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    Concerns that videoconferenced arbitration hearings compromise an arbitrator's ability to reliably resolve credibility contests are based on mistaken perceptions of how many cases actually turn on credibility, what credibility means in the legal world, and how arbitrators make credibility determinations, says Wayne Brazil at JAMS.

  • Opinion

    Google's Fair Use Defense At High Court Is Disingenuous

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    Because strong copyright protection does not hinder interoperability, Google’s argument in its U.S. Supreme Court case against Oracle that all application programming interfaces are subject to fair use should not prevail, says James Skyles at Skyles Law Group.

  • CFIUS Proposal May Disproportionately Hit Certain Countries

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    A recent Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States proposal would change the trigger for mandatory CFIUS filing from industry group designation to nationality-based export controls, facilitating investment from favored countries while discouraging investment from others, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • CCPA Is 1 Of Many Retailer Data Privacy Class Action Worries

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    As class actions targeting the sale of consumer data pose an increasing threat to retailers under the California Consumer Privacy Act and other states’ consumer protection laws, companies must ensure compliance with each statute and assess their vulnerability to deceptive conduct allegations, say Stephanie Sheridan and Meegan Brooks at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • A Lawyer's Guide To Client Service Continuity Planning

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    Ensuring uninterrupted client service and compliance with ethical obligations in a time when attorneys are more likely to fall ill means taking six basic — yet often ignored — steps to build some redundancy and internal communication into legal practice, say attorneys at Axinn.

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