Technology

  • July 09, 2020

    Deals Rumor Mill: Ant Financial, Washington Football, CVC

    The fintech unit of Alibaba may seek a $200 billion valuation in its IPO, three minority owners of the NFL’s Washington team are mulling a sale of their stakes, and CVC has secured €21.3 billion for its latest fund. Here, Law360 breaks down these and other deal rumors from the past week that you need to be aware of.

  • July 09, 2020

    Investors Ink $3M Deal In Taiwanese Co. Trade Secrets Suit

    Counsel for investors of United Microelectronics Corp. informed a New York federal judge Wednesday that they inked a $3 million deal in a stock-drop suit against the Taiwanese semiconductor manufacturer, in which they alleged the company lied about stealing trade secrets from an American competitor.

  • July 09, 2020

    Justices Set To Rattle TCPA Landscape With Autodialer Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday jumped into the raging debate over what qualifies as an autodialer under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, a move that's widely expected to determine whether robocall and text message litigation that exposes companies to hefty statutory penalties dries up or continues to boom.

  • July 09, 2020

    UK And Australia Privacy Watchdogs Probe AI Firm Clearview

    British and Australian privacy regulators on Thursday announced an investigation into facial recognition company Clearview AI, focusing on its use of "scraped" data and biometrics of individuals.

  • July 09, 2020

    Video Platforms Can Withhold IP Infringers' Contact Info

    YouTube and other online platforms only have to provide the postal address — but not the email, phone number or IP address — of users who illegally upload movies without the copyright holder's consent, the European Union's highest court ruled Thursday.

  • July 09, 2020

    Quick Decision Coming In Harvard, MIT Visa Restriction Suit

    A federal judge said Thursday she is looking to decide by July 15 whether student immigrants attending Harvard University and MIT can be denied entry into the U.S. if their colleges go fully online due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • July 09, 2020

    Lenovo Wins Round In Bid To Patent 'Card Clash' Invention

    A judge has reversed a decision by the U.K.'s Intellectual Property Office that blocked a patent application filed by Chinese technology giant Lenovo for handling contactless transactions involving more than one payment card, saying on Thursday that the invention went beyond a standard computer process.

  • July 08, 2020

    Coinbase Hires Ex-Facebook Deputy GC Grewal As Top Atty

    Ex-Facebook deputy general counsel Paul Grewal, a former magistrate judge in the Northern District of California, has joined Coinbase as its new chief legal officer, the cryptocurrency exchange said Wednesday.

  • July 08, 2020

    Alsup Rips Feds' 'Mumbo Jumbo' In Russian's Hacking Trial

    U.S. District Judge William Alsup expressed frustration Wednesday with a federal prosecutor's attempt to tie online personas to a Russian national on trial over 2012 cyberattacks on LinkedIn and Dropbox, calling the government's efforts "mumbo jumbo" and wondering aloud whether prosecutors were wasting the jury's time.

  • July 08, 2020

    Fed. Circ. Sends Wearable Tech IP Back To PTAB In Fitbit Fight

    The Federal Circuit on Wednesday gave Fitbit a second chance to invalidate claims of a Valencell patent for monitoring information like blood oxygen level and heart rate, and refused to narrow when joined parties can appeal Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions.

  • July 08, 2020

    CFAA Needs To Stay Narrow To Fight Hackers, High Court Told

    Mozilla, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and several nonprofit advocacy groups are among those urging the U.S. Supreme Court to rein in an Eleventh Circuit ruling that broadly construed the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, arguing that criminalizing activity that violates companies' network usage rules would hurt vital work to combat cyber threats. 

  • July 08, 2020

    Fed. Circ. Mulls Whether Apple's IP Fight With Voip-Pal Is Moot

    A Federal Circuit panel on Wednesday considered whether Apple's appeal of Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions upholding two Voip-Pal.com call routing patents is rendered moot by a March decision in a related matter that affirmed the invalidation of 20 claims of the two patents as abstract.

  • July 08, 2020

    Revised CRT Deals Totaling $521M Get OK Despite Objections

    A California federal judge said Wednesday he'll approve revised settlements totaling more than $521 million to resolve price-fixing claims by indirect purchasers of cathode ray tubes against Samsung and other electronics companies, despite objections from certain CRT buyers who claim they were wrongly excluded from the settlement class.

  • July 08, 2020

    Rhapsody, iHeart Dropped From Music Industry Boycott Suit

    A music rights organization run by a 21-year-old self-described "musical prodigy" dropped its group boycott allegations Wednesday against iHeartMedia, a week after dropping claims against Rhapsody that still remain pending against Apple, Amazon, Google, Spotify and others, including music licensing coordinators.

  • July 08, 2020

    PayPal Urges Arbitration Approval To End Charity Class Suit

    PayPal Inc. asked an Illinois federal judge Wednesday to enter judgment on an arbitrator's award in its favor to end a proposed class action challenging the way the company distributes charitable donations.

  • July 08, 2020

    PayPal's Prepaid Rule Protest 'Distorts' Purpose, CFPB Says

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said that PayPal Inc. has distorted the reasons the agency adopted its prepaid card rule and its scope, as it seeks to end the online payments company's attempt to invalidate the rule.

  • July 08, 2020

    Tesla Wants 'Autopilot' Pedestrian Death Suit Moved To Japan

    Tesla said Wednesday that Japan, not California, is the proper venue for a wrongful death suit from the family of a Japanese man who was the first pedestrian killed in a Tokyo accident involving a Tesla vehicle engaged in Autopilot, Tesla's automated driving function.

  • July 08, 2020

    Facebook Suit Can Bring Clarity To Autodialers, Justices Told

    A lawsuit against Facebook over text messages provides an opening for the U.S. Supreme Court to mend a growing circuit split over how federal law defines illegal robocalls, a man suing the company told the justices Wednesday.

  • July 08, 2020

    DOD Acquisition Chief Wants Industrial Capacity 'Reshored'

    The U.S. Department of Defense's acquisition chief said Wednesday that she would like to "reshore" as much of the DOD's overseas supply chain as possible, saying the COVID-19 pandemic had highlighted vulnerabilities in the defense industrial base.

  • July 08, 2020

    OFCCP Secures $820K In Settlements Over Race Bias Claims

    The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs has announced it reached more than $820,000 in settlements with two technology companies in Texas and California over allegations that they discriminated against job applicants based on their race.

  • July 08, 2020

    Tech Consultant Fights AT&T's Attempt To Nix Theft Suit

    A two-time Emmy Award-winning media and technology consultant asked a California federal judge Tuesday to keep his suit against AT&T alive, alleging he followed the law in informing the wireless provider that its employees had helped hackers steal $1.9 million in cryptocurrency from him.

  • July 08, 2020

    WeWork Sued For Using Black Worker As 'Window Dressing'

    Two former employees hit WeWork with discrimination suits Wednesday in New York state court, with one calling her experience as a Black woman at the company "horrendous" and the other — a former member of the diversity and inclusion team — saying he was used as "window dressing."

  • July 08, 2020

    Fed. Circ.'s Arthrex Fix Was Wrong, Polaris Tells High Court

    Polaris Innovations Ltd. is the latest to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in on the Federal Circuit's purported fix in its Arthrex ruling that makes it easier for Patent Trial and Appeal Board judges to be fired, saying the "swords" above the judges' heads now "hang by thinner threads."

  • July 08, 2020

    DC Circ. Orders Release Of Secret Surveillance Records

    A D.C. Circuit panel has ordered a district judge to unseal electronic surveillance records and related materials in closed federal criminal investigations, undoing a lower court's order that blocks a reporter and a media advocacy group from accessing the long-sought information.

  • July 08, 2020

    Brown Rudnick, Crosbie Gliner Guide GCP's $125M HQ Sale

    Construction technology company GCP Applied Technologies said Wednesday it's selling its Cambridge, Massachusetts, headquarters to life science real estate company IQHQ Inc. for $125 million in a deal put together with help from Brown Rudnick LLP and Crosbie Gliner Schiffman Southard & Swanson LLP.

Expert Analysis

  • Are Your Slack Communications Primed For E-Discovery?

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    With the increasing use of channel-based platforms such as Slack, Messenger and Teams in the work-from-home era, companies should assume they may be compelled to produce channel-based data in litigation and take proactive steps to protect sensitive information, say Jessica Brown and Collin James Vierra at Gibson Dunn.

  • 6 Dispute Prevention Steps As Lawsuits Rise Amid Pandemic

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    With the inundation of lawsuits resulting from the pandemic, now is an opportune time for companies and their advisers to implement prevention measures explicitly designed to break the dispute cycle early and to de-escalate possible legal actions as they form, says arbitrator and mediator Janice Sperow.

  • Trump's Social Media Order May Not Go Far

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    Because courts have a history of interpreting the Communications Decency Act's Section 230 immunity broadly, President Donald Trump’s executive order targeting social media company protections will likely have little real effect, and a recent challenge in federal court stands on solid legal ground, says Genelle Belmas at the University of Kansas.

  • COVID-19 Telehealth Boom Demands Better Privacy Practices

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    With demand for telemedicine skyrocketing during the pandemic, health care providers should not be lulled into complacency regarding data privacy simply because the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has relaxed its standards, as pre-pandemic practices may be inadequate, says Geoffrey Lottenberg at Berger Singerman.

  • Opinion

    Time To Consider Percentage Rental Agreements For Lawyers

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    It has long been the law that attorneys cannot use percentage rental agreements because doing so would constitute an impermissible sharing of fees with nonlawyers, but such arrangements can help lawyers match expenses with revenues in lean times like now, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson at Holland & Knight.

  • Altera Could Bolster State Transfer Pricing Scrutiny

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    The reasoning of the Ninth Circuit's Altera v. Commissioner decision — which the U.S. Supreme Court recently declined to review — could provide state tax authorities with an argument for additional discretion when challenging transfer pricing arrangements between affiliated entities, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • 'Settle And Sue' Malpractice Cases Have New Clarity In Calif.

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    A California state appellate court's recent decision in Masellis v. Law Office of Leslie F. Jensen provides a road map for proving causation and damages in settle-and-sue legal malpractice cases — an important issue of long-standing confusion, says Steven Berenson at Klinedinst.

  • A Guide To West Texas Patent Cases Before Albright: Part 1

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    Patent litigants must become familiar with the unique procedures of the Western District of Texas under Judge Alan Albright, who has already heard 18% of all nationwide patent infringement cases this year and is expected to hear more than 600 complaints by the end of 2020, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • A Midyear Look At Key US Sanctions Developments

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    During an active first half of 2020, the Office of Foreign Assets Control strengthened its sanctions programs, issued new guidance documents and announced several enforcement actions, underscoring that even during a pandemic, sanctions compliance is indispensable, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • How Calif. Privacy Rights Act Could Shape Privacy Landscape

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    If California voters support the California Privacy Rights Act in November, it will become a permanent baseline for California privacy law, increase the already demanding requirements of the California Consumer Privacy Act, and potentially redefine informational privacy for the entire U.S., say Lauren Kitces and Lydia de la Torre at Squire Patton.

  • What You Say In Online Mediation May Be Discoverable

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    Mediation conducted online with participants in different states makes it harder to determine where communications were made, increasing the risk that courts will apply laws of a state that does not protect mediation confidentiality, say mediators Jeff Kichaven and Teresa Frisbie and law student Tyler Codina.

  • Opinion

    Nonimmigrant Worker Ban Exceeds Presidential Authority

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    President Donald Trump's recent proclamation banning nonimmigrant workers from entering the U.S. overreaches by failing to include an exception for nonworking family members who pose no threat to U.S. jobs, says Jeffrey Gorsky at Berry Appleman.

  • Addressing Facial Recognition Tech's Discriminatory Potential

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    Recent civil rights groups' objections, industry statements and proposed bills on the use of facial recognition technology highlight several problematic concerns, including that it lacks accuracy in identifying nonwhite individuals and may play a role in racially discriminatory policing, say Laura Jehl and Kari Prochaska at McDermott.

  • Strategic Considerations For The Escalating SEP Battles

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    Recent developments in the standard-essential patent landscape affect licensing negotiations and litigation involving communications and networking technologies, and will lead to increased attention from regulators and potential inconsistencies among different agencies and forums, say Erik Puknys and Michelle Rice at Finnegan.

  • 10 Tips For A Successful Remote Arbitration Hearing

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    As I learned after completing a recent international arbitration remotely, with advance planning a video hearing can replicate the in-person experience surprisingly well, and may actually be superior in certain respects, says Kate Shih at Quinn Emanuel.

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