More Real Estate Coverage

  • December 07, 2022

    New Biden Plan Aims To Slash Federal Building Emissions

    The White House unveiled a plan on Wednesday to trim carbon emissions and improve energy efficiency in federally managed buildings, committing to cutting out direct greenhouse gas emissions in 30% of its buildings by 2030.

  • December 06, 2022

    $1.5B District Detroit Project Moves Forward With Local Input

    Local residents and businesses looking to continue living and operating in the heart of Detroit are cautiously optimistic about a proposed $1.5 billion mixed-use development by Olympia Development of Michigan LLC and The Related Cos. LP.

  • December 06, 2022

    Feds Say They Had Authority To Craft Pipeline Valve Rule

    Federal regulators pushed back on the assertion that a 2011 bill limited their ability to craft a rule requiring rupture-mitigation valves on some gathering pipelines, telling the D.C. Circuit on Monday that an industry challenge to the rule has no merit.

  • December 06, 2022

    IRS Corrects Labor Rules For Green Energy Tax Credits

    The Internal Revenue Service on Tuesday corrected initial guidance on the labor requirements that must be met to unlock bonus tax benefits for clean energy projects under the Democrats' landmark climate law.

  • December 05, 2022

    Ex-US Rep. Arrested In Atlanta After Venezuela Investigation

    Former U.S. Rep. David Rivera, a Florida Republican, was reportedly arrested Monday in Atlanta, the result of federal prosecutors' ongoing criminal investigation into his dealings with the Venezuelan government, according to news reports.

  • December 05, 2022

    Dem Lawmakers Propose Huge Investment In Indian Country

    Federal legislation unveiled on Monday would dramatically reshape the government's relations with Indigenous tribes, expanding support in areas such as public safety and health care, while ceding some issues — namely, the prosecution of on-reservation crimes — to Native leaders.

  • December 05, 2022

    Insurer Says La. Diocese Filed Damage Claims Too Late

    American Bankers Insurance Co. of Florida asked a Louisiana federal court Monday to toss a Roman Catholic diocese's more than $45 million hurricane damage suit against it and the National Flood Insurance Program, arguing the church filed its claims at the last minute and years too late.

  • December 05, 2022

    Starwood 2nd REIT In Week To Limit Investor Withdrawals

    Starwood Real Estate Investment Trust said this week it limited investor withdrawals in November after a surge in redemption requests.

  • December 05, 2022

    Ireland Publishes Tax Guidance For UK Property Transactions

    New capital gains tax guidance published by the Revenue Commissioners of Ireland contains information on the relief available to taxpayers who transfer land or buildings in the U.K. in light of its withdrawal from the European Union.

  • December 05, 2022

    The 2022 Law360 Pulse Prestige Leaders

    Check out our Prestige Leaders ranking, analysis and interactive graphics to see which firms stand out for their financial performance, attractiveness to attorneys, ability to secure accolades and positive legal news media representation.

  • December 02, 2022

    Loan Co. Says HUD Wrongly Gave $18M Contract To Rival

    A reverse mortgage loan servicer for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development asked the U.S. Court of Federal Claims to find that the agency wrongly awarded an $18 million contract to another company without a competitive process.

  • December 02, 2022

    Calif. Agency Approved Oil Wells Without Review, Group Says

    An environmental group says California's oil and gas regulator did not conduct any new reviews for 17 wells it greenlit in Los Angeles and Kern counties, urging a state court to void the approvals that the nonprofit says relied on decades-old, inadequate analyses.

  • December 02, 2022

    Biden Allowed To Consolidate Utah Monuments Suits

    President Joe Biden won a bid to consolidate two lawsuits accusing him and top administration officials of overstepping their authority when, last year, they restored a pair of Utah national monuments to their original size following reductions made by the Trump administration.

  • December 02, 2022

    Remote Alaska Village Urges 9th Circ. To Reject Land Swap

    Residents of a Native Alaskan village have asked the Ninth Circuit to overturn a federal land swap hundreds of miles to their south, stating the exchange could pave the way for a commercial road through a wildlife refuge that would disturb wild geese they depend on for subsistence.

  • December 02, 2022

    Offit Kurman Expands To California With LA Firm Merger

    Maryland-based Offit Kurman Attorneys At Law said it has merged with Los Angeles boutique firm Clark Trevithick, adding 15 more attorneys to its portfolio.

  • December 01, 2022

    ​​​​​​​Ex-Loan Officer Says PHH Mortgage Underpaid OT

    A former loan officer for PHH Mortgage Corp. hit the company with a proposed class and collective action on Thursday, alleging the New Jersey-based mortgage lender doesn't calculate overtime wages correctly and has failed to pay employees what they are owed under labor laws.

  • December 01, 2022

    US Construction Spending Fell In October, Report Shows

    Overall construction spending across the country declined 0.3% in October, although nonresidential public spending in areas such as education saw increases, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Thursday.

  • December 01, 2022

    Pair Admit Bribing Pacific Atoll Politicians In Shady Biz Plot

    A Chinese entrepreneur and his assistant copped Thursday in Manhattan federal court to bribing political officials in the Republic of the Marshall Islands after prosecutors said they planned to turn a faraway Marshallese atoll into a semi-autonomous business zone.

  • November 30, 2022

    9th Circ. Rehearing To Explore 1980 Alaska Conservation Law

    The Ninth Circuit has indicated that the full bench plans to delve into the Carter-era Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act as it mulls the legality of a proposed land swap between the federal government and a Native Alaskan village.

  • November 30, 2022

    Local Gov'ts Dig Deep To Tackle Regs For Bitcoin Mining

    Bitcoin mines tend to drive up energy costs and generate loud noises that can irritate neighbors, but governments increasingly are regulating them to the point that some think the industry could move the needle on renewable energy.

  • November 30, 2022

    Wash. City Offers To Pay $300K To End Tribe's Cleanup Suit

    The city of Yakima, Washington, on Wednesday offered to pay nearly $300,000 to reimburse the Yakama Nation for its work cleaning up a former city landfill in an effort to end a lawsuit over the project.

  • November 30, 2022

    FERC OKs Grid Operator's Plan To Speed Up Project Hookups

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has approved an overhaul of the largest regional grid operator's policies for connecting new power projects, though one commissioner questioned whether reforms will be enough to unclog a backlog of thousands of renewable energy projects trying to get onto the grid.

  • November 30, 2022

    Justices Ponder 'Drive-By' Take On Jurisdiction In Title Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday examined whether its prior pronouncements regarding the Quiet Title Act's statute of limitations bar federal courts from hearing a dispute over a remote Montana road.

  • November 30, 2022

    Dutch Court Nixes Damages Claims Over Coal Ban

    The Dutch government does not need to compensate German energy suppliers RWE and Uniper after enacting a plan to phase out coal power generation, a Dutch court ruled on Wednesday, saying the companies should have predicted that the ban would be passed if they did not reduce their emissions.

  • November 30, 2022

    Texas Appeals Court OKs Brownsville Natural Gas Facilities

    Construction for liquid natural gas facilities in Brownsville, Texas, can move forward as planned after the Thirteenth Court of Appeals upheld a lower court's ruling that the leases on the land were valid.

Expert Analysis

  • 3 Pricing Trends In Law Firm Use Of Litigation Funding

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    As BigLaw firms increasingly include litigation funding as a financing option for clients, internal pricing groups are taking the lead on standardizing and centralizing firm processes, and aggregating risk budgets, says Brendan Dyer at Woodsford Group.

  • Safeguarding Attorneys' Greatest Asset: Our Mental Health

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    Attorneys who understand that mental fitness is their most valuable characteristic should prioritize mental health care accordingly, including with certain activities they may not realize qualify as self-care, says Wendy Robbins at Holland & Knight.

  • IRS Starts Clock On Energy Projects' Labor Rule Exemption

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    A U.S. Department of the Treasury notice published this week started the 60-day clock for clean energy projects seeking to be grandfathered from having to meet new labor requirements to qualify for enhanced tax credits, and uncertainty about how the provisions will apply should be incentive for some investors to begin construction soon, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Law Schools Are Right To Steer Clear Of US News Rankings

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    By opting out of participating in the U.S. News & World Report annual rankings, law schools abandon a profoundly flawed system and free up their resources to adapt to the tsunami of changes overtaking the profession, says Nicholas Allard at Jacksonville University College of Law.

  • Litigation Funders Seek Transparency In Disclosure Debate

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    Litigation funders want to correct the record on calls for funding disclosure in the name of transparency, as this purported justification obscures the disclosure's adverse effects — prejudicing plaintiffs' cases and discouraging the assertion of meritorious legal claims, say Dai Wai Chin Feman and William Weisman at Parabellum Capital.

  • 5 Principles For Better Professional Development Programs

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    The pandemic and ensuing "great resignation" have resulted in a more transient legal work force, but law firms can use effective professional development programs to bridge a cultural gap with new associates and stem associate attrition, says Matthew Woods at Robins Kaplan.

  • My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Practice With Passion

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    First Circuit Judge Gustavo Gelpí recalls how Suffolk University Law School's Joseph Glannon taught the importance of the law as both a tool and a profession, and that those who wish to practice law successfully must do so with love, enthusiasm and passion.

  • ESA Listing Change Shows Conservation Partnership Benefits

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    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's recent decision to narrow the range of the gopher tortoise’s Endangered Species Act status demonstrates that public-private voluntary conservation partnerships can help leverage landowners' knowledge of their working lands to the benefit of species, the ecosystem and the landowners, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • State-Led Programs Can Speed Up Brownfield Development

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    Too often, publicly funded brownfields programs are not optimized to achieve redevelopment in the near term, but policymakers can address this problem by directing additional resources toward state-level brownfields programs that offer thoughtfully designed tax incentives and liability protection, says Gerald Pouncey at Morris Manning.

  • Questions To Ask Before Making A Lateral Move As Partner

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    Law firm partners considering lateral moves should diligently interview prospects — going beyond standard questions about compensation to inquire about culture, associate retention and other areas that can provide a more comprehensive view, says Lauren Wu at VOYLegal.

  • My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Argue Open-Mindedly

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    Queens College President Frank Wu reflects on how Yale Kamisar’s teaching and guidance at the University of Michigan Law School emphasized a capacity to engage with alternative worldviews and the importance of the ability to argue for both sides of a debate.

  • Outlook For Offshore Wind Development In The Gulf Of Mexico

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    Jana Grauberger and Stephen Wiegand at Liskow & Lewis discuss the current status of wind development in the Gulf of Mexico and the qualification requirements for holding offshore wind leases, and look ahead to potential effects that the Inflation Reduction Act may have on the offshore wind leasing timeline.

  • ABA's No-Contact Rule Advice Raises Questions For Lawyers

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    The American Bar Association's ethics committee recently issued two opinions concerning the no-contact rule — one creates an intuitive and practical default for electronic communications, while the other sets a potential trap for pro se lawyers, say Lauren Snyder and Deepika Ravi at HWG.