Residential

  • January 24, 2023

    New RealPage Antitrust Claims Emerge in Calif., Fla.

    A pair of antitrust lawsuits in Florida and California federal courts have joined a series of claims against RealPage Inc. and a group of the country's largest landlords in arguing the companies colluded to drive up rent prices and control the supply of units.

  • January 24, 2023

    3 Firms Shape Howard University's $300M Housing Financing

    Preston Hollow Community Capital announced Tuesday it has closed on $300 million in tax-exempt bond financing for several student dormitories at Howard University, in a deal guided by Orrick, Lerch Early and Mintz.

  • January 24, 2023

    NYC Says State Rules Hinder Basement Apartment Dreams

    A pilot program aimed at turning basements into legal apartments has highlighted steep regulatory costs and state-imposed lending limits that must be addressed if such conversions are to be feasible at scale, a New York City agency warned Tuesday.

  • January 24, 2023

    Texas AG Opens Investigation Into Co.'s Anti-Fraud TV Ads

    The Texas Attorney General's Office said Tuesday it is investigating anti-fraud services company Home Title Lock for potentially deceiving consumers about the pervasiveness of home title theft in ads targeting older adults.

  • January 24, 2023

    Real Estate Rumors: UBS, Bridge Industrial, Amzak

    UBS has reportedly sold a New York apartment tower for $115 million, Bridge Industrial is said to be close to a deal to buy an Illinois corporate campus and Amzak Capital Management is said to have loaned $20.5 million for a South Florida multifamily project.

  • January 24, 2023

    Conn. Contractor Owes $1.37M For Mixed-Use Build, Suit Says

    A subcontractor that constructed two new mixed-use buildings in Hartford, Connecticut, is demanding around $1.37 million or more after project leaders allegedly broke their contract by failing to pay for schedule changes and additional work, according to a federal lawsuit filed in the district of Connecticut.

  • January 24, 2023

    Siemens Liable For Miss. Water System Failure, Residents Say

    Residents of Jackson, Mississippi, told a court that Siemens Industry Inc. can't escape responsibility for its work on the city's water system that they say led the system into financial ruin ahead of an August collapse that deprived 150,000 people of drinking water for months.

  • January 24, 2023

    Fla. Condo Association, Insurer Settle $1M Water Damage Suit

    A Miami Beach condo association and its insurance company have settled a suit over an alleged $1 million worth of water damage from an October 2019 storm.

  • January 24, 2023

    NY Assembly Bill Again Seeks Pied-À-Terre Tax For NYC

    New York City could impose a pied-à-terre tax on residential buildings valued at more than $5 million under a bill introduced in the New York state Assembly.

  • January 24, 2023

    How Attys Are Advising Co-Op Boards Fearful Of Battery Fires

    When a lithium-ion battery exploded on the 20th floor of the Rivercourt apartments in Midtown East in November, causing 38 injuries, attorneys who represent cooperative and condominium boards say it also stoked fears about safety and liability.

  • January 23, 2023

    PNC Borrowers Score Partial Win In Post-Bankruptcy Suit

    A Michigan couple partly prevailed Monday in federal court on a key claim in their lawsuit accusing PNC Bank of failing to send certain required disclosures about their loan after they emerged from bankruptcy, although their bid to certify a class of borrowers under similar circumstances has failed. 

  • January 23, 2023

    Ga. Panel Revives Contract Breach Claims Against Bank

    The Georgia Court of Appeals on Monday revived a woman's breach of contract claims against Ameris Bank involving almost $100,000 in interest on a loan given to her for home renovations.

  • January 23, 2023

    Developers Nab $48M Loan To Build Fla. Build-To-Rent Homes

    Real estate firms Trusot Developments and Agador Spartacus Development clinched $48 million in financing to construct a build-to-rent project in Central Florida next to the largest retirement community in the country, said borrower-side broker JLL on Monday.

  • January 23, 2023

    Irish Land Seller Loses Appeal Of $45M Deal's Tax Treatment

    Ireland's tax authority had sufficient evidence to rule that a 3.6-acre parcel of land that sold for €42 million ($45.7 million) qualified as development property for capital gains tax purposes, the country's High Court ruled.

  • January 23, 2023

    Listing Service Asks 9th Circ. To Revive Realtor Antitrust Suit

    A real estate listing service claiming a policy from the National Association of Realtors runs afoul of antitrust laws asked the Ninth Circuit on Monday to revive its suit, saying the lower court erred by concluding that the smaller, competing listing platform lacked standing.

  • January 23, 2023

    Investors Say Fake Renovations Used To Run Ponzi Scheme

    Two real estate investors have accused multiple American investment companies of running a Ponzi scheme in which the companies would pay promised rental income with funds of other investors who believed they were paying for property renovations.

  • January 23, 2023

    Mont. Gov. Proposes $1B In Income, Property Tax Relief

    Montana would expand its business equipment tax exemption and provide roughly $1 billion in income and property tax relief under budget proposals put forward by the state's governor.

  • January 23, 2023

    Real Estate Co. Wants Out Of Mortgage Kickback Suit

    A North Carolina real estate agency is seeking to duck a proposed class action alleging it pushed clients toward a mortgage lender in exchange for kickbacks, telling a federal court that the homeowner plaintiffs lack standing to sue.

  • January 23, 2023

    NC Water Utility Settles Developers' Fee Dispute For $106M

    The city of Charlotte, North Carolina, agreed to pay $106 million to settle a lawsuit that alleged two single-family housing developers were overcharged fees to pay the costs of upgrading the city's public water and sewer system.

  • January 23, 2023

    Insurer Wants Stain Maker To Pay For Mass. Camp Fire

    A Philadelphia insurance company told a Massachusetts federal court Monday that a wood stain maker is responsible for $75,000 in damages from a spontaneous combustion at a summer camp, alleging the manufacturer's products caused the fire.

  • January 23, 2023

    Cozen O'Connor Lobby Firm Adds Ex-Habitat For Humanity VP

    Cozen O'Connor's lobbying and public affairs firm said Monday that it has hired the former vice president of government and community partnerships at Habitat for Humanity to advance clients' priorities in Albany and New York City.

  • January 20, 2023

    Court Won't Shield Housing Developers' Talks With Military

    A New York federal magistrate judge has refused to shield communications between military housing developers and the military in a suit alleging the companies were overcharged hundreds of millions of dollars on development loans, saying there was no privilege over those discussions.

  • January 20, 2023

    Ex-Condo Group Trustee Can Get Fees For Suing Peers

    A former trustee for an Atlantic City real estate nonprofit can recover legal fees from suing his fellow board members thanks to bylaws that don't disallow indemnification for such suits, a New Jersey appeals court ruled Friday.

  • January 20, 2023

    Michigan Appeals Panel Reverses Trespass Suit Fees

    A Michigan state appeals court has reversed and remanded a lower court's ruling awarding attorney fees in a property line dispute because the panel said the trial court did not enter an appropriate order on the record and didn't determine the fee.

  • January 20, 2023

    MB Financial Beats $400M FCA Suit Via Public Disclosure Rule

    A New York federal judge threw out a False Claims Act suit claiming MB Financial snagged $400 million in misbegotten reimbursements from federal regulators after taking on loans from a failed Chicago bank, ruling that the underlying allegations were already publicly disclosed.

Expert Analysis

  • How To Deal With Difficult Clients, Practically And Ethically

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    Meredith Stoma at Lewis Brisbois discusses common obstacles for counsel working with difficult clients and provides guidance on ethically managing or terminating these challenging relationships — as, for example, counsel for Ye have recently done.

  • A Game Changer For Mortgage Foreclosure Cases In NY

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    A New York appeals court's recent ruling in Federal National Mortgage Association v. Jeanty establishes that a borrower's partial payment on a mortgage in foreclosure resets the clock on the statute of limitations to foreclose, meaning loans previously considered time-barred may now be recoverable, say Adam Swanson and Jessie Bonaros at McCarter & English.

  • Federal Courts Should Adopt Supreme Court's Amicus Stance

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    The federal courts of appeals should adopt the U.S. Supreme Court's new approach to amicus curiae briefs, which allows the friend-of-the-court submissions to be filed without consent from the court or the parties, says Lawrence Ebner at Atlantic Legal Foundation.

  • Mortgage Lenders Must Prioritize Anti-Bias Compliance

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    The Biden administration has recently accelerated its anti-discrimination campaign against financial institutions that provide insufficient mortgage credit in minority communities, but legal exposure can be reduced via strong compliance programs that originate in the C-suite and permeate throughout the company, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • 3 Pricing Trends In Law Firm Use Of Litigation Funding

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    As BigLaw firms increasingly include litigation funding as a financing option for clients, internal pricing groups are taking the lead on standardizing and centralizing firm processes, and aggregating risk budgets, says Brendan Dyer at Woodsford Group.

  • Safeguarding Attorneys' Greatest Asset: Our Mental Health

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    Attorneys who understand that mental fitness is their most valuable characteristic should prioritize mental health care accordingly, including with certain activities they may not realize qualify as self-care, says Wendy Robbins at Holland & Knight.

  • NYC's New Law Is A Game Changer For Short-Term Rentals

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    On Jan. 9, strict new regulations controlling New York City's short-term rental industry will take effect, likely giving landlords the upper hand in addressing what has been one of the city's least-regulated industries, say Adam Lindenbaum and Collin Chipetine at Rosenberg & Estis.

  • Fla. Insurance Suit Trends To Look Out For After Hurricane Ian

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    There will likely be tens of thousands of property insurance lawsuits filed in the wake of Hurricane Ian, and carriers and insureds will need to view claims through Florida's Valued Policy Law, the concurrent cause doctrine and anti-concurrent cause provisions, say David Levin and Spencer Leach at Baker Donelson.

  • Law Schools Are Right To Steer Clear Of US News Rankings

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    By opting out of participating in the U.S. News & World Report annual rankings, law schools abandon a profoundly flawed system and free up their resources to adapt to the tsunami of changes overtaking the profession, says Nicholas Allard at Jacksonville University College of Law.

  • How CRE Buyers' Counsel Should Help Negotiate Sales

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    With commercial real estate deals becoming increasingly difficult for buyers in the current economy, it is crucial for buyers' counsel to understand how to push for specific representations and warranties in purchase and sale agreements without jeopardizing the deal, says Etan Moskovic at Cassin & Cassin.

  • Litigation Funders Seek Transparency In Disclosure Debate

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    Litigation funders want to correct the record on calls for funding disclosure in the name of transparency, as this purported justification obscures the disclosure's adverse effects — prejudicing plaintiffs' cases and discouraging the assertion of meritorious legal claims, say Dai Wai Chin Feman and William Weisman at Parabellum Capital.

  • 5 Principles For Better Professional Development Programs

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    The pandemic and ensuing "great resignation" have resulted in a more transient legal work force, but law firms can use effective professional development programs to bridge a cultural gap with new associates and stem associate attrition, says Matthew Woods at Robins Kaplan.

  • My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Practice With Passion

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    First Circuit Judge Gustavo Gelpí recalls how Suffolk University Law School's Joseph Glannon taught the importance of the law as both a tool and a profession, and that those who wish to practice law successfully must do so with love, enthusiasm and passion.