Residential

  • December 22, 2022

    Plaintiff Firms Spar Over RealPage Consolidation Bid In Wash.

    A plaintiff-side effort to consolidate 11 putative class actions against RealPage Inc. in the Western District of Washington is being met with resistance from a separate group of attorneys who say their own suits filed elsewhere in the U.S. make such a move premature.

  • December 22, 2022

    AIG Unit Argues Excess Policy Not Triggered By Irma Damage

    An AIG unit asked a Florida federal judge to toss a Miami condominium's suit seeking more than $2 million related to damage from Hurricane Irma, arguing that the condo didn't suffer enough damage to trigger coverage under its excess insurance policy.

  • December 22, 2022

    Fla. Timeshare Wants Early Win In Exit Biz Dispute

    Timeshare development company Bluegreen Vacation Unlimited Inc. asked a federal judge in Florida for an early win in its case alleging that Timeshare Freedom Group violated a law against unfair trade practices when it illegally referred timeshare owners as potential clients to law firms.

  • December 22, 2022

    Landlord Asks 4th Circ. To Revive Coverage Suit

    A North Carolina rental firm urged the Fourth Circuit to reverse a lower court's ruling that its insurer owes it no defense obligations in an underlying class action alleging it misused the state's eviction process, arguing that the insurer wrongfully denied coverage afforded for an abuse of process claim.

  • December 22, 2022

    Insurer Joins Lawsuits Over Utility Co.'s Pa. Gas Explosion

    Safeco Insurance claims Peoples Natural Gas failed to promptly shut off a pipeline and evacuate part of the Pennsylvania borough of Tyrone after a water contractor drilled through an active gas main in 2021, leading to an explosion and fire that killed one resident, according to a lawsuit filed in state court.

  • December 22, 2022

    Robinson & Cole Announces Five Promotions To Partner

    Robinson & Cole LLP is promoting five attorneys to partners in the Hartford, Connecticut; Providence, Rhode Island; and New York offices, the firm announced Thursday.

  • December 22, 2022

    IRS FY23 Funding Bill Passes Senate, Heads To House

    Senate lawmakers approved a $1.7 trillion federal spending package Thursday that would provide $12.3 billion for the IRS for fiscal 2023, as well as boost retirement tax savings and enforcement of potentially abusive conservation easement transactions.

  • December 22, 2022

    Mining Giant BHP To Face 2024 Trial Over Brazil Dam Collapse

    Global mining giant BHP Group is to face a £10 billion ($12 billion) damages claim in London in 2024 over a dam collapse that triggered Brazil's worst environmental disaster, the High Court has ruled.

  • December 21, 2022

    NY Says Climate No Excuse For Less Low-Income Lending

    While low- and moderate-income communities and communities of color are likely to be disproportionately harmed by climate change because of systemic racism and redlining, this does not free banks and mortgage lenders from providing fair access to capital, the New York Department of Financial Services said in guidance on Wednesday.

  • December 21, 2022

    Energy Co.'s Wind Farm Causing Nuisance, Texas Family Says

    A renewable energy company misled a north Texas family in promising numerous benefits of building a wind turbine farm in their neighborhood, when in reality the device allegedly caused health problems, loud noises and continuous flashing lights, according to a lawsuit.

  • December 21, 2022

    Texas Land Surveyor Claims Ex-VP Of Stole Trade Secrets

    A Texas land surveying company said one of its former vice presidents violated federal law and breached his contract when he allegedly stole confidential information before leaving to join a competitor, according to a lawsuit filed in Texas federal court.

  • December 21, 2022

    Pension Funds Seek Lead In Suit Over 'IBuying' Property Tech

    Pension funds for Indiana's state workers and Michigan's Oakland County employees urged an Arizona federal court to let them take the reins of a combined stockholder suit against Opendoor over the company's allegedly misleading statements about its "iBuying" algorithms.

  • December 21, 2022

    Wash. Panel Reverses Farmers' Win In Roof Damage Fight

    A Washington state appellate court overturned a condominium complex's trial court loss, finding coverage could exist under its Farmers Insurance Exchange policy for water damage to its building despite an exclusion for faulty design and construction.

  • December 21, 2022

    Native American Land Transfer Bills Sent To Biden's Desk

    The U.S. Senate has passed several bills that would advance certain priorities like promoting Native American languages, supporting health care and transferring some lands back to tribes, two senators announced.

  • December 21, 2022

    Clean Energy Financier Marked $2.5B For Solar Projects

    Clean energy financier Luminia processed more than $2.5 billion in financing requests this year for American solar-plus-storage projects that have an average of more than one megawatt, the company announced Wednesday.

  • December 21, 2022

    Libertarian Groups Back Short-Term Rentals At 5th Circ.

    Two libertarian organizations are urging the Fifth Circuit to revive a suit from Texas homeowners opposing a local prohibition on short-term rentals that was dismissed in a lower court, saying the homeowners did not get to present evidence for their claims that the ordinance was unconstitutional.

  • December 21, 2022

    Empire State Building Owner Buys Mid-Rise Tower For $114M

    Fried Frank guided Empire State Realty Trust, the owner of the Empire State Building, in the purchase of an apartment property in Manhattan for more than $114 million, according to broker JLL Capital Markets.

  • December 21, 2022

    Mortgage Lender Hit With $30M Employee Poaching Suit

    A mortgage lender has accused a rival in Tennessee federal court of executing a coordinated "corporate raid" that poached 100 employees on the same day in September, allegedly causing a loss of more than $30 million in revenue.

  • December 21, 2022

    Morris Manning Aids North Florida Land Buy For 6K Homes

    Master planned community developer BTI Partners LLC says it has acquired 3,300 acres of land south of Jacksonville, Florida, for $85 million, in a deal advised by Morris Manning & Martin LLP, and plans to build up to 6,000 housing units on the undeveloped property.

  • December 21, 2022

    How A BigLaw Probe Led To A Record NBA Franchise Sale

    A little over a year after an explosive November 2021 report spotlighting allegations of racism and misogyny by Robert Sarver led to a BigLaw investigation of the Phoenix Suns' owner, Sarver sold both the Suns and the WNBA's Phoenix Mercury this week. Here, Law360 breaks down the path that led to Sarver selling his teams for a record $4 billion.

  • December 21, 2022

    Trez Capital Restructures Florida Office, Launches In Miami

    Private real estate lender Trez Capital is closing its Palm Beach office as it prepares to open a new office for its Southeastern market in Miami, according to a Tuesday news release.

  • December 21, 2022

    Home Sales Dipped 7.7% In November, NAR Says

    The housing market continued to cool across the U.S. in November, with existing-home sales down 7.7%, according to a National Association of Realtors report released on Wednesday.

  • December 21, 2022

    Mass. Justices Give Golf Course Mulligan On Errant-Ball Trial

    Massachusetts' top court on Tuesday wiped out a $5 million verdict in favor of a couple whose house was repeatedly pelted with golf balls from an abutting country club course, ruling that the lower court judge improperly instructed the jury.

  • December 20, 2022

    Insurer Says Condo's Irma Suit Is In Wrong State, Too Late

    One of several insurers named in a $2.7 million lawsuit by a condominium association is asking a Florida federal court to dismiss it from the suit, telling the court its surplus policy requires litigation to be filed in New York and that damages must exceed $25 million to trigger coverage.

  • December 20, 2022

    Fla. Judge Skeptical Of Colombian's Diplomatic Immunity Bid

    A Florida federal judge seemed hesitant Tuesday to grant a Colombian businessman's request for diplomatic immunity to dismiss charges that he conspired to launder $350 million because he was serving as a special envoy for Venezuela when he was detained on a refueling stop en route to Iran.

Expert Analysis

  • Where Insurance Coverage For Condo Collapse Gets Murky

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    Property and casualty coverage for the Champlain Towers tragedy may be complicated, since different versions of collapse coverage are found in different policies, both for the individual condo owners and the condominium association, say Glenn Jacobson and Mark Binsky at Abrams Gorelick.

  • HUD's Disparate Impact Proposal Shows New Gov't Priorities

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    A recent U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development proposal to streamline the disparate impacts test for assessing Fair Housing Act discrimination is indicative of the government's increasing focus on consumer rights and equal treatment under the law, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Don't Expect 2008-Style Suits After Next Housing Crash

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    As pandemic-related supply and demand issues have led to a massive surge in housing prices, market corrections are sure to follow, and the legal fights that emerge will probably differ from the 2008 subprime mortgage crisis in key ways, says Eric Madsen at Berkeley Research Group.

  • Surfside Condo Collapse Highlights HOA Responsibilities

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    The recent collapse of a condo building in Surfside, Florida, and the ensuing litigation, are calling attention to the obligations of homeowners' associations across the country, making it a good time to brush up on best practices, says Jeanne Grove at Kaufman Dolowich.

  • Tips For Managing Price Escalation In Construction Projects

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    With material costs skyrocketing this year, contractors can better anticipate the risk of price escalation in construction by taking several steps during the bidding, contract negotiation and performance phases of a project, says Tamara McNulty at Potomac Law.

  • What Biden's Tax Proposals May Mean For Int'l Private Clients

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    Jennifer Wioncek and Paul D’Alessandro at Bilzin Sumberg discuss the U.S. Department of the Treasury's recently released explanation of the Biden administration's tax proposals and how the changes would affect income and wealth transfer planning for international private clients.

  • CFPB's New Foreclosure Limits Will Be Tough On Servicers

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    While the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's new Regulation X rules are touted as paving the way for a smooth transition as federal foreclosure moratoriums end this month, implementing the changes puts a heavy burden on loan servicers with only weeks to ensure compliance by the Aug. 31 deadline, say Allison Schoenthal and Matthew Sheldon at Goodwin.

  • A Confusing Split Over 'Reasonable Consumer' In Fla. Courts

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    Courts are divided over what counts as a reasonable consumer regarding determining liability under the Florida Deceptive and Unfair Trade Practices Act — including whether it is a judge or jury who makes that call — and with ample case law for either side of the issue, the only thing certain is that lawyers and clients will remain frustrated on the issue, say Aaron Weiss and James Czodli at Carlton Fields.

  • Justices' FHFA Ruling Is Small Step In A Dangerous Direction

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling this week in Collins — stripping the Federal Housing Finance Agency director of removal protections — fails to consider the dangerous possibility that a president with complete control over the executive branch could dictate policies undermining the rule of law, and democracy itself, says David Driesen at Syracuse University.

  • Challenges Facing California's Proposed Coastal Property Law

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    A proposed California law that would allow cities to buy coastal properties and rent them back to homeowners is a conceptually sound course of action to prepare for rising sea levels, but the planned voluntary acquisition program may encounter some obstacles, say Bradford Kuhn and Raven McGuane at Nossaman.

  • How COVID Could Worsen The US Construction Defect Crisis

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    The COVID-19 pandemic has created market conditions that may aggravate the decadeslong construction defect crisis in the American housing market due to supply chain disruptions, skilled labor shortages and time crunches, say attorneys at Ball Janik.

  • NY Courts Should Protect Housing Rights Of All Tenants

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    New York courts should adopt a construction of the Housing Stability and Tenant Protection Act that expands on the rights of tenants without a traditional landlord-tenant relationship, in order to not only promote justice, but also adhere to the law as written, say law student Giannina Crosby, and professors Sateesh Nori and Julia McNally, at NYU Law.

  • Collaborative Contracting Can Help Combat Bias In AI

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    To mitigate bias in artificial intelligence technology amid pending EU and U.S. regulations, contracting companies should consider each party's role in controlling for bias, rather than applying binary liability allocations, say Boris Segalis and Joshua Fattal at Goodwin and independent attorney Neal Dittersdorf.