Residential

  • December 22, 2022

    Insurer Joins Lawsuits Over Utility Co.'s Pa. Gas Explosion

    Safeco Insurance claims Peoples Natural Gas failed to promptly shut off a pipeline and evacuate part of the Pennsylvania borough of Tyrone after a water contractor drilled through an active gas main in 2021, leading to an explosion and fire that killed one resident, according to a lawsuit filed in state court.

  • December 22, 2022

    Robinson & Cole Announces Five Promotions To Partner

    Robinson & Cole LLP is promoting five attorneys to partners in the Hartford, Connecticut; Providence, Rhode Island; and New York offices, the firm announced Thursday.

  • December 22, 2022

    IRS FY23 Funding Bill Passes Senate, Heads To House

    Senate lawmakers approved a $1.7 trillion federal spending package Thursday that would provide $12.3 billion for the IRS for fiscal 2023, as well as boost retirement tax savings and enforcement of potentially abusive conservation easement transactions.

  • December 22, 2022

    Mining Giant BHP To Face 2024 Trial Over Brazil Dam Collapse

    Global mining giant BHP Group is to face a £10 billion ($12 billion) damages claim in London in 2024 over a dam collapse that triggered Brazil's worst environmental disaster, the High Court has ruled.

  • December 21, 2022

    NY Says Climate No Excuse For Less Low-Income Lending

    While low- and moderate-income communities and communities of color are likely to be disproportionately harmed by climate change because of systemic racism and redlining, this does not free banks and mortgage lenders from providing fair access to capital, the New York Department of Financial Services said in guidance on Wednesday.

  • December 21, 2022

    Energy Co.'s Wind Farm Causing Nuisance, Texas Family Says

    A renewable energy company misled a north Texas family in promising numerous benefits of building a wind turbine farm in their neighborhood, when in reality the device allegedly caused health problems, loud noises and continuous flashing lights, according to a lawsuit.

  • December 21, 2022

    Texas Land Surveyor Claims Ex-VP Of Stole Trade Secrets

    A Texas land surveying company said one of its former vice presidents violated federal law and breached his contract when he allegedly stole confidential information before leaving to join a competitor, according to a lawsuit filed in Texas federal court.

  • December 21, 2022

    Pension Funds Seek Lead In Suit Over 'IBuying' Property Tech

    Pension funds for Indiana's state workers and Michigan's Oakland County employees urged an Arizona federal court to let them take the reins of a combined stockholder suit against Opendoor over the company's allegedly misleading statements about its "iBuying" algorithms.

  • December 21, 2022

    Wash. Panel Reverses Farmers' Win In Roof Damage Fight

    A Washington state appellate court overturned a condominium complex's trial court loss, finding coverage could exist under its Farmers Insurance Exchange policy for water damage to its building despite an exclusion for faulty design and construction.

  • December 21, 2022

    Native American Land Transfer Bills Sent To Biden's Desk

    The U.S. Senate has passed several bills that would advance certain priorities like promoting Native American languages, supporting health care and transferring some lands back to tribes, two senators announced.

  • December 21, 2022

    Clean Energy Financier Marked $2.5B For Solar Projects

    Clean energy financier Luminia processed more than $2.5 billion in financing requests this year for American solar-plus-storage projects that have an average of more than one megawatt, the company announced Wednesday.

  • December 21, 2022

    Libertarian Groups Back Short-Term Rentals At 5th Circ.

    Two libertarian organizations are urging the Fifth Circuit to revive a suit from Texas homeowners opposing a local prohibition on short-term rentals that was dismissed in a lower court, saying the homeowners did not get to present evidence for their claims that the ordinance was unconstitutional.

  • December 21, 2022

    Empire State Building Owner Buys Mid-Rise Tower For $114M

    Fried Frank guided Empire State Realty Trust, the owner of the Empire State Building, in the purchase of an apartment property in Manhattan for more than $114 million, according to broker JLL Capital Markets.

  • December 21, 2022

    Mortgage Lender Hit With $30M Employee Poaching Suit

    A mortgage lender has accused a rival in Tennessee federal court of executing a coordinated "corporate raid" that poached 100 employees on the same day in September, allegedly causing a loss of more than $30 million in revenue.

  • December 21, 2022

    Morris Manning Aids North Florida Land Buy For 6K Homes

    Master planned community developer BTI Partners LLC says it has acquired 3,300 acres of land south of Jacksonville, Florida, for $85 million, in a deal advised by Morris Manning & Martin LLP, and plans to build up to 6,000 housing units on the undeveloped property.

  • December 21, 2022

    How A BigLaw Probe Led To A Record NBA Franchise Sale

    A little over a year after an explosive November 2021 report spotlighting allegations of racism and misogyny by Robert Sarver led to a BigLaw investigation of the Phoenix Suns' owner, Sarver sold both the Suns and the WNBA's Phoenix Mercury this week. Here, Law360 breaks down the path that led to Sarver selling his teams for a record $4 billion.

  • December 21, 2022

    Trez Capital Restructures Florida Office, Launches In Miami

    Private real estate lender Trez Capital is closing its Palm Beach office as it prepares to open a new office for its Southeastern market in Miami, according to a Tuesday news release.

  • December 21, 2022

    Home Sales Dipped 7.7% In November, NAR Says

    The housing market continued to cool across the U.S. in November, with existing-home sales down 7.7%, according to a National Association of Realtors report released on Wednesday.

  • December 21, 2022

    Mass. Justices Give Golf Course Mulligan On Errant-Ball Trial

    Massachusetts' top court on Tuesday wiped out a $5 million verdict in favor of a couple whose house was repeatedly pelted with golf balls from an abutting country club course, ruling that the lower court judge improperly instructed the jury.

  • December 20, 2022

    Insurer Says Condo's Irma Suit Is In Wrong State, Too Late

    One of several insurers named in a $2.7 million lawsuit by a condominium association is asking a Florida federal court to dismiss it from the suit, telling the court its surplus policy requires litigation to be filed in New York and that damages must exceed $25 million to trigger coverage.

  • December 20, 2022

    Fla. Judge Skeptical Of Colombian's Diplomatic Immunity Bid

    A Florida federal judge seemed hesitant Tuesday to grant a Colombian businessman's request for diplomatic immunity to dismiss charges that he conspired to launder $350 million because he was serving as a special envoy for Venezuela when he was detained on a refueling stop en route to Iran.

  • December 20, 2022

    Tenant Group Asks to Keep Third-Party Screening Suit Alive

    Two Massachusetts renters and an advocacy group asked a federal judge not to dismiss their lawsuit against SafeRent Solutions LLC, saying they can prove the company's scoring tool disproportionately denies housing to people of color by using credit scores.

  • December 20, 2022

    Dechert Advises Cerberus Capital On $871M Deal

    Dechert LLP has advised on an $871.6 million transaction from an affiliate of New York-based Cerberus Capital Management covering a series of properties.

  • December 20, 2022

    NY Real Estate Group Beats Antitrust Suit For Now

    A New York federal judge dismissed real estate broker Compass Inc.'s antitrust suit against trade association Real Estate Board of New York Inc. without prejudice, ruling that Compass' argument that the real estate market was becoming more competitive and other related lawsuits being resolved were "an adequate explanation for dismissal."

  • December 20, 2022

    No Prison For Investor Who Helped Cheat Quicken Loans

    Backed by letters from two ex-San Francisco mayors and 188 other supporters, convicted real estate investor Victor Makras avoided prison time Tuesday for aiding a then-city official to fraudulently obtain a $1.3 million home loan from Quicken Loans, receiving three years probation and a $15,000 fine.

Expert Analysis

  • Collaborative Contracting Can Help Combat Bias In AI

    Author Photo

    To mitigate bias in artificial intelligence technology amid pending EU and U.S. regulations, contracting companies should consider each party's role in controlling for bias, rather than applying binary liability allocations, say Boris Segalis and Joshua Fattal at Goodwin and independent attorney Neal Dittersdorf.

  • What EPA's Environmental Justice Push Means For Cos.

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's increased focus on environmental justice, which will give historically disadvantaged communities more influence over federal environmental policy, means that regulated companies should stay closely engaged with agency policymaking, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Biden Admin.'s Climate Strategy Should Include Insurance Innovations

    Author Photo

    To successfully meet the Biden administration's climate-related goals, the federal government must fill gaps in state regulation of environmental insurance, and help create an insurance framework that incentivizes and facilitates carbon impact reduction in four key areas, say Michael Hill and Paul Tetenbaum at Blue Dot Climate Insurance.

  • FDCPA Ruling Has Privacy Implications For Financial Services

    Author Photo

    In Hunstein v. Preferred Collection, the Eleventh Circuit’s recent decision to allow claims against a debt collector who shared customer information with a vendor is concerning for financial services companies in its potential to broaden the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and other consumer protection laws to include privacy rights, say attorneys at Holland & Knight.

  • Laws Favor NYC Tenants' Discovery In Rent Overcharge Suits

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Although a New York state court's decision in Regina Metro v. New York State Division of Housing and Community Renewal last year curtails certain tenant rights under the Housing Stability and Tenant Protection Act, subsequent cases have shown the law still favors broad discovery for tenants in rent overcharge cases, say Andrew Darcy and Brian Sullivan at Mobilization For Justice.

  • Key Considerations For Build-To-Rent Developers

    Author Photo

    As real estate developers and investors flock to the build-to-rent asset class, they should pay attention to some key issues, such as potential conflicts with local land development codes, says Jim McNeil at Akerman.

  • La. Tax Talk: Legislature Takes On Tax Reform

    Author Photo

    Louisiana taxpayers may see some needed tax improvements if the Legislature enacts major proposed reforms, like the long-overdue centralization of state and local sales and use tax collection, elimination of the antiquated corporation franchise tax, and reduction of income tax rates, say attorneys at Kean Miller.

  • Partial Repeal Could Resolve Biden's SALT Cap Dilemma

    Author Photo

    Lawmakers' calls to repeal the cap on federal deductions for state and local taxes are controversial because doing so could cost over $600 billion, but a partial repeal could be accomplished on a revenue-neutral basis, providing relief to some, if not most, affected taxpayers, says Joseph Mandarino at Smith Gambrell.

  • Why CFPB's Disposal Of Supervisory Tool Is Problematic

    Author Photo

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s recent elimination of supervisory recommendations that provide financial institutions feedback on compliance deficiencies is concerning and suggests the CFPB is clearing away obstacles to its discretion to invent, as well as enforce, the law, say Eric Mogilnicki and Jeremy Newell at Covington.

  • Florida Construction Defect Proposal Unfair To Homeowners

    Author Photo

    Proposed changes to Florida’s Chapter 558 notice process would require homeowners alleging construction defects to clear costly hurdles and sign perjury penalty acknowledgements, which would favor builders by discouraging suits seeking recovery, say Nick Vargo and Greg Demers at Ball Janik.

  • Cybersecurity Considerations After NY Lender's Data Breach

    Author Photo

    The New York Department of Financial Services’ recent enforcement action against Residential Mortgage Services for inadequately responding to a cybersecurity breach is instructive for financial institutions evaluating existing data security safeguards, refining their compliance programs and preparing for regulatory examinations, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • When Federal Courts Remand Eviction Actions Back To States

    Author Photo

    Bruce Falby and Paul Lewis at DLA Piper explore a recent trend of federal courts declining to adjudicate eviction cases removed from state court, even where there is diversity jurisdiction — and its implications for commercial tenants and landlords.

  • NY Rent Control Bill Would Hurt Residential Real Estate Sector

    Author Photo

    Legislation recently introduced in New York to effectively create rent control for virtually every residence would create problems for hotels, discourage the building of new housing projects and make it more difficult for landlords to evict occupants, says Stuart Saft at Holland & Knight.