Federal

  • January 11, 2023

    IRS Looks To Fend Off Challenge To Crypto Summons

    A New Hampshire federal court should dismiss a man's revived case challenging an IRS summons seeking information about his cryptocurrency transactions, the agency argued, saying it didn't trample on the man's constitutional privacy rights as he claimed.

  • January 11, 2023

    Developer's $2M Tax, Transfer Fraud Case Sent To Mediation

    A suit from the federal government accusing a real estate developer of owing $2 million in taxes and making fraudulent property transfers was referred to mediation by a Florida federal court.

  • January 11, 2023

    IRS Seeks Input On Employee Plan Filing Extension Form

    The Internal Revenue Service said Wednesday that it wanted comments on a form employers must use to put off the deadline for some plan returns.

  • January 11, 2023

    DC Atty Denies Role In Loss Of $19M From 'Captive' Insurance

    A veteran corporate tax lawyer in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday denied that he played a role in an alleged $19 million rip-off from a "captive" insurance strategy.

  • January 11, 2023

    Mass. Lobbyist Wants Redo In Kickback Case

    A Massachusetts lobbyist wants a new trial or outright acquittal after being convicted as part of a kickback scheme in November, saying there was no evidence to show the payments she made to the former head of the state police union were a quid pro quo.

  • January 11, 2023

    IRS Armed To Bolster Service In 2023, Taxpayer Advocate Says

    The Internal Revenue Service is in a better position to enhance its flagging taxpayer service in 2023 than it has been in recent years, National Taxpayer Advocate Erin Collins said in a report released Wednesday.

  • January 10, 2023

    Texas Oil Co. Calls Off $1.3B Tax Suit Similar To Exxon's

    A Texas oil company asked a federal court Tuesday to dismiss its $1.3 billion tax case, citing Exxon Mobil Corp.'s loss in a similar case in the Fifth Circuit last summer, which will stand because the Texas company says time has run out on an appeal.

  • January 10, 2023

    'Chrisley' Star Can't Kick Ex-Tax Investigator's Defamation Suit

    A Georgia federal judge won't dismiss a former state tax investigator's defamation case against a onetime star of reality TV show ''Chrisley Knows Best,'' saying serving the celebrity at a courthouse on a day he was attending his criminal sentencing was proper.

  • January 10, 2023

    IRS Extends Tax Deadlines For California Storm Victims

    The Internal Revenue Service announced extended deadlines Tuesday for people and businesses affected by the severe storms in California.

  • January 10, 2023

    Atty Gets Priority Over IRS To Legal Services Cash, Court Told

    A lawyer who represented a woman in her civil rights suit against the U.S. Department of Agriculture has priority to nearly $750,000 in legal services compensation over any potential tax claims the IRS might have to that money, the attorney told a Virginia federal court.

  • January 10, 2023

    Father-Son Contractors Get Prison Time For $6M Tax Fraud

    The father-son owners of two Florida construction companies who asked to avoid prison time after pleading guilty to illegally employing workers and failing to pay nearly $6 million in taxes were sentenced to nearly two and nearly three years in prison by a federal judge.

  • January 10, 2023

    Ex-Trump Org CFO Who Implicated Company Gets 5 Mos. Jail

    Longtime Trump Organization Chief Financial Officer Allen Weisselberg was sentenced Tuesday to five months in a New York City jail under the terms of a plea agreement that required him to implicate former President Donald Trump's companies in a tax fraud scheme.

  • January 10, 2023

    Chrisleys Denied Bond In $36M Bank Fraud Case

    Todd and Julie Chrisley of the reality television show "Chrisley Knows Best" must report to federal prison on Jan. 17 to start their sentences of 12 and seven years, respectively, over a $36 million bank fraud scheme and tax evasion, after a Georgia federal judge denied on Tuesday their request for bond pending appeal of their convictions.

  • January 09, 2023

    House GOP Votes To Rescind New IRS Enforcement Funding

    House Republicans voted to repeal some Inflation Reduction Act funding made available to the Internal Revenue Service for enforcement and other purposes late Monday in one of their first moves as the majority in the lower chamber.

  • January 09, 2023

    EV Tax Credit Rules Spell Confusion For Auto Industry

    Consumers scored major incentives under new electric-vehicle tax credits, but the boon for automakers that was forecast is less certain as the Biden administration has yet to clarify regulations governing where battery materials are sourced and where qualifying EVs are ultimately built, experts say.

  • January 09, 2023

    Roberts Warns Narrow Privilege Test Could Strain Courts

    Federal district courts could be strained if the U.S. Supreme Court adopts a narrow test for determining if dual-purpose client communications containing both legal and nonlegal advice are protected under attorney-client privilege, Chief Justice John Roberts said Monday.

  • January 09, 2023

    IRS Launches New YouTube Videos To Help Tribes With Taxes

    The IRS' office of Indian Tribal Governments said it has created three new YouTube videos that can help ITG customers search for online resources available from the IRS, avoid employment tax penalties and know who to phone for information.

  • January 09, 2023

    Republicans Pick Rep. Jason Smith To Lead House Tax Panel

    House Republicans on Monday named Missouri Rep. Jason Smith as the next chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, elevating a longtime representative to lead the powerful tax-writing panel in the 118th Congress.

  • January 09, 2023

    Couple Can't Claim Real Estate Theft Losses, US Says

    A South Carolina federal court should reject a couple's bid to recoup taxes based on their claims for theft loss deductions, the U.S. government argued, saying there wasn't a theft of their real estate investments as they have alleged.

  • January 09, 2023

    Tax Court Blocks Texas Software Co.'s Biz Deductions

    A Texas couple who owned an open-source software development company cannot claim certain business deductions for it because the expenses should have been claimed personally as employee expenses, the U.S. Tax Court decided Monday.

  • January 09, 2023

    Biz Accused Of Tax Schemes Can't Block IRS Summonses

    A Utah federal judge denied on Monday eight petitions to quash IRS summonses aimed at investigating a company accused of engaging in abusive tax schemes, rejecting the company's claim that the agency had scared off its customers in violation of its First Amendment rights.

  • January 09, 2023

    State Dept. Plans To Lower Citizenship Renunciation Fee

    The U.S. State Department is planning to reduce the citizenship renunciation fee from its current $2,350 to $450, according to a filing by the government in a D.C. federal court, where the fee has been challenged by U.S. citizens living abroad.

  • January 09, 2023

    Tax Court Denies Couple University Expenses Credit

    A California couple owe a $2,500 tax deficiency for 2018 because they aren't entitled to a tax credit for tuition or related expenses based on the court record, the U.S. Tax Court said Monday.

  • January 09, 2023

    Tax Court Allows Couple To Deduct Ranch Losses

    A California couple who bought a ranch that proved unprofitable can take deductions for related losses because they undertook the ownership of the ranch for profit, not withstanding its losses, the U.S. Tax Court said Monday.

  • January 09, 2023

    Va. Atty Gets 4 Years For Defrauding The IRS

    A Virginia attorney and former member of the state bar's disciplinary committee has been sentenced to more than four years in prison and fined $200,000 after pleading guilty to felony tax fraud.

Expert Analysis

  • Why I'll Miss Arguing Before Justice Breyer

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    Carter Phillips at Sidley shares some of his fondest memories of retiring Justice Stephen Breyer both inside and out of the courtroom, and explains why he thinks the justice’s multipronged questions during U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments were everything an advocate could ask for.

  • Corporate Reporting Considerations As Tax Meets ESG

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    With the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing season upon us amid increasing pressure for greater transparency around effective tax rates and tax strategies, multinational companies must decide how they will approach voluntary tax reporting and prepare their responses if they want to control the narrative, say Michael Lebovitz and Jenny Austin at Mayer Brown.

  • How To Navigate Equity Rollovers In A Tight M&A Market

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    As heavy competition for acquisition targets allows buyers to be more flexible in fulfilling their desire for management to roll equity and invest with them, businesses should be mindful that equity rollover transactions, which take many forms, also require thorough review as part of the overall transaction assessment, says Joshua Klein at Neal Gerber.

  • 11th Circ. Ruling Moves Circuits Closer To Tax Procedure Split

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent decision in the conservation easement case Hewitt v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, holding a long-standing tax regulation procedurally flawed under the Administrative Procedure Act, is unusual and may presage a circuit split over the APA's applicability in tax cases, say Maria Jones and Samuel Lapin at Miller & Chevalier.

  • How Justices May Interpret Statutory Time Bar In Tax Context

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    In Boechler PC v. Commissioner, the U.S. Supreme Court will rule on whether a tax court filing deadline acts as a jurisdictional limitation, and whether to broaden a jurisprudential trend that requires Congress to clearly state its intent if statutory time periods are to limit jurisdiction, say Saul Mezei and Terrell Ussing at Gibson Dunn.

  • Money Laundering Regs Too Unwieldy To Police Art Market

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    As the arts and antiquities trade awaits the U.S. Department of the Treasury's new money laundering regulations — which apply the Bank Secrecy Act to the arts for the first time — whether they are reasonable, optimal or practical remains in question, says Alexandra Darraby at The Art Law Firm.

  • Why US Businesses May Stop Accepting Cryptocurrency

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    New reporting requirements from the IRS and Financial Crimes Enforcement Network could be game changers that dramatically curtail U.S. businesses that accept cryptocurrency, says cybersecurity consultant John Reed Stark.

  • The Highs And Lows Of Tax Controversy In 2021

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    Lawrence Hill at Steptoe & Johnson reviews the ups and downs of tax controversy practice in 2021, including the continued effects of the pandemic, troubling decisions on attorney-client privilege and an IRS comeback on transfer pricing.

  • A Look At Tax Treatment Of Noncompetes In M&A: Part 2

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Covenants that restrict a seller of business assets from competing against the purchasing party can be prone to challenges because the allocation of value to intangible assets is a subjective exercise with significant tax implications that may affect the merits of the deal, says Peter Miller at LexisNexis.

  • A Look At Tax Treatment Of Noncompetes In M&A: Part 1

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    In negotiating to consummate a deal, parties must pay attention to the tax consequences of covenants that restrict a seller of business assets from competing against the purchasing party, says Peter Miller at LexisNexis.

  • How Budget Bill Could Affect Employer Health, Benefit Plans

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    Following the House's recent passage of President Joe Biden’s $1.75 trillion spending bill — the Build Back Better Act — employers should carefully consider several of the proposal’s health care and benefits provisions, which could pose immediate compliance challenges if the act is signed into law this year, say Anne Hall and Tim Kennedy at Hall Benefits Law.

  • 3 Forces That Will Define Sales Tax Compliance In 2022

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    As we head into 2022, it's likely that many of the legal and cultural shifts we saw this year — such as increased adoption of economic nexus and marketplace facilitator laws, growth in state budgets and continuation of remote work — will define sales tax compliance in the new year, says Liz Armbruester at Avalara.

  • When And How To Depose Fact Witnesses Remotely In 2022

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    Tim Tryniecki and Thomas Mudd at MG+M offer a series of practice tips for successfully conducting remote depositions of often-inexperienced fact witnesses, as the virtual court proceedings sparked by COVID-19 look set to become a part of the legal landscape next year.

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