More Real Estate Coverage

  • December 01, 2022

    US Construction Spending Fell In October, Report Shows

    Overall construction spending across the country declined 0.3% in October, although nonresidential public spending in areas such as education saw increases, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Thursday.

  • December 01, 2022

    Pair Admit Bribing Pacific Atoll Politicians In Shady Biz Plot

    A Chinese entrepreneur and his assistant copped Thursday in Manhattan federal court to bribing political officials in the Republic of the Marshall Islands after prosecutors said they planned to turn a faraway Marshallese atoll into a semi-autonomous business zone.

  • November 30, 2022

    9th Circ. Rehearing To Explore 1980 Alaska Conservation Law

    The Ninth Circuit has indicated that the full bench plans to delve into the Carter-era Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act as it mulls the legality of a proposed land swap between the federal government and a Native Alaskan village.

  • November 30, 2022

    Local Gov'ts Dig Deep To Tackle Regs For Bitcoin Mining

    Bitcoin mines tend to drive up energy costs and generate loud noises that can irritate neighbors, but governments increasingly are regulating them to the point that some think the industry could move the needle on renewable energy.

  • November 30, 2022

    Wash. City Offers To Pay $300K To End Tribe's Cleanup Suit

    The city of Yakima, Washington, on Wednesday offered to pay nearly $300,000 to reimburse the Yakama Nation for its work cleaning up a former city landfill in an effort to end a lawsuit over the project.

  • November 30, 2022

    FERC OKs Grid Operator's Plan To Speed Up Project Hookups

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has approved an overhaul of the largest regional grid operator's policies for connecting new power projects, though one commissioner questioned whether reforms will be enough to unclog a backlog of thousands of renewable energy projects trying to get onto the grid.

  • November 30, 2022

    Justices Ponder 'Drive-By' Take On Jurisdiction In Title Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday examined whether its prior pronouncements regarding the Quiet Title Act's statute of limitations bar federal courts from hearing a dispute over a remote Montana road.

  • November 30, 2022

    Dutch Court Nixes Damages Claims Over Coal Ban

    The Dutch government does not need to compensate German energy suppliers RWE and Uniper after enacting a plan to phase out coal power generation, a Dutch court ruled on Wednesday, saying the companies should have predicted that the ban would be passed if they did not reduce their emissions.

  • November 30, 2022

    Texas Appeals Court OKs Brownsville Natural Gas Facilities

    Construction for liquid natural gas facilities in Brownsville, Texas, can move forward as planned after the Thirteenth Court of Appeals upheld a lower court's ruling that the leases on the land were valid.

  • November 30, 2022

    US Giving Tribes $75M For Climate-Related Relocation

    The Biden administration will give a combined $75 million to help three Indigenous tribes start relocating to higher ground, as the coastal communities confront a host of worsening climate-related threats to their critical infrastructure, including rising seas, flooding and erosion.

  • November 30, 2022

    Austria Loses Challenge To Russia-Funded Nuclear Plants

    Austria lost its challenge on Wednesday against a European Commission decision to allow Hungary to expand its Paks nuclear power plant with Russian aid, as the bloc's second highest court found that the state funding did not violate internal market laws.

  • November 29, 2022

    BIA Looks To Toss Oil Co.'s Drilling Rights Suit In ND

    The U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs has asked a North Dakota federal judge to throw out an oil and gas developer's lawsuit over the transfer of drilling rights to a pair of competitors, saying their rival has not exhausted the administrative remedies available in its challenge.

  • November 29, 2022

    Feds Defend Use Of Foreign Parts In $430M Dredging Contract

    The U.S. Coast Guard defended a $430 million dredging contract against allegations that the contracting company was illegally allowed to use foreign-sourced equipment parts, telling a Texas federal court on Monday that it properly followed applicable statutes and regulations in awarding the job.

  • November 29, 2022

    Maine Supreme Court Restores Lease For $1B Power Line

    The Maine Supreme Judicial Court on Tuesday validated a state lease for an embattled $1 billion power line, ruling the state's bureau of parks and lands correctly found that the project would not substantially alter the small tract of public land.

  • November 29, 2022

    Dam Removal Unlikely To Alter Irrigation Suit, Tribe Atty Says

    The destruction of four hydroelectric dams along the Klamath River in California, approved this month by federal regulators, is unlikely to affect litigation over a massive irrigation system upstream, according to a lawyer for the Hoopa Valley Tribe, who hailed the dam removal plans but warned that demolition is just a start in the fight for water rights.

  • November 29, 2022

    NASA Picks 3D Printing Co. For Lunar Construction Contract

    NASA on Tuesday announced it has selected Austin, Texas-based 3D printing company ICON for a $57.2 million contract to develop technologies to build landing pads, roads and other infrastructure on the surface of the moon.

  • November 29, 2022

    Treasury Clarifies Labor Rules For Green Energy Tax Credits

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury unveiled initial guidance Tuesday on the labor requirements that must be met to unlock bonus tax benefits for clean energy projects under the Democrats' landmark climate law.

  • November 29, 2022

    Energy Cos. Fight Remand Of DC Climate Suit Pending Appeal

    Chevron and three other energy behemoths urged a D.C. federal judge to put on hold his decision remanding the District of Columbia's lawsuit seeking climate change-related infrastructure damages from them while they plead their case to the D.C. Circuit.

  • November 28, 2022

    High Court Seems Inclined To Again Curtail Corruption Cases

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday seemed poised to again limit the government's ability to pursue certain public corruption cases and strike down a theory used to prosecute wire fraud, in two separate but related cases arising from the convictions of a top aide to former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and a construction executive.

  • November 28, 2022

    High Court To Weigh Tradition And Change In Easement Suit

    When it hears a dispute this week over the exact nature of the Quiet Title Act's statute of limitations in a case involving a remote road in Montana, the U.S. Supreme Court will be asked to clarify its broader and seemingly evolving thinking on statutory time bars.

  • November 28, 2022

    Green Groups Say New Law Does Not Moot Oil Lease Fight

    Environmental advocacy groups have asked the D.C. Circuit to reject the federal government's assertion that pending litigation over a massive offshore drilling lease sale in the Gulf of Mexico is rendered moot by the Inflation Reduction Act.

  • November 28, 2022

    Biden Gets More Time To Respond To Monuments Suit

    A federal magistrate judge on Monday allowed the federal government extra time to respond to a lawsuit challenging the Biden administration's restoration of national monuments in southern Utah, rejecting the plaintiffs' plea to "keep this case on track."

  • November 23, 2022

    Gov't Slams Hamptonites' Suit Over Offshore Wind Project

    The federal government urged a New York federal court on Wednesday to dismiss a suit filed by four Hamptons residents challenging the onshore construction for an offshore wind energy facility, arguing that the residents are wrongfully targeting the federal government after their state court attempts to block the project failed.

  • November 23, 2022

    Colo. Mine Contractor Beats Pollution Claim Over 2015 Spill

    One of the federal contractors working on a Colorado gold mine before its catastrophic rupture in 2015 cannot be held financially liable over that incident, a federal judge has ruled, finding no evidence that the company had control of highly toxic water that later spilled into nearby rivers.

  • November 23, 2022

    NC Sues 3M, DuPont Over 'Forever Chemical' Contamination

    North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein has accused 3M, DuPont and 13 other chemical companies of contaminating the state's water and soil through their manufacture of products containing toxic "forever chemicals."

Expert Analysis

  • Law Schools Are Right To Steer Clear Of US News Rankings

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    By opting out of participating in the U.S. News & World Report annual rankings, law schools abandon a profoundly flawed system and free up their resources to adapt to the tsunami of changes overtaking the profession, says Nicholas Allard at Jacksonville University College of Law.

  • Litigation Funders Seek Transparency In Disclosure Debate

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    Litigation funders want to correct the record on calls for funding disclosure in the name of transparency, as this purported justification obscures the disclosure's adverse effects — prejudicing plaintiffs' cases and discouraging the assertion of meritorious legal claims, say Dai Wai Chin Feman and William Weisman at Parabellum Capital.

  • 5 Principles For Better Professional Development Programs

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    The pandemic and ensuing "great resignation" have resulted in a more transient legal work force, but law firms can use effective professional development programs to bridge a cultural gap with new associates and stem associate attrition, says Matthew Woods at Robins Kaplan.

  • My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Practice With Passion

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    First Circuit Judge Gustavo Gelpí recalls how Suffolk University Law School's Joseph Glannon taught the importance of the law as both a tool and a profession, and that those who wish to practice law successfully must do so with love, enthusiasm and passion.

  • ESA Listing Change Shows Conservation Partnership Benefits

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    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's recent decision to narrow the range of the gopher tortoise’s Endangered Species Act status demonstrates that public-private voluntary conservation partnerships can help leverage landowners' knowledge of their working lands to the benefit of species, the ecosystem and the landowners, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • State-Led Programs Can Speed Up Brownfield Development

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    Too often, publicly funded brownfields programs are not optimized to achieve redevelopment in the near term, but policymakers can address this problem by directing additional resources toward state-level brownfields programs that offer thoughtfully designed tax incentives and liability protection, says Gerald Pouncey at Morris Manning.

  • Questions To Ask Before Making A Lateral Move As Partner

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    Law firm partners considering lateral moves should diligently interview prospects — going beyond standard questions about compensation to inquire about culture, associate retention and other areas that can provide a more comprehensive view, says Lauren Wu at VOYLegal.

  • My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Argue Open-Mindedly

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    Queens College President Frank Wu reflects on how Yale Kamisar’s teaching and guidance at the University of Michigan Law School emphasized a capacity to engage with alternative worldviews and the importance of the ability to argue for both sides of a debate.

  • Outlook For Offshore Wind Development In The Gulf Of Mexico

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    Jana Grauberger and Stephen Wiegand at Liskow & Lewis discuss the current status of wind development in the Gulf of Mexico and the qualification requirements for holding offshore wind leases, and look ahead to potential effects that the Inflation Reduction Act may have on the offshore wind leasing timeline.

  • ABA's No-Contact Rule Advice Raises Questions For Lawyers

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    The American Bar Association's ethics committee recently issued two opinions concerning the no-contact rule — one creates an intuitive and practical default for electronic communications, while the other sets a potential trap for pro se lawyers, say Lauren Snyder and Deepika Ravi at HWG.

  • 4 Key Skills For An Effective Attorney Coaching Conversation

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    As BigLaw firms are increasingly offering internal coaching as one of many talent strategies to stem ongoing lawyer attrition, Stacey Schwartz at Katten discusses how coaches can help attorneys achieve their goals.

  • How Civilian Attorneys Can Help Veterans

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    With legal aid topping the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' annual list of unmet needs of veterans facing housing insecurity, nonmilitary volunteer attorneys can provide some of the most effective legal services to military and veteran clients, say Anna Richardson at Veterans Legal Services and Nicholas Hasenfus at Holland & Knight.

  • Cases Show Real-World Laws Likely Apply In Metaverse

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    Although much has been written about the so-called unprecedented legal issues raised by the metaverse, recent federal cases demonstrate that companies can expect metaverse activities to be policed and enforced much like they would be in the physical world, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.