Lead Story Picture

GM Ducks Demand For 'Park It Now' Notice On Recalled Cars

A Texas federal judge on Thursday refused to force General Motors Co. to warn consumers against driving the 2.6 million vehicles recalled for faulty ignition switches, finding that to do so would unwisely usurp the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration’s authority.

Legal Industry

Industry News

Regional News

Practice News

Expert Analysis

  • BLM Venting And Flaring Rule May Spur EPA Regs On Methane

    Luke D. Johnson

    While the Bureau of Land Management's venting and flaring rule may be focused on the government's possible loss of resources from the energy industry's use of public land, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency can be expected to focus more directly on methane itself. Potential regulations emerging from recently-released EPA white papers should be on the industry's radar, whether suppliers are operating on federal land or not, says Luke Johnson of Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck LLP.

  • Mobile Enforcement Continues To Be APPealing To FTC

    Alysa Z. Hutnik

    Since the Federal Trade Commission announced its first enforcement action involving a mobile app back in 2011, the commission has actively brought privacy cases against app developers under Section 5 of the FTC Act. Oftentimes, the FTC's actions came from a disconnect between the privacy policies and actions a mobile app or device took, which may have resulted from an update without alerting consumers, say Alysa Hutnik and Crystal Skelton of Kelley Drye & Warren LLP.

  • Employers: Take Care In Crafting Confidentiality Clauses

    Christopher V. Bacon

    Employers are often surprised to learn that policies explicitly prohibiting employees from discussing salaries are in violation of Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act, as was recently affirmed in Flex Frac Logistics LLC v. NLRB. However, employers are still entitled to take precautions in order to protect their confidential proprietary information and trade secrets from disclosure by their employees, say Christopher Bacon and Ashlee Grant of Vinson & Elkins LLP.

  • No More Export Licenses For Russia: Tips For Exporters

    Alexandra Lopez-Casero

    Most media coverage about the Ukraine-related sanctions against Russia has focused on the decision to blacklist prominent Russian officials, but the more pressing issue for many U.S. exporters is the significant move by the U.S. government to stop issuing export licenses for dual-use and defense items to Russia, says Alexandra Lopez-Casero of Nixon Peabody LLP.

  • Activist Investors — Brace Yourselves For 13D Changes

    Perrie Michael Weiner

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is turning more aggressive attention toward shareholder activists, and the issue of revising the Schedule 13D timetable is alive once again, largely due both to a recent media report and its confluence with another event — the news that such a measure has the support of perhaps the preeminent juridical voice in American corporate law, Delaware Supreme Court Chief Justice Leo E. Strine Jr., say Perrie Michael Weiner and Patrick Hunnius of DLA Piper.

  • The Future Of Law Firm PR: The Good, Bad And Ugly

    Paul Webb

    There has been a dramatic change in how public relations professionals interact with the news media to promote or protect a law firm’s brand and reputation. But content is queen and has a bright future in law firm PR — it all begins with a plan that should include goals, performance indicators and a system of assessment, say Paul Webb, director of marketing at Young Conaway Stargatt & Taylor LLP, and Kathy O'Brien, senior vice president at Jaffe PR.

  • Low Examiner Allowance Rates, High Patent Term Adjustments

    Kate Gaudry

    Our study of patent term adjustment data for 19,470 patents granted since Jan. 1, 2008, shows that allowance-rate variability translates into another marked variability with regard to PTA. Given that PTA is awarded in response to prolonged examination, it reflects the antithesis of compact prosecution, say Kate Gaudry and Daniel Cummings of Kilpatrick Townsend and Stockton LLP.

  • Light On The Horizon For 'Bad Boy' Guarantors

    Janice Mac Avoy

    In keeping with commercial real estate guarantors’ expectations of what it means to sign a “bad boy” guaranty, the Southern District of New York’s ruling in CP III Rincon Towers v. Cohen has turned the tide against recent decisions that purport to apply “plain language” in a way that causes commercially unreasonable and absurd results, say Janice Mac Avoy and Gregg Weiner of Fried Frank Harris Shriver & Jacobson LLP.

  • A Communication Gap Between Industry, Debarring Officials

    David Robbins

    There is a fundamental gap in communications between contractors and debarring officials, often making their interactions inefficient, unproductive and costly. To help bridge the gap, there are three crucial points the government should know about contractors facing suspension or proposed debarment, and three crucial points contractors should know about suspending and debarring officials, says David Robbins of Shulman Rogers Gandal Pordy & Ecker PA.

  • Connected Cars Collide With Consumer Privacy

    Nancy Libin

    Some predict "connected cars" will generate revenue of more than $25 billion in 2014 and more than $130 billion in 2019. But before automakers, mobile app developers and others in the connected car ecosystem can cash in, legislators and regulators have difficult data privacy issues to address, says Nancy Libin, a partner at Wilkinson Barker Knauer LLP and former chief privacy and civil liberties officer of the U.S. Department of Justice.