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Apple Must Face State AGs' E-Book Damages Trial

Apple Inc. can't dodge a bid by more than 30 state attorneys general to obtain enhanced damages on behalf of consumers for the technology giant’s alleged conspiracy with publishers to fix e-book prices, a New York federal judge ruled Tuesday, finding that the authorities have standing to pursue damages.

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  • Beware 'Jewel' Risks In Lateral Partner Hiring

    Pamela Phillips

    Jewel litigation has been filed after every major law firm bankruptcy in the past 10 years, including Lyon & Lyon, Brobeck, Coudert, Thelen, Heller and Howrey. These lawsuits have produced years of litigation, with similar suits expected in the Dewey bankruptcy. Despite the legal uncertainties surrounding such claims, hiring firms can take steps now to minimize their Jewel risk for any lateral hire, say attorneys with Arnold & Porter LLP.

  • A Quick Guide To East Texas' Fast Track For Patent Cases

    Lionel Lavenue

    Some of the early commentary on the Eastern District of Texas' new alternative case management procedure for patent cases focused on how it might be “bad news” for some nonpracticing entities taking that approach. A deeper dive, however, reveals that, while Track B might benefit parties accused of infringing a patent in some situations, in others, it might even benefit parties asserting their patents, say attorneys with Finnegan Henderson Farabow Garrett & Dunner LLP.

  • Sweet Or Sour Development? EPA Tightens Tier 3 Gas Program

    Brenna K. Finn

    Gasoline sulfur levels have dropped up to 90 percent from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Tier 2 Gasoline Sulfur Program, and the EPA's recently issued notice for the Tier 3 Program will further reduce gasoline sulfur content. However, it does not take much for a refinery to exceed the 10 ppm sulfur standard, and a stronger incentive may exist for refiners to generate and bank credits for their own future use, say Laura Riese and Brenna Finn of Davis Graham & Stubbs LLP.

  • Are You Covered For Food Product Recalls?

    Joshua D. Davey

    While relatively few food recall claims have been litigated, there is a small body of case law that has developed in the last few years highlighting important considerations for policyholders. The cases generally hold that there is no coverage for a purely prophylactic recall, a result that has the potential to exclude a significant number of recalls from coverage — policyholders must demonstrate actual contamination or mislabeling, says Joshua Davey of McGuireWoods LLP.

  • Medicare Data Release May Spur Health Care Investigations

    Eric D. Fader

    Some industry observers have speculated that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' recent release of data on Medicare reimbursement payments to health care providers will result in an increase in whistleblower claims under the False Claims Act. While that remains to be seen, "outlier" providers identified in the data may be wise to prepare for some unwanted attention, say Eric Fader and Elizabeth Kim of Day Pitney LLP.

  • Ill. High Court Holds The Line On Employee Classification

    Michael G. Congiu

    The Illinois Supreme Court recently rejected a constitutional challenge to the Illinois Employee Classification Act from a roofing contractor on the grounds that the law violates procedural due process rights and is impermissibly vague. The court's move confirms the ECA's continued vitality, but it does not resolve other issues sure to arise in future litigation, including whether an employee is "performing services" under the law, say Michael Congiu and Amy Rettberg of Littler Mendelson PC.

  • Calif.'s Small Step Toward 'Redevelopment 2.0'?

    Laurie N. Gustafson

    More than two years after Gov. Jerry Brown and the California Legislature dissolved the state's 400-plus redevelopment agencies, the governor has begun addressing their replacement by proposing to revise and expand the use of infrastructure financing districts. The proposal, however, appears to be only a small step toward “Redevelopment 2.0,” with many expressing concerns that the new tax-increment financing tools may not be as effective as redevelopment, says Laurie Gustafson of Sedgwick LLP.

  • Reading Between The Whistleblower Headlines

    Shanti Atkins

    The meteoric media rise of the “celebrity” whistleblower has shone a spotlight on the practice, with personalities such as Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden dividing public opinion on the ethics of spilling secrets. But organizations should pay close attention to the surge in this trend beyond the headlines. Remember, whistleblowers don’t need to be popular to be effective, and opinions on their motives and morality are entirely secondary to the critical issues they potentially uncover, says Shanti Atkins of Navex Global.

  • 7th Circ. Ruling May Restrict Int'l Cartel Enforcement

    Alex Bourelly

    What’s next for international cartel cases based on arguments for potential applications of the Foreign Trade Antitrust Improvements Act? Judge Richard Posner and the Seventh Circuit recently gave one answer to that question, and it’s good news for many criminal defendants and potential targets of investigations, say Alex Bourelly and Noah Mink of Baker Botts LLP.

  • Home Entertainment Market Offers Opportunity And Peril

    F. Paul Pittman

    The emergence of “smart” technology is opening new avenues for advertisers and media and entertainment companies to reach consumers at home and provide them with content and services in a new interactive, direct and personalized manner. But companies must be aware of the potential dangers in this space and take certain steps to ensure transparency in their data collection efforts, says F. Paul Pittman of Sedgwick LLP.