International Trade

  • February 18, 2011

    Senate Bill Would Arm DOJ To Fight OPEC

    Sen. Herb Kohl, D-Wis., and his colleagues are aiming to authorize the U.S. Department of Justice to pursue antitrust action against countries that collude to set oil prices or limit production — including members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries.

  • February 17, 2011

    SEC Corruption Probe Prompts Scrutiny Of Deals

    In the wake of a U.S. inquiry into foreign bribery in the financial services industry, banks and private equity funds are putting the brakes on business deals in some of the globe's hottest markets as they make sure their transactions weren't brokered by corrupt sales agents overseas.

  • February 17, 2011

    Australia, New Zealand Ease Investment Regs

    Australia and New Zealand have inked a bilateral investment agreement to strengthen economic and trade tries between the neighboring countries by freeing investment from regulatory review.

  • February 17, 2011

    Feds Arrest Woman In Illegal Honey Import Scheme

    A Chinese woman who served as a business agent for several California honey importers has been arrested in connection with an $80 million honey smuggling ring that illegally imported the sweet stuff from China without paying anti-dumping duties.

  • February 17, 2011

    US Questions Brazilian Subsidies At WTO

    The U.S. has reportedly asked the World Trade Organization to help determine whether the low-interest financing Brazil’s state-run development bank gives to local industries amounts to an illegal subsidy for those industries’ exports.

  • February 17, 2011

    Panasonic Settles Sprawling IP Fight With Freescale

    Panasonic Corp. and Freescale Semiconductor Inc. have reached a global settlement of a patent infringement dispute that spanned across two U.S. district courts, a Japanese court and the U.S. International Trade Commission.

  • February 17, 2011

    DOC Finds Chinese Boron-Added Steel Subject To Duties

    The U.S. Department of Commerce has preliminarily found that Chinese cut-to-length carbon steel plate producers are circumventing anti-dumping duties by adding boron to their products.

  • February 17, 2011

    Investor Targets Tidewater Board Over FCPA Cases

    A Tidewater Inc. shareholder has launched a derivative suit against the offshore services provider’s top brass over alleged Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations that cost the company $15 million in enforcement settlements.

  • February 17, 2011

    Lawmakers Plan To Tighten Sanctions On Iran

    Newly introduced bipartisan legislation would require companies to report to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission any investments in Iran's energy sector subject to U.S. sanctions and require American banks to report sanctionable activities by foreign affiliates.

  • February 17, 2011

    EU Lawmakers Pass Landmark S. Korea FTA

    European lawmakers signed off on the European Union's free trade agreement with South Korea Thursday, paving the way for the two governments to eliminate almost all of their import duties on each other's industrial and agricultural products within five years.

  • February 16, 2011

    Philip Morris Sues Chinese Sites Over Fake Marlboros

    Philip Morris USA Inc., a unit of Altria Group Inc., has sued seven Chinese websites and eight California retailers for allegedly peddling knockoffs of the tobacco company's top-selling cigarette brands.

  • February 16, 2011

    ITC Keeps Chinese Cookware Duties After Quick Review

    The U.S. International Trade Commission has decided to hold onto an anti-dumping duty order on porcelain-on-steel cookware imports from China, determining after an expedited review process that revoking the duty would likely injure U.S. producers.

  • February 16, 2011

    ITC's Public Interest Rule Draws Atty Fire

    The U.S. International Trade Commission is mulling a rule to require evidence up front that exclusion orders in Section 337 patent infringement cases could have a negative impact on the public interest, but the move could make it harder for complainants to secure an injunction and reduce the appeal of litigating in the popular forum, attorneys say.

  • February 16, 2011

    CIT Tells Commerce To Review S. Korean Steel Duties

    The U.S. Court of International Trade has ordered the U.S. Department of Commerce to reconsider calculations in an anti-dumping order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from South Korea in light of challenges from domestic companies.

  • February 16, 2011

    Japan, Papua New Guinea Reach Investment Deal

    Japan and Papua New Guinea have reached an initial deal for a joint investment treaty designed to boost Japanese investments in the country and help develop its economy.

  • February 16, 2011

    KBR Subsidiary To Pay $11M Over UK Bribery Charges

    A U.K. subsidiary of KBR Inc. has reached an $11.2 million settlement in a suit brought by British regulators over profits received from a bribery scheme for natural gas contracts in Nigeria from 1994 to 2004.

  • February 16, 2011

    EU Targets 6 More Countries Over Russian Air Deals

    The European Union's antitrust enforcer began investigating six more member nations on Wednesday based on concerns that their bilateral air service agreements with Russia may unfairly force some EU airlines to pay extra charges for flying over Siberia to Asia.

  • February 16, 2011

    Senate Eyes Online Piracy Bill In 2011

    Senators from both sides of the aisle vowed Wednesday to pass legislation targeting online piracy in 2011 while debating how to handle international infringers, online search advertising and the possibility of allowing private lawsuits to enforce the law.

  • February 15, 2011

    Judge Grants Bid To Shield FCPA Case Info

    A federal judge has granted a broadened protective order for defendants in the so-called Shot-Show case stemming from an undercover bribery sting, laying out the boundaries for the dissemination of information in the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act case.

  • February 15, 2011

    Wire Fraud Convict Asks 2nd Circ. To Undo Verdict

    A lawyer for a former McKinsey & Co. consultant convicted of helping to illegally transfer money to Iran told the Second Circuit on Tuesday that a jury was not informed that family remittances were not prohibited by law.