More Employment Coverage

  • May 02, 2024

    Chancery Ruling Plays Role In Tesla's S&P Governance Grade

    Business rating agency Standard & Poor's has revised downward to "moderately negative" electric vehicle company Tesla Inc.'s grade for management and governance, pointing in part to CEO Elon Musk's dominant role, and the company's "uncommonly high" risk from lawsuits, including the Delaware Chancery Court's recent scuttling of his $56 billion pay plan.

  • May 02, 2024

    11th Circ. Rules Tribal Co. Is Not Immune In Trade Secrets Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit has revived a tribal-owned defense contractor's suit against another tribal-owned competitor and a former employee for allegedly stealing trade secrets, finding the competitor agreed to federal court jurisdiction when it participated in the bidding process for work on a missile detection system.

  • May 02, 2024

    Colo. Panel Says COVID Can Trigger Workers' Compensation

    A Colorado appellate court panel on Thursday ruled for the first time that COVID-19 can be considered an "occupational disease" under the state's workers' compensation law and affirmed the award of benefits to a woman whose husband died of the novel coronavirus while working at a skilled nursing facility.

  • May 02, 2024

    4th Circ. Finds Judge Appointment Legit In Black Lung Case

    The Fourth Circuit ruled that an administrative law judge who presided over a black lung benefits case was properly reappointed by the U.S. Department of Labor, rejecting Dominion Coal Corp.'s contention that his seating violated the Constitution's appointments clause.

  • May 02, 2024

    Why This Dallas Company Took On FTC's Noncompete Rule

    When Ryan LLC, a Dallas tax software and services provider, became the first company to sue the Federal Trade Commission last week over its ban on noncompete agreements, it was simply trying to preserve the rule of law — something every tax company needs in order to operate, according to chief legal officer John Smith.

  • May 02, 2024

    Feds Want Prison For Ex-Public Defender For Tax Fraud

    A former chief public defender in Minneapolis who in seeking leniency said he resigned in disgrace amid accusations that he failed to pay taxes for years on his private law firm should nonetheless spend eight months in prison after pleading guilty, prosecutors told a Minnesota federal court.

  • May 02, 2024

    Davis Wright Brings On MoFo Appellate Litigator In San Fran

    Davis Wright Tremaine LLP has brought on a former Morrison Foerster LLP partner in San Francisco, strengthening its appellate practice with an experienced appellate litigator who clerked for a U.S. Supreme Court justice, a California Supreme Court justice and other judges, the firm announced Thursday.

  • May 02, 2024

    GRSM50 Adds Employment Litigator From Calif. Solo Shop

    Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP, which is now going by the name GRSM50, is expanding its employment team, announcing Wednesday it is bringing on an employment litigator who previously ran his own firm to be a partner in the firm's San Diego office.

  • May 01, 2024

    5th Circ. Nixes Use Of US Law In Maritime Malaria Dispute

    The Fifth Circuit on Wednesday overturned an order permitting an Indian man to invoke U.S. law in his lawsuit accusing a Singaporean ship management company of negligence after he contracted malaria during a trip to Gabon while working aboard a Liberian-flagged cargo ship.

  • May 01, 2024

    Pa. Justices Asked To Determine If Workers' Comp Covers CBD

    An attorney representing himself — and, in a way, suing himself — will get an opportunity to convince the Pennsylvania Supreme Court that CBD oil and other nonprescription medicine should be covered by workers' compensation, according to a Tuesday order from the justices.

  • May 01, 2024

    Chamber Must Name Cos. It Reps In Noncompete Suit, FTC Says

    The Federal Trade Commission has asked a Texas federal judge to limit the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to representing only named members in its challenge to the agency's pending noncompetes ban, arguing the trade group can't hide behind the First Amendment to represent "millions of undisclosed members."

  • May 01, 2024

    Ex-Execs End Fight Over Syska Hennessy Stock Buyback Deal

    A former associate vice president and a managing director at engineering firm Syska Hennessy have ended their lawsuit alleging that the company made up a story about the pair soliciting employees to get out of buying back company stock.

  • May 01, 2024

    Fla., NY, DC Join Suit Demanding Halt To NCAA's NIL Policies

    Florida, New York and the District of Columbia on Wednesday joined Tennessee and Virginia in their antitrust lawsuit challenging the NCAA's policies on name, image and likeness rights, asking that the preliminary injunction barring enforcement of its NIL rules be made permanent.

  • May 01, 2024

    Judge Enjoins Baseball Bat Cos. In Fla. Trademark Fight

    A pair of companies owned by ex-MLB player Yoenis Céspedes have won a preliminary injunction against several businesses in an intellectual property dispute in Florida federal court over baseball bats, saying the former New York Mets outfielder's companies are likely to succeed on a trademark claim.

  • May 01, 2024

    Ohio Justices Say Workers' Comp Appeal Didn't Expire

    The Ohio Supreme Court on Wednesday allowed an injured Whirlpool Corp. worker to continue his appeal of an order denying him additional workers' compensation coverage, saying the state Industrial Commission's five-year limit on jurisdiction doesn't apply to his appeal in state court.

  • May 01, 2024

    Ex-Seton Hall President Fights Bid To Toss Whistleblower Suit

    Seton Hall University's former president is fighting to keep his explosive whistleblower suit against the school alive, arguing that he should be allowed to pursue his claims in court despite terms in his severance agreement stating otherwise because Seton Hall already violated that agreement by slashing his salary.

  • May 01, 2024

    NC Lawmakers Seek $231M Boost For Retired Judges, Others

    North Carolina legislators offered Wednesday a $231 million proposal to raise the retirement benefits for judicial and other former state workers, framing it as a cost-of-living adjustment that would become effective July 1.

  • April 30, 2024

    Chicago Hoopsters Drop NIL Antitrust Suit Against NCAA

    Two Chicago State University freshman basketball players on Tuesday dropped their suit alleging that the NCAA violated antitrust laws by declaring them ineligible to compete because they received compensation for their names, images and likenesses while in high school.

  • April 30, 2024

    Ex-DraftKings Exec Blocked From US Role At Rival Fanatics

    A Boston federal judge Tuesday blocked a former DraftKings executive from doing the same line of work for rival Fanatics in the U.S., citing his "evasive" testimony about his decampment to Fanatics.

  • April 30, 2024

    Trial Set For Lin Wood's Ex-Partners' Defamation Suit

    Controversial attorney Lin Wood will face trial in August in a defamation case brought by his former law partners who say he falsely accused them of trying to extort him, a Georgia federal judge decided Tuesday.

  • April 30, 2024

    Husch Blackwell Adds Labor & Employment Litigator In LA

    Husch Blackwell LLP announced Tuesday that it is expanding its labor and employment team, adding a litigator who ran his own firm for nearly a decade as partner to its Los Angeles office.

  • April 30, 2024

    Genova Burns Adds Labor, Bankruptcy Attys In Philly, NJ

    Genova Burns LLC expanded its offices in the Philadelphia area and New Jersey this week with the additions of attorneys specializing in labor and bankruptcy law.

  • April 29, 2024

    Paper Co.'s $31M Theft Claim Trimmed Before Coverage Trial

    A paper manufacturer's insurer needn't pay $2.7 million of the over $31 million the manufacturer said it lost from an employee's theft scheme, a Tennessee federal court ruled while rejecting the insurer's position that the company's $15 million settlement with the employee breached its policy.

  • April 29, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A multibillion-dollar Tesla trust proposal, a Truth Social bond, power plays over Prince's estate, and three in the ring for World Wrestling Entertainment. All of this and much more came up in Delaware Chancery Court dockets last week.

  • April 29, 2024

    Ga. Judicial Watchdog Sets Date For Judge's Ethics Trial

    The ethics hearing of a Georgia judge accused of calling litigants names, sexually harassing attorneys and courthouse employees, and trying to get a friend's children out of legal trouble is set for June, according to an order filed Friday in the Georgia Supreme Court.

Expert Analysis

  • The Latest Antitrust Areas For In-House Counsel To Watch

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    The U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission's increasingly aggressive approach to antitrust enforcement means in-house counsel should closely monitor five key compliance issues, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

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    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.

  • Del.'s Tesla Pay Takedown Tells Boards What Not To Do

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    The Delaware Chancery Court’s ruthless dissection of the Tesla board’s extreme departures from standard corporate governance in its January opinion striking down CEO Elon Musk’s $55 billion pay package offers a blow-by-blow guide to mistakes Delaware public companies can avoid when negotiating executive compensation, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • A Look Into How Jurors Reach High Damages Awards

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    In the wake of several large jury awards, Richard Gabriel and Emily Shaw at Decision Analysis shed light on challenges that jurors have in deciding them, the nonevidentiary and extra-legal methods they use to do so, and new research about the themes and jury characteristics of high-damages jurors.

  • Preparing For A New Wave Of Litigation Under Silicosis Rules

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    After the Division of Occupational Safety and Health of California issued an emergency temporary standard to combat noncompliance with assessments of workers' exposure to particles of crystalline silica, companies that manufacture, distribute or sell silica-containing products will need aggressive case-specific discovery to navigate a new wave of litigation, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Managing Competing Priorities In Witness Preparation

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    There’s often a divide between what attorneys and witnesses want out of the deposition process, but litigation teams can use several strategies to resolve this tension and help witnesses be more comfortable with the difficult conditions of testifying, say Ava Hernández and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Assessing Merger Guideline Feedback With Machine Learning

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    Large language modeling appears to show that public sentiment matches agency intent around the new merger control guidelines from the Federal Trade Commission and U.S. Justice Department, says Andrew Sfekas at Cornerstone Research.

  • Understanding And Working With The Millennials On Your Jury

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    Every trial attorney will be facing a greater proportion of millennials on their jury, as they now comprise the largest generation in the U.S., and winning them over requires an understanding of their views on politics, corporations and damages, says Clint Townson at Townson Litigation Consulting.

  • Grant Compliance Takeaways From Ga. Tech's FCA Settlement

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    Georgia Tech’s recent False Claims Act settlement over its failure to detect compliance shortcomings in a grant program was unique in that it involved a voluntary repayment of funds prior to the resolution, offering a few key lessons for universities receiving research funding from the government, says Jonathan Porter at Husch Blackwell.

  • Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Deferral Pointers For Employers After $700M Ohtani Deal

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    Darren Goodman and Christine Osvald-Mruz at Lowenstein Sandler examine the legal consequences of Shohei Ohtani's $700 million, 10-year contract with the Los Angeles Dodgers — a high-profile example of nonqualified deferred compensation — and offer lessons for employers of all sizes interested in similar deals.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

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