More Insurance Coverage

  • August 30, 2022

    Fla. Lab Owner Charged In NJ With $53M Medicare Fraud

    The 48-year-old owner of several medical labs scattered across the U.S. has been charged with health care fraud after federal prosecutors in New Jersey accused him of billing Medicare for $53 million in unnecessary genetic cancer screening tests.

  • August 30, 2022

    DC Tax Atty Seeks Exit From 'Captive' Insurance Swindle Suit

    A Washington, D.C., tax lawyer being sued over an alleged $19 million insurance swindle told a Maryland federal court Monday that a malpractice claim and all others in the suit were filed too late and must be thrown out.

  • August 30, 2022

    NYC Litigation Funder Admits Bankrolling Trip-And-Fall Scam

    A New York City financier told a Manhattan federal judge Tuesday that he funded a large litigation settlement scam that bilked insurers by having people stage falls to get unnecessary medical care, calling his conduct "beyond stupid" at his guilty plea.

  • August 29, 2022

    Antero Gets $1M Added To $11.8M Victory In Kickback Suit

    A Texas federal judge allowed Antero Resources Corp. to take back about $1 million worth of stock from an ex-employee already ordered to pay $11.8 million to the company for accepting kickbacks, but denied the company's request to recoup millions more from the worker.

  • August 29, 2022

    Cohen Tauber Atty Tells Judge Firm Hit By Ransomware Hack

    A Manhattan federal judge heard Monday that Cohen Tauber Spievack & Wagner PC, which represents a California vineyard in a $10 million insurance dispute over a recent wildfire, has been "brought down" by a ransomware attack and slowed operationally.

  • August 29, 2022

    5th Circ. Says Judge Was Right To Halt ACA Sex Bias Rule

    The Fifth Circuit upheld a permanent block on the federal government from requiring several religious medical providers to perform abortions or gender-confirmation surgeries or cover those procedures for their employees, despite an anti-bias provision in the Affordable Care Act.

  • August 29, 2022

    'Wrong Message' To Free Ex-Insys Exec Early, Judge Says

    A Massachusetts federal judge said Monday that cutting short the prison sentence of a former Insys Therapeutics executive convicted for an opioid kickback scheme would "send the wrong message."

  • August 29, 2022

    Koster Brady Liability Attys Join Hall Booth

    A team of attorneys who all previously worked at the New York boutique firm Koster Brady & Nagler LLP have moved to Hall Booth Smith PC to help launch a general liability practice group, the firm recently announced.

  • August 29, 2022

    Attorneys Get $71M In Fees For $1B Surfside Settlement Work

    The judge overseeing the consolidated litigation over the collapse of the Champlain Towers South condominium in Surfside, Florida, approved about $71 million in attorney fees on Monday for class counsel who secured a global settlement of more than $1 billion for the victims.

  • August 29, 2022

    Dodaro Matta 'Unaware' Energy Scam Could Be Legal Threat

    Dodaro Matta & Cambest PC didn't think a jilted investor in Alternative Energy Holdings had a leg to stand on when he included the law firm in a letter warning of liability, so the threat wasn't disclosed on an application for new legal malpractice insurance, the firm's attorney told a Pennsylvania state judge Monday.

  • August 29, 2022

    Gordon & Rees Expands Environmental Practice In Philly

    An environmental and toxic torts attorney with over 35 years of experience has left his own venture that first opened in the 1980s, to join Gordon & Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP, the firm recently announced.

  • August 26, 2022

    11th Circ. Backs Siblings' Fraud Convictions In Opioid Case

    The Eleventh Circuit refused to undo the convictions of an Alabama doctor and his sister, a nurse, who worked at a clinic run by the doctor, known for giving large amounts of opioid medication to people who didn't need it.

  • August 26, 2022

    Ex-Nets Player Pleads Out In NBA Health Care Fraud Dragnet

    Former NBA player Terrence Williams on Friday admitted his role in a $4 million scheme with other former pro basketball players to defraud the league's health care benefits plan by submitting claims for non-existent medical and dental treatments.

  • August 26, 2022

    Don't Miss It: Skadden, Kirkland Guide Week's Hot Deals

    A lot can happen in the world of mergers and acquisitions over the course of a week, and it's difficult to keep up with all the deals, including transactions helmed by Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP and Kirkland & Ellis LLP. Here, Law360 recaps the ones you may have missed.

  • August 25, 2022

    Benefit Plan Users Urge 5th Circ. To Affirm Class In ERISA Suit

    Three benefit plan participants urged a Fifth Circuit panel Thursday to deny a bid by a group of benefits providers to overturn class certification in their suit alleging excessive fees, arguing that over 200,000 proposed class members were subjected to the same predatory policies.

  • August 25, 2022

    Tax Court Says $1M Payment To Insurance Co. Deductible

    A more than $1 million payment that a Georgia limited liability company made to an insurance company in 2014 qualified as interest that could be deducted, the U.S. Tax Court said Thursday.

  • August 25, 2022

    Fla. Justices Allow Mintz Truppman To Pursue Fee Fight

    The Florida Supreme Court on Thursday reopened the way for Mintz Truppman PA to pursue a state court lawsuit against Lexington Insurance Co. and Cozen O'Connor over an attorney fee award, ruling that an intermediate appellate court improperly issued a writ prohibiting the suit.

  • August 25, 2022

    Centene Strikes $33M Deal To End Wash. Medicaid Fraud Suit

    Washington state and the federal government will receive $33 million from health care giant Centene Corp. to resolve a lawsuit alleging it overcharged the state's Medicaid program — a deal that amounts to the second-largest fraud recovery in the state's history.

  • August 24, 2022

    HNA Group To Appeal $185M Park Ave. Skyscraper Award

    HNA Group said Wednesday it was appealing a ruling confirming a $185.4 million arbitral award for an investor of its Manhattan skyscraper it accused of purposely failing to find a replacement for Major League Baseball, a former anchor tenant.

  • August 24, 2022

    UnitedHealth Kept Dud 401(k) Suite For Wells Fargo, Suit Says

    A group of workers levied new accusations against UnitedHealth in their suit alleging the company mismanaged their 401(k) plan, claiming Wednesday that new evidence suggests the company refused to ax underperforming funds to preserve a business relationship with Wells Fargo.

  • August 23, 2022

    10th Circ. Restores Ex-Worker's Insurance Co. Reprisal Suit

    A Tenth Circuit panel found Tuesday that a Black employee sufficiently alleged she was subjected to pervasive sexual and racial hostility at a life insurance company that eventually forced her out of the business, reversing in part a lower court's decision to entirely dismiss the suit.

  • August 23, 2022

    Surety Co. Says Feds Took Too Long To Collect Garlic Duties

    An insurer that covered Chinese garlic imports in 2004 is calling on the U.S. Court of International Trade to toss an enforcement action over unpaid duties, arguing that the government took too long to demand its $50,000 payment.

  • August 23, 2022

    Cell Co. Asks DC Circ. To Revive $1.1M ACA Penalty Suit

    Phone retailer Optimal Wireless urged the D.C. Circuit to revive its challenge to $1.1 million in Affordable Care Act health insurance penalties, arguing that a lower court judge erroneously characterized the penalty as a tax to justify dismissing the case.

  • August 23, 2022

    Wash. AG Can Keep $14.5M 'Trust Mill' Win

    A Texas-based insurance company cannot overturn a ruling that it misled seniors about estate planning and needed to pay $14.5 million in restitution and fines, according to a decision Monday by the Washington Court of Appeals.

  • August 23, 2022

    These Firms Have The Most Women In Equity Partnerships

    Law firms still have a long way to go when it comes to closing the gender gap, particularly at the top. But at these firms, women have made inroads into the upper ranks, and are smashing the glass ceiling that has long kept women from making it into leadership roles.

Expert Analysis

  • Why New Phase I Site Standard Matters For Real Estate

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    As an update to the preeminent standard for Phase I environmental site assessments — an essential part of transactional due diligence — is rolled out, parties to real estate transactions should adopt the new standard if they wish to claim liability protections under the Superfund law, say Lorene Boudreau at Ballard Spahr and Mitchell Wiest and Sara Redding at Roux.

  • The Implications Of COP26 For Legal Practitioners

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    Developments at the recent United Nations Climate Change Conference will create both opportunities and risks for lawyers — with many new laws, regulations and industry best practices to track, and a growing pipeline of new energy and infrastructure projects to facilitate, say Caroline May and Charles Winch at Norton Rose.

  • Infrastructure Act Measures Could Affect Holiday Shipping

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    While some measures in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act will take time to have an impact on shipping, other aspects of the law have the potential to help ease supply chain snarls quickly enough to expedite the movement of goods for the holiday shopping season, say Samuel Basch and Joseph Goldberg at Cole Scott.

  • Early ESG Due Diligence Can Minimize Risk, Maximize Reward

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    Companies can no longer afford to ignore environmental, social and corporate governance due diligence — the risks and rewards have become too great when it comes to pre-deal merger and acquisition transactions, supply chain audits, routine company audits and beyond, says Kimberly Jaimez at Pillsbury.

  • 6th Circ. ERISA Ruling Highlights Dubious Court Practices

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    A recent concurring opinion from Sixth Circuit Judge Eric Murphy in Card v. Principal Life Insurance is the first to question remands in Employee Retirement Income Security Act cases, opening a long-overdue dialogue on several questionable court practices that deviate from the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Sherman.

  • Alleging An LLC's Citizenship With Imperfect Information

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    Determining a limited liability company's citizenship to establish diversity jurisdiction and remove a case from state court can be difficult when the LLC's owners are unclear, and the Corporate Transparency Act will likely offer only limited help when it takes effect — but the right steps can still get a case to a federal courtroom, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • 9th Circ. Jurisdiction Ruling Guides On Class Action Strategy

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision revoking class certification in Moser v. Benefytt punted on personal jurisdiction questions left by the U.S. Supreme Court’s Bristol-Myers decision, but provides some guidance on how to raise jurisdictional defenses in nationwide class actions, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Humana FLSA Case Shows Risks Of Nurse Misclassification

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    The recent settlement in O'Leary v. Humana Insurance, a Wisconsin federal court case over the Fair Labor Standards Act employment status of 200 registered nurses, demonstrates the potential long-term and unexpected costs of erroneously classifying employees, says John Dudrey at Stoel Rives.

  • FCA Ruling Deepens Circuit Split Over Qui Tam Dismissals

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    The recent Third Circuit ruling in Polansky v. Executive Health Resources Inc. further widens a split over the standard for government-initiated motions to dismiss qui tam actions under the False Claims Act, and evinces increased scrutiny for motions filed after a defendant has entered the fray, say Kenneth Abell and Katherine Kulkarni at Abell Eskew.

  • 4 Economic Takeaways From 6th Circ. ProMedica Decision

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    The Sixth Circuit's recent decision to let ProMedica Health drop insurance contracts with its competitor St. Luke's Hospital highlights economic questions to consider when assessing alleged monopolization, particularly through provider network formation, say Loren Smith and Josephine Duh at The Brattle Group.

  • Disability Claim Ruling Holds ERISA Fiduciary Duty Lessons

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    A Massachusetts federal court’s recent disability claim ruling in Host v. First Unum Life Insurance admonished the defendant for breaching its Employee Retirement Income Security Act fiduciary duties when it failed to conduct an independent claim investigation, signaling that plan administrators should be wary of relying solely on employer communications, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Sherman.

  • Mental Health Parity Act: A Compliance Wake-Up Call

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    Recent developments, including the U.S. Department of Labor’s settlement with UnitedHealth, suggest that the DOL is taking a renewed and more aggressive approach to enforcing the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act, say Tim Kennedy and Anne Hall at Hall Benefits Law.

  • Insurance Commissioner's Agenda

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    State insurance commissioners discuss their enforcement and regulation priorities in this Expert Analysis series.

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