Labor

  • June 03, 2022

    Starbucks Denies Claims In NLRB's Buffalo Union Complaint

    Starbucks Corp. has formally denied allegations in a sprawling labor complaint that the National Labor Relations Board filed last month accusing the company of firing workers and interfering with a union campaign in Buffalo, New York, calling the claims "vague and ambiguous."

  • June 03, 2022

    Amazon Wants NLRB Atty DQ'd From Staten Island Hearing

    Amazon's challenge to a union's win at its Staten Island facility is heating up, with the company's latest bid to bar NLRB Regional Director Kathy Drew-King from having a field attorney represent her in its objection to the election, arguing that the same attorney already ruled against the e-commerce giant in Alabama.

  • June 03, 2022

    NLRB Attys, Locker Maker Say Judge Can't Call New Election

    National Labor Relations Board attorneys and a locker manufacturer told an Indiana federal judge Friday that the court doesn't have the power to order a new election in an injunction proceeding that agency prosecutors brought to make the company come to the bargaining table with a Teamsters local.

  • June 03, 2022

    Calif. Forecast: Ruling Expected In DA Bias Case

    In the coming week, attorneys should keep an eye out for a decision on motions in an age and gender discrimination case that five female prosecutors are bringing against a California district attorney's office. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in the Golden State.

  • June 03, 2022

    NY Forecast: Housing Authority Race Bias Suit At 2nd Circ.

    In the coming week, the Second Circuit will hear arguments in a New York City Housing Authority worker's race discrimination suit accusing the authority and former city council speaker of forcing her out of her job so she could be replaced with a Latino employee instead. Here, Law360 looks at that case as well as other major labor and employment cases on the docket in the Empire State.

  • June 03, 2022

    2nd Circ. Denies Rehearing In Benefits Rule Change Suit

    The Second Circuit refused a request for a rehearing on a denied appeal filed by a group of workers who alleged a union pension fund unlawfully required workers to stop working before they could receive their retirement benefits.

  • June 03, 2022

    Shuttered Unionized Hotel Must Pay Up To $33M In Severance

    Manhattan's Roosevelt Hotel must pay union-represented workers potentially millions in severance and hand over requested financial documents to comply with an arbitration award following a pandemic-related closure, a New York federal judge ruled, saying the arbitrator had the power to order the payments in his award.

  • June 03, 2022

    Culinary Institute Urges 2nd Circ. To Uphold Its Pay Bias Win

    A professor at the Culinary Institute of America was not paid less than a male colleague because of her gender, the institution told a Second Circuit panel, urging it to knock down the professor's appeal of a lower court's finding that gender bias did not factor into her salary.

  • June 03, 2022

    Rising Star: Sanford Heisler's Qiaojing Ella Zheng

    Sanford Heisler Sharp LLP's Qiaojing Ella Zheng has blazed a path for communities underrepresented in law and leverages her bicultural knowledge to serve clients, including securing an $8.3 million arbitration award in a contract breach case that spanned both Chinese and American legal systems, earning her a spot among the employment attorneys under age 40 honored by Law360 as Rising Stars.

  • June 02, 2022

    NLRB Calls For E-Notices Of Labor Penalties During Pandemic

    A majority of the full National Labor Relations Board on Thursday said employers that are closed or understaffed due to the COVID-19 pandemic but maintain electronic contact with workers must notify workers of unfair labor practices that way.

  • June 02, 2022

    NLRB Dissolves Single-Person Unit At Ohio Manufacturer

    A National Labor Relations Board official revoked an International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers local's status as a bargaining representative at an electronic control panel manufacturer in Ohio after the only person in the unit filed a decertification petition.

  • June 02, 2022

    Ex-AFGE Local President Pleads to Pilfering Union Funds

    The former president of a Boston union representing Transportation Security Administration workers pled guilty in federal court to stealing $3,000 in union funds, prosecutors said Thursday.

  • June 02, 2022

    Amazon Pans NLRB Judge's Ruling In NY Activist Firing Case

    A National Labor Relations Board judge mischaracterized evidence and misapplied agency precedent in his ruling that Amazon illegally fired a worker who clashed with a colleague during a 2020 protest, the company told the board in an appeal brief.

  • June 02, 2022

    NLRB Affidavits Greenlit In Starbucks Sacking Suit

    A Tennessee federal judge granted a request Thursday to allow the National Labor Relations Board to submit additional evidence into its suit seeking the immediate reinstatement of seven Starbucks employees who were allegedly fired for supporting a unionization effort at a Memphis store.

  • June 02, 2022

    Rabbi At Bargaining Not A Reason To Skip Talks, Judge Says

    A radiology company must return to the bargaining table with a health care workers union after refusing to negotiate when a rabbi was present during talks, a California federal judge ruled, chastising the business for submitting a response to NLRB prosecutors' injunction bid nearly 20 days late.

  • June 02, 2022

    Rising Star: Greenberg Traurig's Ashley M. Farrell Pickett

    Ashley M. Farrell Pickett of Greenberg Traurig LLP has advised major companies on how to navigate wage and hour and wrongful termination claims, including defending McDonald's and a Kentucky Fried Chicken franchisee against class actions, earning her a spot among the employment law practitioners under age 40 honored by Law360 Rising Stars.

  • June 01, 2022

    Amazon Hit With NLRB Complaint Over JFK8 Vote Conduct

    Amazon held illegal captive meetings and threatened to cut wages and benefits of workers at its JFK8 facility on Staten Island if they voted to unionize, prosecutors from the National Labor Relations Board said.

  • June 01, 2022

    Union Says Ex-Officer Illegally Used Member Data For Election

    The American Federation of Government Employees urged a D.C. federal judge to grant it a win against a former union national secretary-treasurer over his alleged misuse of a member database to bolster his campaign for union president, saying the ex-official knew his actions violated the organization's politics policy.

  • June 01, 2022

    Roofing Co. Wants Union Seniority Rule Challenge Axed

    A roofing company asked an Ohio federal judge Wednesday to knock down a suit filed by a Teamsters Local challenging an arbitrator's findings that the company did not violate seniority rules, arguing that the union can't nullify the arbitrator's ruling because it disagrees with it.

  • June 01, 2022

    Union's Momentum Builds With 100th Starbucks Election Win

    Nine months after Workers United petitioned for union elections at three Starbucks in Buffalo, New York, the upstart campaign to organize the coffee giant notched its 100th win, with no signs of slowing down. Here, Law360 checks in on the drive that has captivated the labor world as it blows past this milestone.

  • June 01, 2022

    NYC Says Nonprofit Lacks Standing To Halt Labor Peace Law

    A nonprofit has failed to establish standing in a suit challenging the legality of a New York City law ensuring union actions will not interfere with social services, the city told a federal judge, arguing that the group's effort to block the law should be axed.

  • June 01, 2022

    Split NLRB Panel Backs Hotel's Rebuke Of Union Recognition

    A split panel for the National Labor Relations Board determined that a Long Island, New York, hotel did not unlawfully withdraw recognition from a union last year, with the majority finding a petition plainly showed a loss of majority support for union representation among employees.

  • June 01, 2022

    Rising Star: Gibson Dunn's Megan Cooney

    Megan Cooney of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP steered Amazon to a trial victory when a California federal judge found that a former employee of the company was exempt from wage and hour requirements, earning her a spot among the employment law practitioners under age 40 honored by Law360 Rising Stars.

  • June 01, 2022

    Md. Gov. Vetoes Income Tax Deduction For Union Dues

    Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan vetoed a bill that would have allowed workers to deduct union dues from their income subject to state tax.

  • May 31, 2022

    Rabbi's Presence Excused Bargain Delay, Radiology Co. Says

    A radiology company asked a California federal judge Tuesday to deny a bid by National Labor Relations Board attorneys to force the business to bargain with a health care workers' union, arguing that the company temporarily stalled negotiations because a rabbi was present on the union's behalf.

Expert Analysis

  • Employer Arbitration Agreement Pointers From 2 Rulings

    Author Photo

    While two recent decisions from the New Jersey Supreme Court and Third Circuit address separate employment arbitration agreement enforceability issues, both reaffirm the strong federal policy favoring arbitration and offer some clarity on when a court versus an arbitrator determines whether an agreement exists, says Kirsten Grossman at Nukk-Freeman.

  • Employers Must Beware The Coming Union Organizing Storm

    Author Photo

    As economic unrest, layoff risks and other pandemic-related factors are likely to increase employee interest in union organizing once the public health emergency subsides, the best way companies can defend against worker unrest is by preparing management to respond quickly to concerns, says Daniel Johns at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Judging A Book: Schroeder Reviews 'Collegiality'

    Author Photo

    Mark Barringer's new book, "Collegiality and the Constitution," is an engaging, vibrant work of judicial history in Texas' Eastern District, and reveals an atmosphere of civility and respect among all those involved in the business of the court, says U.S. District Judge Robert W. Schroeder III.

  • What To Expect On Key Civil Procedure Issues From Barrett

    Author Photo

    Judge Amy Coney Barrett's prolific opinion writing on the Seventh Circuit reveals a clear picture of what we can expect from this jurist on issues such as state court personal jurisdiction over out-of-state defendants, Article III standing and the application of federal law in diversity actions, says James Wagstaffe at Wagstaffe von Loewenfeldt Busch.

  • A Quick Take On Trump's Contractor Diversity Training Order

    Author Photo

    On Tuesday, President Donald Trump issued an executive order that will prohibit government contractors from including nine concepts in their workplace diversity training materials, which contractors should review now to gauge their risk when the order becomes effective in November, says Lucas Hanback at Rogers Joseph.

  • NLRB Memo May Void Some Union-Employer Neutrality Pacts

    Author Photo

    A recent National Labor Relations Board guidance memo setting parameters for union organization neutrality agreements suggests that arrangements calling for more than ministerial aid from a nonunion employer may be vulnerable to legal challenge, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Mail-In Ballot Considerations For NLRB Union Elections

    Author Photo

    As mail-in voting for National Labor Relations Board union elections fosters void ballots, less participation and fewer favorable results for unions, campaign leaders should assess how eligible voters will view remote ballots before agreeing to the process, says Samuel Morris at Godwin Morris.

  • ERISA Claim Takeaways From 7th Circ. Union Pension Ruling

    Author Photo

    The Seventh Circuit’s recent decision in Bator v. District Council 4 — dismissing Employee Retirement Income Security Act claims against pension plan trustees and a union for allowing varying member contribution levels — shows key challenges in proving that trustees breached their fiduciary duties, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • State AG Enforcement Is Important For Workers' Rights

    Author Photo

    A recent increase in state attorney general labor and employment enforcement — including a challenge that prompted a New York federal judge to strike down the U.S. Department of Labor’s joint employer rule last week — sends an important message that worker protections are not easily revoked, says Catherine Ruckelshaus at the National Employment Law Project.

  • M&A Bargain Hunters Should Heed The WARN Act

    Author Photo

    Companies seeking opportune acquisitions amid the economic downturn should be aware that buyers are not immune from liability under the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act where transactions result in plant closings or mass layoffs, say Amelia Henderson and Kayla Haines at Smith Hulsey.

  • AGs In A Pandemic: James Talks NY Response

    Author Photo

    New York Attorney General Letitia James highlights her office's efforts to ease financial burdens for New York residents and businesses struggling during the pandemic by fighting fraud, policing employers, assisting with debt relief and more.

  • 6th Circ. Exclusive Bargaining Ruling Amplifies Janus Debate

    Author Photo

    The Sixth Circuit’s recent decision upholding Ohio’s exclusive bargaining law in Thompson v. Marietta Education Association highlights an ongoing dispute over whether the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2018 Janus decision — that forced agency fees violate government employees' First Amendment rights — extends to unions’ right to sole representation, says David Miller at Bryant Miller.

  • NCAA Publicity Rule Raises Labor, Antitrust, Policy Issues

    Author Photo

    New NCAA rules allow student-athletes to profit off their names, images and likenesses but beg several questions regarding video game licensing, the unionization of players, antitrust lawsuits and federal preemption, say Deborah Gubernick and Michelle Emeterio at Snell & Wilmer.

Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Employment Authority Labor archive.