Wage & Hour

  • May 17, 2024

    Delivery Apps Illegally Adding Extra Fees In Seattle, FTC Told

    DoorDash and Uber illegally charge "deceptive and unfair" junk fees to customers to cover the companies' costs to comply with a Seattle law mandating minimum wages for app-based workers, a consumer told the Federal Trade Commission in a complaint.

  • May 17, 2024

    NY Forecast: Doctor's Disability Bias Case Goes To 2nd Circ.

    In the coming week, the Second Circuit will hear a former New York University hospital doctor's bid to revive his suit claiming the hospital discriminated against him on the basis of his disability by denying him work accommodations before firing him. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • May 17, 2024

    DOL Wants Early Win In Support Co. Misclassification Suit

    The U.S. Department of Labor urged a Florida federal judge to grant it a pretrial win in its suit accusing a customer support services provider of misclassifying 22,000 workers as independent contractors, saying it's clear the company has near-total control over their work.

  • May 17, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Justices To Hear If Prop 22 Constitutional

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for California Supreme Court oral arguments regarding the validity of the Proposition 22 ballot measure from 2020. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • May 17, 2024

    Flight Crews Get Step Closer To In-Flight Nursing Breaks

    The enactment of the Federal Aviation Administration Reauthorization Act paves the way for in-flight crew members to finally have the right to express breast milk by requiring the FAA to address safety concerns head-on, attorneys say.

  • May 17, 2024

    Worker's OT Suit Against Oilfield Co. Pushed To Arbitration

    An oilfield services company can push into arbitration an ex-oil rig worker's unpaid overtime suit, after a Texas federal judge sided with the company, staying the suit pending arbitration.

  • May 16, 2024

    FTC Can't Make Albertsons, Kroger Produce Divestiture Docs

    An administrative law judge on Thursday denied the Federal Trade Commission's "premature" bid to compel Kroger and Albertsons to fork over documents related to negotiations for the companies' expanded divestiture plan amid the commission's in-house challenge to the grocers' merger.

  • May 16, 2024

    EPA Doctor Not A Whistleblower For Slamming Lead Plan

    A former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency pediatrician and epidemiologist who publicly criticized the EPA's plan to reduce lead in drinking water as inadequate is not protected by federal whistleblower law, the Federal Circuit said Thursday.

  • May 16, 2024

    Home Health Co., Aides Settle OT Suit Over Shift Tracking

    A home health care organization and two workers asked an Ohio federal judge Thursday to sign off on a $62,000 settlement resolving claims that the company underpaid overtime wages by separately tracking the day and night shift hours that employees worked in a single week.

  • May 16, 2024

    High Court Decision Requiring A Stay Raises More Questions

    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous decision Thursday finding that federal courts must honor a request to stay a case after ordering the dispute into arbitration leaves an important subsequent question unresolved: What happens if neither party requests a stay?

  • May 16, 2024

    Calif. Panel Says Signature Wasn't Rebutted On Arbitral Pact

    A worker failed to show that a signature in an employee handbook containing an arbitration clause wasn't his, a California state appeals court ruled, flipping a trial court's decision that denied a mining company's bid to arbitrate his wage and hour suit.

  • May 16, 2024

    Wis. Appeals Court Undoes Corrections Workers' Wage Class

    A Wisconsin appeals court dissolved a class of state Department of Corrections employees who argued they are owed pay for the time they spent undergoing security checks and walking to and from their assigned work posts, ruling a lower court used an invalid legal theory in certifying the group.

  • May 16, 2024

    Ex-Bronx DA Worker Says Discrimination Suit Should Stand

    A former employee at the Bronx District Attorney's Office said Thursday she supported her claims that the office discriminated against her for seeking medical leave and denied her a promotion because she's Black, urging a New York federal court to keep alive her suit alive.

  • May 16, 2024

    Pressure Mounts On Biden Admin To Finalize Regulations

    The U.S. Department of Labor and other federal agencies face pressure to complete rulemaking this month because a window opens soon that will make it easier for Republicans in Congress to wipe away regulations if they and former President Donald Trump sweep the November elections, experts told Law360.

  • May 16, 2024

    Delta, Flight Attendants Ink $16M Deal To End Wage Suit

    Delta Air Lines flight attendants reached a nearly $16 million settlement with the company in an almost decadelong suit accusing the airline of wage statement violations, they told a California federal judge, saying the "extremely favorable" deal should be approved because it would give class members close to full reimbursement.

  • May 16, 2024

    SC Convenience Store Pays $154K For OT Violations

    A gas station and convenience store in South Carolina paid nearly $154,000 for denying workers overtime rates, the U.S. Department of Labor said.

  • May 16, 2024

    Justices Say Courts Must Stay Suits Sent To Arbitration

    The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously concluded Thursday that federal courts do not have discretion to toss a case once it's decided that the claims belong in arbitration, ruling in a wage and overtime suit brought by delivery drivers against their employer.

  • May 16, 2024

    Justices Say Deadline To Appeal Furlough Denial Is Flexible

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday revived a Pentagon employee's dispute seeking an exemption from a furlough, saying that a missed 60-day deadline to appeal the denied exemption does not put the matter out of federal courts' jurisdiction.

  • May 15, 2024

    Georgia Justices Weigh State Immunity In Trooper's Wage Suit

    Georgia's Department of Public Safety urged the state's highest court on Wednesday to undo a Georgia Court of Appeals decision that revived a state trooper's suit alleging that the department failed to pay him owed overtime for time spent in training, arguing that the state never waived its sovereign immunity privilege.

  • May 15, 2024

    Worker Updates Boot-Up Suit After Judge Axes State Claims

    A former call center worker on Tuesday lodged an amended class action complaint seeking boot-up time wages from a home healthcare company, raising only federal claims after a Michigan federal judge earlier this year stripped state law allegations from the suit.

  • May 15, 2024

    Wage Damages Update Isn't Retroactive, NJ Justices Say

    The New Jersey Supreme Court on Wednesday held an amendment to the state's wage laws adding liquidated damages and extending the statute of limitations should only be applied to conduct that occurred after its effective date, backing the dismissal of some claims brought by laborers alleging unpaid pre- and post-shift work.

  • May 15, 2024

    Staffing Co.'s Wage Settlement Gets Approval On 4th Attempt

    After three tries, a Georgia federal judge approved a settlement Wednesday between a staffing firm and two workers who alleged that the firm shorted them on wages by making them work through unpaid meal breaks, finding the latest amendment fixed previous inconsistencies.

  • May 15, 2024

    School District, Teachers Can't Snag Win In Equal Pay Fight

    Neither a Pennsylvania school district nor the female teachers accusing it of paying them less than their male colleagues can snag a win in two consolidated Equal Pay Act suits, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, saying there are still open questions in the cases.

  • May 15, 2024

    Tenn. Restaurant Workers Get Approval Of Tip Violation Deal

    A Nashville, Tennessee, restaurant will pay $375,000 to end a collective action claiming it stiffed tipped employees on their full wages, after a Tennessee federal judge signed off on a settlement. 

  • May 15, 2024

    AstraZeneca Sales Reps Win Early Cert. In Gender Bias Suit

    An Illinois federal judge on Tuesday granted a bid by workers to conditionally certify a collective in a lawsuit alleging AstraZeneca paid women less than men, giving the green light for notices to be sent out to female sales representatives who have worked at the pharmaceutical giant since late 2018.

Expert Analysis

  • History Supports 2nd Circ. View Of FAA Transport Exemption

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    In the circuit split over when transport workers are exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, sparked by the 2022 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Southwest Airlines v. Saxon, the Second Circuit reached a more faithful interpretation — one supported by historical litigation and legislative context, though perhaps arrived at via the wrong route, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • Employers Need Clarity On FLSA Joint Employer Liability

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    A judicial patchwork of multifactor tests to determine joint employment liability has led to unpredictable results, and only congressional action or enactment of a uniform standard to which courts will consistently defer can give employers the clarity needed to structure their relationships with workers, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Calif. Independent Contractor Lessons From Grubhub Suit

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    California courts have been creating little in the way of clarity when it comes to the employment status of gig workers — and a recent federal court decision in Lawson v. Grubhub illustrates how status may change with the winds of litigation, offering four takeaways for businesses that rely on delivery drivers, say Esra Hudson and Marah Bragdon at Manatt.

  • Labor Collusion Loss Will Shape DOJ's Case Strategy

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    Following the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent loss in United States v. Manahe, tallying its trial score record to 0-3 in labor-related antitrust cases over the past year, defendants can expect that the DOJ will try to exclude defense evidence and argue for more favorable jury instructions, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Staffing Company Considerations Amid PAGA Uncertainty

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    The impending California Supreme Court decision in Adolph v. Uber is expected to affect staffing companies, specifically how the proliferation of nonindividual Private Attorneys General Act claims are handled when the individual claim is compelled to arbitration, say Sarah Kroll-Rosenbaum and Harrison Thorne at Akerman.

  • Eye On Compliance: Joint Employment

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    Madonna Herman at Wilson Elser breaks down the key job conditions that led to a recent National Labor Relations Board finding of joint employment, and explains the similar standard established under California case law — providing a guide for companies that want to minimize liability when relying on temporary and contract workers.

  • How Unions Could Stem Possible Wave Of Calif. PAGA Claims

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    Should the California Supreme Court hold in Adolph v. Uber that the nonindividual portions of Private Attorneys General Act claims survive even after individual claims go to arbitration, employers and unions could both leverage the holding in Oswald v. Murray to stifle the resurgence in representative suits, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Tips For Defending Employee Plaintiff Depositions

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    A plaintiff cannot win their employment case through a good deposition, but they can certainly lose it with a bad one, so an attorney should take steps to make sure the plaintiff does as little damage as possible to their claim, says Preston Satchell at LexisNexis.

  • Predictions On Salary Levels In Proposed DOL Overtime Rule

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    In May, the U.S. Department of Labor is expected to propose new salary thresholds for overtime exemptions for both executive, administrative and professional employees and highly compensated earners under the Fair Labor Standards Act, and based on methodologies used in recent DOL rules, it will likely increase both thresholds, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Whistleblowing Insights From 'Dahmer'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with DS Smith's Josh Burnette about how the show "Dahmer – Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story" provides an extreme example of the perils of ignoring repeat complaints — a lesson employers could apply in the whistleblower context.

  • Retail Employer Strategies For LA Fair Work Week Ordinance

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    The recently effective Los Angeles Fair Work Week Ordinance changes how employers in the retail trade industry approach scheduling and hiring employees, so they should consider creating new standardized forms and procedures to maintain compliance and avoid penalties, say Thomas Petrides and Charlie Wang at Vedder Price.

  • AI For Advancing Diversity In The Workplace: Friend Or Foe?

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    In the wake of calls for increased workplace diversity, employers are turning to artificial intelligence to automate hiring and cut costs to reach environmental, social and governance objectives, but this technology requires human oversight to minimize biases and discrimination, say Consuela Pinto and Dawn Siler-Nixon at FordHarrison.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Attendance Policies

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    Employee attendance problems are among the most common reasons for disciplinary action and discharge, which is why a clear policy neatly laid out in an employee handbook is necessary to articulate expectations for workers and support an employer's position should any attendance-related disputes arise, says Kara Shea at Butler Snow.