More Employment Coverage

  • May 02, 2024

    GRSM50 Adds Employment Litigator From Calif. Solo Shop

    Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP, which is now going by the name GRSM50, is expanding its employment team, announcing Wednesday it is bringing on an employment litigator who previously ran his own firm to be a partner in the firm's San Diego office.

  • May 01, 2024

    5th Circ. Nixes Use Of US Law In Maritime Malaria Dispute

    The Fifth Circuit on Wednesday overturned an order permitting an Indian man to invoke U.S. law in his lawsuit accusing a Singaporean ship management company of negligence after he contracted malaria during a trip to Gabon while working aboard a Liberian-flagged cargo ship.

  • May 01, 2024

    Pa. Justices Asked To Determine If Workers' Comp Covers CBD

    An attorney representing himself — and, in a way, suing himself — will get an opportunity to convince the Pennsylvania Supreme Court that CBD oil and other nonprescription medicine should be covered by workers' compensation, according to a Tuesday order from the justices.

  • May 01, 2024

    Chamber Must Name Cos. It Reps In Noncompete Suit, FTC Says

    The Federal Trade Commission has asked a Texas federal judge to limit the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to representing only named members in its challenge to the agency's pending noncompetes ban, arguing the trade group can't hide behind the First Amendment to represent "millions of undisclosed members."

  • May 01, 2024

    Ex-Execs End Fight Over Syska Hennessy Stock Buyback Deal

    A former associate vice president and a managing director at engineering firm Syska Hennessy have ended their lawsuit alleging that the company made up a story about the pair soliciting employees to get out of buying back company stock.

  • May 01, 2024

    Fla., NY, DC Join Suit Demanding Halt To NCAA's NIL Policies

    Florida, New York and the District of Columbia on Wednesday joined Tennessee and Virginia in their antitrust lawsuit challenging the NCAA's policies on name, image and likeness rights, asking that the preliminary injunction barring enforcement of its NIL rules be made permanent.

  • May 01, 2024

    Judge Enjoins Baseball Bat Cos. In Fla. Trademark Fight

    A pair of companies owned by ex-MLB player Yoenis Céspedes have won a preliminary injunction against several businesses in an intellectual property dispute in Florida federal court over baseball bats, saying the former New York Mets outfielder's companies are likely to succeed on a trademark claim.

  • May 01, 2024

    Ohio Justices Say Workers' Comp Appeal Didn't Expire

    The Ohio Supreme Court on Wednesday allowed an injured Whirlpool Corp. worker to continue his appeal of an order denying him additional workers' compensation coverage, saying the state Industrial Commission's five-year limit on jurisdiction doesn't apply to his appeal in state court.

  • May 01, 2024

    Ex-Seton Hall President Fights Bid To Toss Whistleblower Suit

    Seton Hall University's former president is fighting to keep his explosive whistleblower suit against the school alive, arguing that he should be allowed to pursue his claims in court despite terms in his severance agreement stating otherwise because Seton Hall already violated that agreement by slashing his salary.

  • May 01, 2024

    NC Lawmakers Seek $231M Boost For Retired Judges, Others

    North Carolina legislators offered Wednesday a $231 million proposal to raise the retirement benefits for judicial and other former state workers, framing it as a cost-of-living adjustment that would become effective July 1.

  • April 30, 2024

    Chicago Hoopsters Drop NIL Antitrust Suit Against NCAA

    Two Chicago State University freshman basketball players on Tuesday dropped their suit alleging that the NCAA violated antitrust laws by declaring them ineligible to compete because they received compensation for their names, images and likenesses while in high school.

  • April 30, 2024

    Ex-DraftKings Exec Blocked From US Role At Rival Fanatics

    A Boston federal judge Tuesday blocked a former DraftKings executive from doing the same line of work for rival Fanatics in the U.S., citing his "evasive" testimony about his decampment to Fanatics.

  • April 30, 2024

    Trial Set For Lin Wood's Ex-Partners' Defamation Suit

    Controversial attorney Lin Wood will face trial in August in a defamation case brought by his former law partners who say he falsely accused them of trying to extort him, a Georgia federal judge decided Tuesday.

  • April 30, 2024

    Husch Blackwell Adds Labor & Employment Litigator In LA

    Husch Blackwell LLP announced Tuesday that it is expanding its labor and employment team, adding a litigator who ran his own firm for nearly a decade as partner to its Los Angeles office.

  • April 30, 2024

    Genova Burns Adds Labor, Bankruptcy Attys In Philly, NJ

    Genova Burns LLC expanded its offices in the Philadelphia area and New Jersey this week with the additions of attorneys specializing in labor and bankruptcy law.

  • April 29, 2024

    Paper Co.'s $31M Theft Claim Trimmed Before Coverage Trial

    A paper manufacturer's insurer needn't pay $2.7 million of the over $31 million the manufacturer said it lost from an employee's theft scheme, a Tennessee federal court ruled while rejecting the insurer's position that the company's $15 million settlement with the employee breached its policy.

  • April 29, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A multibillion-dollar Tesla trust proposal, a Truth Social bond, power plays over Prince's estate, and three in the ring for World Wrestling Entertainment. All of this and much more came up in Delaware Chancery Court dockets last week.

  • April 29, 2024

    Ga. Judicial Watchdog Sets Date For Judge's Ethics Trial

    The ethics hearing of a Georgia judge accused of calling litigants names, sexually harassing attorneys and courthouse employees, and trying to get a friend's children out of legal trouble is set for June, according to an order filed Friday in the Georgia Supreme Court.

  • April 29, 2024

    Wash. Solar Co. Will Pay $465K To End Noncompete Suit

    A Washington state judge has given a preliminary nod to a $465,000 settlement to end litigation accusing a residential solar energy equipment company of forcing workers to sign illegal noncompete clauses as a condition of employment.

  • April 29, 2024

    Conn. Health Co., Competitor Eye Deal In Trade Secrets Suit

    Connecticut-based healthcare marketing firm Primacy LLC and a direct competitor accused of poaching top executive Matt Cyr are looking to settle a trade secrets lawsuit by pausing a preliminary injunction hearing and engaging a new magistrate judge to help them work out their differences.

  • April 29, 2024

    NCAA, Bush Tussle Over Strength Of Defamation Claims

    Former USC running back Reggie Bush's defamation brawl with the NCAA continued on Monday as the 2005 Heisman Trophy winner urged an Indiana state court to keep his lawsuit alive, arguing it is too early to throw the case out as the NCAA wishes.

  • April 26, 2024

    Remote Class, Medical News, More: Texas High Court Roundup

    The Supreme Court of Texas ruled on a handful of issues Friday, including the liability of universities for switching to remote learning, the responsibility of an employer for not providing a worker with concerning medical news and how a settlement credit should be applied to a final judgment.

  • April 26, 2024

    Ex-McKinsey Partner Says Firm Made Him Opioids 'Scapegoat'

    A former McKinsey & Co. partner lobbed defamation claims at the consulting firm, claiming Friday that it lied to the government and the public about his purported role in deleting evidence amid government investigations into the firm's work with opioid manufacturers, an alleged scheme designed to make him the "scapegoat."

  • April 26, 2024

    St. John's Hoops Players Say NCAA Can't Block Their Play

    Two St. John's University basketball players sued the NCAA Friday in New York, saying it arbitrarily denied them waivers for its "five-year rule" that prohibits student-athletes from competing in more than four seasons in any one sport, after they lost a season during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • April 26, 2024

    Frito-Lay Subcontractors Hit With $72M Factory Death Verdict

    A Dallas County jury has awarded a nearly $72 million verdict to the family of a man who plunged to his death at a Frito-Lay facility, finding that his employer and another subcontractor working at the facility were liable for the accident.

Expert Analysis

  • Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • What To Watch As Justices Consider Appeal Deadline Case

    Author Photo

    Next week, in Harrow v. U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Supreme Court will consider for the first time whether a statutory deadline for appealing from a federal agency to an Article III court is jurisdictional, setting the stage for a decision that could dramatically reshape the landscape for challenging agency decisions, say attorneys at MoloLamken.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

    Author Photo

    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • What 2 Years Of Ukraine-Russia Conflict Can Teach Cos.

    Author Photo

    A few key legal lessons for the global business community since Russia's invasion of Ukraine could help protect global commerce in times of future conflict, including how to respond to disparate trade restrictions and sanctions, navigate war-related contract disputes, and protect against heightened cybersecurity risks, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • 3 Litigation Strategies To Combat 'Safetyism'

    Author Photo

    Amid the rise of safetyism — the idea that every person should be free from the risk of harm or discomfort — among jurors and even judges, defense counsel can mount several tactics from the very start of litigation to counteract these views and blunt the potential for jackpot damages, says Ann Marie Duffy at Hollingsworth.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

    Author Photo

    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • What To Know About Employee Retention Credit Disclosures

    Author Photo

    Employers that filed potentially erroneous employee retention credit claims should take certain steps to determine whether the IRS’ voluntary disclosure program is a good fit and, if so, prepare a strong application before the window closes on March 22, say attorneys at Dentons.

  • 5 Things Trial Attorneys Can Learn From Good Teachers

    Author Photo

    Jennifer Cuculich at IMS Legal Strategies recounts lessons she learned during her time as a math teacher that can help trial attorneys connect with jurors, from the importance of framing core issues to the incorporation of different learning styles.

  • What Workplace Violence Law Means For Texas Healthcare

    Author Photo

    While no federal laws address violence against healthcare workers, Texas has recently enacted statutory protections that take effect later this year — so facilities in the state should understand their new obligations under the law, and employers in other states would be wise to take notice as well, say attorneys at Bradley Arant.

  • Business Litigators Have A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

    Author Photo

    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

  • 5 Ways To Hone Deposition Skills And Improve Results

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Depositions must never be taken for granted in the preparations needed to win a dispositive motion or a trial, and five best practices, including knowing when to hire a videographer, can significantly improve outcomes, says James Argionis at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Skiing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    A lifetime of skiing has helped me develop important professional skills, and taught me that embracing challenges with a spirit of adventure can allow lawyers to push boundaries, expand their capabilities and ultimately excel in their careers, says Andrea Przybysz at Tucker Ellis.

  • Navigating Trade Secret Litigation In A High-Stakes Landscape

    Author Photo

    Recent eye-popping verdicts are becoming increasingly common in trade secret litigation — but employers can take several proactive steps to protect proprietary information and defend against misappropriation accusations in order to avoid becoming the next headline, say Jessica Mason and Jack FitzGerald at Foley & Lardner.

Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Employment Authority Other archive.