More Employment Coverage

  • May 24, 2022

    9th Circ. Reverses State Farm's Win Over Injured Worker

    A Ninth Circuit panel overturned a lower court's ruling awarding summary judgment to a State Farm unit, finding there is a genuine dispute whether an employee exclusion applies to bar coverage for an individual's suit over a work injury.

  • May 23, 2022

    NY Lawmakers Grant 1-Year Grace Period For Sex Abuse Suits

    The New York Assembly on Monday passed the Adult Survivors Act, which, if signed by the governor, would open up sexual assault and abuse litigation by creating a one-year window for adult survivors whose claims are otherwise time-barred.

  • May 23, 2022

    Pot Cos. Verano, Harvest Win $228K In Row With Ex-Worker

    Cannabis companies Verano Holdings LLC and Harvest Health & Recreation Inc. and several other defendants who were hit with a Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act by a former worker over his arrest, have asked a Colorado federal judge to confirm a $228,000 combined award they were given by an arbitrator.

  • May 23, 2022

    DA Rebuffs Trump Org, CFO's Bid To Escape Tax Fraud Case

    The Manhattan district attorney said the tax fraud evidence against longtime Trump Organization finance chief Allen Weisselberg has nothing to do with politics or his previous federal grand jury testimony, waving off the CFO's narrative of a tainted prosecution.

  • May 23, 2022

    Tech Co. Beats Bias Suit From Worker Imprisoned For Arson

    A California federal court threw out a lawsuit from a former technology company manager currently incarcerated for setting his supervisor's house on fire, determining that the ex-worker didn't show that reporting alleged harassment earned him a cold shoulder on leave requests.

  • May 23, 2022

    Miami Hotel Operator Says Firing Was Revenge For Divorce

    An Argentinian man who previously ran a luxury South Beach hotel told a Florida federal judge on Monday that his former father-in-law unjustly fired him from his job as an act of revenge for his divorce and owes him millions in damages.

  • May 23, 2022

    NFLer's Drug Test Suspension Suit Thrown Out Over Delay

    A Texas federal judge on Monday threw out a suit by former Dallas Cowboys player La'el Collins over a five-game suspension stemming from his alleged violation of the NFL's drug testing policies, saying he has failed to prosecute the case.

  • May 23, 2022

    Home Care Co., Ex-Exec Settle Trade Secrets Row

    Home health care coordinator CareCentrix Inc. has reached a settlement with a former executive it accused of spying for competitor Signify Health LLC and will voluntarily dismiss the lawsuit, the parties told a Delaware federal court Monday.

  • May 23, 2022

    Roche Freedman Defends Subpoenas To Ex-Partner's Clients

    Law firm Roche Freedman LLP hit back at arguments that it was improperly bombarding former clients with subpoenas, telling a New York federal court that the subpoenas are highly relevant to its case against a former name partner.

  • May 23, 2022

    Legal PR Firm Caught In Trade Secrets Row Over New Biz

    Legal public relations firm Baretz+Brunelle LLC wants a New York federal court to declare it didn't steal any trade secrets when it hired Decipher Investigative Intelligence's co-founder, who now heads a rival legal recruiting intelligence division at B+B that will compete directly with Decipher.

  • May 20, 2022

    Objectors Say Pizza Chain Hack Deal Unfairly Ignores CCPA

    A proposed settlement that would end litigation stemming from California Pizza Kitchen's September data breach is a "rotten deal" because it ignores potentially valuable claims under California's Consumer Privacy Act, two objectors have claimed.

  • May 20, 2022

    Inaction On Retention Credit Risks Nonprofit Staff Cuts

    In the face of congressional inaction on legislation to restore the employee retention tax credit for the fourth quarter of 2021, nonprofit organizations could find themselves having to lay off workers or unable to rehire laid off employees.

  • May 20, 2022

    Texas Justices Rule Baylor Lab Owes Fired Exec Commission

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday ruled that a fired sales executive was still entitled to commission payments from a Houston medical laboratory because his contract didn't expressly condition the payments on his employment status, a decision two dissenting justices called an ill-advised departure from court precedent.

  • May 20, 2022

    IRS Issues Revisions To Employee Benefit Plan Filings

    The Internal Revenue Service issued revisions Friday to forms for reporting employee benefit plans beginning in 2022, largely adopting proposed changes to those filings introduced in September.

  • May 20, 2022

    Builder, Insurer Settle Over Worker's $1.2M Injury Award

    A boat dock construction company and Travelers have agreed to settle a dispute over coverage of a $1.2 million judgment awarded to a worker who lost his thumb in a drilling accident, the construction company told a Texas federal court.

  • May 20, 2022

    Ex-MLBer Says Spring Training Makes Fla. Ideal For Bat IP Suit

    A Major League Baseball bat-making business run by ex-New York Mets player Yoenis Céspedes says a trademark infringement lawsuit against the company's former owner should proceed in Florida federal court, arguing the "copycat" bats have been promoted to players in the state during spring training.

  • May 20, 2022

    Westlake Chemical Partly Dodges Explosion Suit

    Westlake Chemical Corp. dodged part of a suit alleging a chemical explosion at a Louisiana facility led to various medical issues for its workers, after a federal judge determined no expert testimony was available to back the workers' claims.

  • May 19, 2022

    NM Supreme Court Affirms $165M Verdict In FedEx Crash Suit

    The New Mexico Supreme Court on Thursday upheld a record $165 million jury award to the family of a mother and four-year-old daughter killed when a FedEx tractor trailer collided with their small pickup truck, saying the verdict was supported by ample evidence and the award was not excessive.

  • May 19, 2022

    Ex-Celtic Davis Faces Bail Review In NBA Health Fraud Case

    A Manhattan federal judge said Thursday she will review a bail package for retired Boston Celtics center Glen "Big Baby" Davis after he allegedly violated his conditions of release yet again in the NBA health plan fraud case.

  • May 19, 2022

    Fla. Utility Cops To Criminal Safety Charge After Fatal Blast

    Tampa Electric Company has agreed to plead guilty to a criminal charge of willfully violating workplace safety rules and pay a $500,000 fine after a 2017 explosion at one of its coal-fired power plants in Florida killed five workers, federal prosecutors announced Thursday.

  • May 19, 2022

    Tyson & Mendes Adds Construction Partner In Las Vegas

    Civil litigation defense firm Tyson & Mendes LLP has added the Las Vegas managing partner at Litchfield Cavo LLP who specializes in construction liability, products liability and employment matters, among other areas.

  • May 19, 2022

    Medtronic Worker Can't Escape $1.3M Claim In Poaching Suit

    A former regional sales manager for Globus Medical Inc. can't duck the company's demand that he repay $1.3 million after jumping ship for rival company Medtronic, if only because the contracts he signed were ambiguous on what he was liable to repay, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled.

  • May 19, 2022

    Littler Picks Shareholder To Be First Chief Data Officer

    Littler Mendelson PC said Thursday that it has picked a shareholder from its Miami office who founded Littler CaseSmart and Littler onDemand to be its first chief data officer.

  • May 19, 2022

    Egg Farm Settles EEOC Suit Claiming It Ignored Sex Assault

    A Michigan egg farm has agreed to settle a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission lawsuit accusing it of ignoring complaints from an employee who said she was sexually assaulted by her supervisor, then barring her from coming to work as punishment for going to the police.

  • May 19, 2022

    Littler Adds Wood Smith Employment Litigator In LA

    Littler Mendelson PC is expanding by adding a Wood Smith Henning & Berman LLP labor and employment litigator as a shareholder in its Los Angeles office.

Expert Analysis

  • NY Ruling Correctly Deems Legal Finance Docs Irrelevant

    Author Photo

    A New York appeals court's recent decision in Worldview Entertainment v. Woodrow joins a growing trend of decisions denying discovery of litigation funding documents, highlighting that commercial legal finance should be treated just like any other financing in commercial litigation, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • Addressing Low Response Rates In Expert Surveys

    Author Photo

    While expert witnesses are receiving dwindling responses to the surveys they conduct to gauge public beliefs and attitudes, recent cases show that a low response rate need not make a survey inadmissible in court, say Kristen Backor and Yamimi Jena at Charles River Associates, and Brandon Duke at Winston & Strawn.

  • 10 Tips For An Effective BYOD And Remote Access Policy

    Author Photo

    Jason Pill at Phelps Dunbar lays out considerations for employee bring-your-own-device and remote access policies, particularly as remote work becomes more common and in light of new standards set by the recently passed Cyber Incident Reporting for Critical Infrastructure Act.

  • Worker Migration Calls For Fla., NY Employment Law Review

    Author Photo

    Newly remote employees who left New York for Florida during the pandemic should consider the applicable state noncompete laws, because restrictive covenants in employment agreements can seriously affect an employee's post-termination options, say Yaniv Adar and Michelle Genet Bernstein at Mark Migdal.

  • Employer Travel Benefits Options For Abortion Care Post-Roe

    Author Photo

    Given the likelihood that Roe v. Wade will be overturned, and with the proliferation of state legislation restricting abortion access, employers may want to consider the legal implications of several options to expand travel reimbursement benefits for employees who seek abortion services, say Danita Merlau and Ben Conley at Seyfarth.

  • Overcommunicate With Your Summer Associates This Year

    Author Photo

    2022 summer associates have had limited opportunities for professional interactions due to the pandemic, so supervising attorneys should prioritize intentional overcommunication by emphasizing importance of tone and content of emails, sharing feedback immediately, and more, says Julie Schrager at Faegre Drinker.

  • Complying With Electronic Monitoring Laws In NY And Beyond

    Author Photo

    New York's recently effective requirement to alert employees of computer surveillance practices is part of a wider trend of workplace privacy laws at the state and local level, and should prompt employers to closely track their local laws, and update their policies and employee acknowledgement forms, say Harris Mufson and Lizzy Brilliant at Gibson Dunn.

  • Nev. Case Highlights Settlement Authority Dilemmas For Cos.

    Author Photo

    A Nevada federal court's recent decision in Ceja v. The Vons Companies illustrates the pitfalls of misinterpreting a court order requiring a representative with full settlement authority to be present at negotiations, and is a reminder to consider that courts differ as to what full settlement authority means in practice, says Richard Mason at MasonADR.

  • 2 Approaches To NY Choice Of Law In Employment Contracts

    Author Photo

    Two differing New York federal court decisions on restrictive covenants should be taken into account by employers and employees arguing for or against the application of a choice-of-law provision in New York courts, say John Chun and Silvia Stockman at Herrick Feinstein.

  • The Fastest Federal Trial Courts: A Look At Virginia, Florida

    Author Photo

    The Eastern District of Virginia rocket docket and the Northern District of Florida were last year’s fastest civil trial courts in the nation, and interviews with two of their judges reveal they have some of the same practices to keep litigation moving efficiently, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • Tips For Evaluating Machine Learning For Contracts Review

    Author Photo

    Law firms considering machine learning and natural language processing to aid in contract reviews should keep several best practices in mind when procuring and deploying this nascent technology, starting with identifying their organization's needs and key requirements, says Ned Gannon at eBrevia.

  • Courts Must Tackle Lack Of Diversity In Class Counsel

    Author Photo

    When federal courts appoint lead lawyers in federal class actions, the counsel chosen are almost always white and male — but if courts adopt a broader view of what kind of experience is relevant for class counsel appointments, the class action bar can be diversified, says Alissa Del Riego at Podhurst Orseck.

  • What The Latest Calif. COVID Standards Mean For Employers

    Author Photo

    While many of the recent changes to the California Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board's COVID-19 emergency temporary standards are minor, they can significantly affect employers' day-to-day operations, including protocols for testing, masks and more, says Jared Speier at Stradling Yocca.