More Employment Coverage

  • May 07, 2021

    Fed. Circ. Says 'Vexatious' Litigant Can't Sue Raytheon, Intel

    A California federal judge rightly found that a former Raytheon engineer's litigation history with the defense contractor and Intel justifies labeling him a "vexatious litigant" and making him pay a $25,000 security bond to sue them again, the Federal Circuit said Friday.

  • May 07, 2021

    Texas Justices Ax Negligence Suit Against Construction Co.

    Reversing an en banc Dallas appeals court, the Texas Supreme Court on Friday held that general contractor JLB Builders LLC had no control over the work of an injured subcontractor and could not be sued for his on-the-job injuries.

  • May 07, 2021

    Legal Industry Continues Gradual Recovery, Adds 3,800 Jobs

    The legal industry added 3,800 jobs in April, continuing a mostly consistent recovery in employment 12 months after the initial shock of the COVID-19 pandemic last spring, according to preliminary seasonally adjusted figures released by the U.S. Department of Labor on Friday.

  • May 06, 2021

    Ex-Princess Cruise Worker Fights Arbitration In Injury Case

    A former Princess Cruise Lines crew member seeking compensation for a permanent injury has told a California federal court that his claim doesn't belong in arbitration in Bermuda, where the company is incorporated, saying the cruise line effectively waived its right to enforce the terms of the employment agreement's arbitration clause.

  • May 06, 2021

    Wawa Can't Close Out Financial Institutions' Data Breach Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge ruled Thursday that Wawa will have to face some claims leveled by financial institutions over a data breach at the convenience store chain, in part because the institutions presented the "stronger argument" that Wawa has a legal duty to protect their private information.

  • May 06, 2021

    Recruitment Firm Says Ex-Worker Raiding Staff, Clients

    A Georgia professional recruitment firm said Tuesday that a former employee had raided its staff and clients in starting his own business, asking a state judge to stop him from making further offers to workers and clients.

  • May 06, 2021

    Ill. Waste Co. Says Ex-Worker Must Arbitrate Retaliation Claim

    An Illinois wastewater processing contractor has asked a state court judge to send to arbitration a former Chicago plant operator's lawsuit claiming the company fired him in retaliation for blowing the whistle on its alleged wastewater mishandling.

  • May 06, 2021

    Cybersecurity Firm Says Rival Is Raiding Workers, Information

    A cybersecurity firm is asking a Georgia federal judge to stop a rival from raiding its employees in what it calls an attempt to steal trade secrets and customers, and to force a former worker to delete any information he took with him to the new job.

  • May 06, 2021

    Adviser May Turn Over WhatsApp Texts In $2.8M Fraud Fight

    An investment adviser may have to turn over WhatsApp messages as part of his former employer's $2.8 million fraud lawsuit after the company complained to a London judge on Thursday that a trove of texts had been destroyed.

  • May 05, 2021

    Calif. High Court Weighs Medical Peer Review Free Speech

    Some California Supreme Court justices appeared skeptical Wednesday when the St. Joseph Health System argued that the medical disciplinary peer-review process is protected by a statute that aims to quickly end lawsuits attacking free speech, with several expressing concern it could have far-reaching consequences.

  • May 05, 2021

    DOJ Says Antitrust Rules Are No Different For Employers

    The U.S. Department of Justice is trying to fend off a bid to dismiss its first criminal case targeting agreements among competitors to not solicit employees, telling a Texas federal court the antitrust laws treat labor markets the same way they do other types of markets.

  • May 05, 2021

    Teen Soccer Phenom Sues League Over 'Unlawful' Age Limit

    A 15-year-old soccer "prodigy" says the National Women's Soccer League's player age limit violates antitrust laws against group boycotts, filing a suit Tuesday in Oregon federal court that asks a judge to force the league to let under-18s play in the 2021 season.

  • May 05, 2021

    Even With Tweak, Workers Fight $12M Wawa Data Breach Deal

    Despite a clarification that a $12 million settlement over a Wawa data breach doesn't release the chain from employees' personal information theft claims, the workers' attorney told a Pennsylvania federal court Wednesday he still hoped to keep his clients out of the deal entirely.

  • May 05, 2021

    Software Exec Tells Ga. Panel $5.4M Payout Is Correct

    The founder and one-time CEO of a software company told the Georgia Court of Appeals Wednesday he earned $5.4 million in compensation and a Tesla under unambiguous and specific language in his employment agreement.

  • May 05, 2021

    Ex-Oil Execs Fight To Get Fraud Claims Out Of England

    Two former executives of crude oil company Arcadia Group told a London appeals court on Wednesday that the terms of their employment block the company from bringing a $339 million conspiracy and fraud suit against them in England.

  • May 04, 2021

    Electric Car Co. Loses Privilege Over Docs On Atty's Firing

    A California federal judge ruled Monday that Faraday Future waived attorney-client privilege on documents surrounding its employment agreement with a former Mayer Brown LLP partner accusing the electric car startup of tricking him into accepting an in-house job, as well as documents connected to his termination.

  • May 04, 2021

    Texas Mutual Wants End To La. Workers' Comp Payment Suit

    Texas Mutual Insurance Co. wants a state appeals court to find that it is not required to reimburse a construction company for workers' compensation benefit payments made to an out-of-state employee, arguing that the trial court's ruling to the contrary would lead to "absurd results."

  • May 04, 2021

    Ex-AT&T Workers Get Second Stab At Foreign Trade Benefits

    The U.S. Department of Labor must reconsider a decision denying former AT&T employees access to a program for American workers replaced by foreign labor, after the U.S. Court of International Trade found Tuesday that the department had failed to consider evidence of outsourcing.

  • May 04, 2021

    Ind. Agency Says State Will Tax Unemployment Compensation

    Indiana will not conform to the federal tax code provision offering a tax exclusion for unemployment compensation, the state Department of Revenue said in guidance about federal tax code changes enacted under legislation providing relief for the coronavirus pandemic.

  • May 04, 2021

    Tai Sees North American Trade Deal As Base For New Policies

    U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai touted the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement's strengthened labor and environmental rules on Tuesday, but said that the deal should serve as a starting point for future accords to address shortfalls.

  • May 04, 2021

    Ga. Bar Says No Basis For MAGA Atty Wood's Discipline Fight

    Georgia's attorney disciplinary board is asking a federal judge to dismiss an attempt by Atlanta attorney L. Lin Wood to shake its request he undergo a mental health evaluation, saying a federal court shouldn't intervene in an attorney conduct matter.

  • May 04, 2021

    Celonis Appoints Netcracker Tech Veteran As Its 1st CLO

    Data mining startup Celonis said Tuesday that it had hired a former Netcracker Technology chief legal officer and chief compliance officer as its first chief legal officer.

  • May 03, 2021

    Florida Gov. Signs Bill Banning Vaccine Passports

    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a bill Monday that bans so-called COVID-19 vaccine passports, enshrining into law what he'd previously enacted through an April executive order, according to a release from his office.

  • May 03, 2021

    IRS Seeks Comments On Paid Leave, Exchange, Tips Forms

    The IRS requested comments Monday on the information collection burden posed by forms for reporting property exchanges and tips and receipts, and those used to claim credits for paid family and medical leave or oil and gas production.

  • April 30, 2021

    PE Firms Want Out Of Pot RICO Suit Against Harvest, Verano

    A pair of Canadian private equity firms named in a man's sprawling racketeering suit alleging cannabis companies Verano Holdings LLC and Harvest Health & Recreation Inc. were responsible for his arrest have asked a federal judge in Colorado to dismiss the case or put it on hold so it can be handled via arbitration.

Expert Analysis

  • The Biden Administration Is Sharpening The TSCA's Sword

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    The Trump administration implemented the 2016 amendments to the Toxic Substances Control Act in a way that critics felt benefited chemical companies, but the Biden administration can be expected to use the amendments to broaden risk reviews and impose new requirements on the regulated community, say attorneys at Kilpatrick.

  • 4 Trends In Discoverability Of Litigation Funding Documents

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    Recent rulings shed light on how courts and international arbitration tribunals decide if litigation funding materials are discoverable and reaffirm best practices that attorneys should follow when communicating with funders, say Justin Maleson at Longford Capital and Michele Slachetka and Christian Plummer at Jenner & Block.

  • Expect Increasing Scrutiny Of Wage-Fixing, No-Poach Deals

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    Employers can expect more actions against wage-fixing or no-poach agreements as the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division cracks down on labor market collusion, so companies should consider tailoring these agreements on their scope, duration and definition of nonsolicitation, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

  • Bio-Rad Ruling Highlights IP Assignment Clause Limits

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    The Federal Circuit's recent holding in Bio-Rad v. International Trade Commission, that an assignment clause wasn’t enough to claim patent ownership where the conception date followed former inventors’ employment, shows companies and workers the importance of specificity in drafting contractual limitations, say Bryan Vogel and Derrick Carman at Robins Kaplan.

  • Cannabis Legalization's Effects On Insurance Industry

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    Resolution of the legal uncertainty presented by the dueling federal and state approaches to cannabis will pave the way for legal cannabis businesses to access the insurance protections the industry needs for everything from workers' compensation to auto insurance to general liability, says Christy Thiems at the American Property Casualty Insurance Association.

  • 7 Lessons For Young Lawyers Starting Their Careers

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    This year's law graduates and other young attorneys must recognize that the practice of law tests and rewards different skills and characteristics than law school, and that what makes a lawyer valuable changes over time, says Vernon Winters, retired partner at Sidley.

  • Justices Should Clarify Securities Fraud Loss Causation

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    At its May conference, the U.S. Supreme Court should agree to review BofI Securities Litigation, to clear up a circuit split on how to assess loss causation in securities fraud cases, as shareholder class actions increasingly focus on external events that led to a stock drop, says Lyle Roberts at Shearman & Sterling.

  • How Gov't FCPA Hiring Practices Theory May Pan Out In Court

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    In recent settlements with banks, U.S. authorities have taken the position that providing a job or even an unpaid internship to relatives or friends of foreign officials is a violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, but it is worth assessing how this theory would fare in individual prosecutions, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • The Pandemic's Bright Spots For Lawyers Who Are Parents

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    The COVID-19 crisis has allowed lawyers to hone remote advocacy strategies and effectively represent clients with minimal travel — abilities that have benefited working parents and should be utilized long after the pandemic is over, says Chelsea Loughran at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Revise Mansfield Diversity Mandates To Also Benefit Veterans

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    The well-intentioned efforts and salutary purposes of the legal industry's Mansfield Rule diversity metric are tainted by the Diversity Lab initiative's omission of veterans, who are underrepresented at large law firms and entitled to advantageous treatment based on more than 200 years of public policy, says Robert Redmond at McGuireWoods.

  • Leverage The National Interest Waiver To Help US Economy

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    Understanding the intricacies and complexities of the national interest waiver, and positioning this immigration benefit to foreign nationals who are likely to create jobs for U.S. workers in health care, technology and other fields, are integral to post-pandemic economic recovery, says Miatrai Brown at Hayman Woodward.

  • Lessons From Key Expert Testimony In Chauvin Trial

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    During the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, pulmonologist Martin Tobin gave a gripping account of the cause of George Floyd’s death, engaging jurors in creative ways and bringing five important lessons for lawyers preparing expert witnesses, say Harlan Prater and Logan Matthews at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • Why The Future Law Firm Model Is Industry-Based Offerings

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    Multidisciplinary, industry-based groups at law firms allow for more holistic legal advice, lead to sustainable client relationships, and are likely to replace practice group monoliths at many firms, say Jennifer Simpson Carr at Furia Rubel, Timothy Corcoran at Corcoran Consulting and Mike Mellor at Pryor Cashman.