California

  • December 01, 2022

    'The Morning Show' Asks 9th Circ. To Undo Chubb's Virus Win

    The production company behind Apple TV+'s "The Morning Show" asked the Ninth Circuit to reverse a Chubb unit's win in a $44 million coverage dispute over pandemic-related losses, saying a lower court erroneously found that the insurer did not owe coverage for its production delays amid the pandemic.

  • December 01, 2022

    Insurer Denied Win In HOA Retention Dispute

    A homeowners association doesn't have to pay a $150,000 retention after a Liberty Mutual unit agreed to defend it for two underlying claims, a California federal court ruled, finding the association's policy is ambiguous whether the retention applied after the unit accepted the association's tender of defense.

  • December 01, 2022

    Michigan Man Sues LA Pot Regulators Over Residency Rule

    A Michigan resident who is challenging New York's cannabis retail license scheme as unconstitutional has filed a new federal lawsuit in Los Angeles, accusing city marijuana regulators of similar discrimination for favoring California residents.

  • November 30, 2022

    'No Question' Weinstein 'Was A Predator,' Prosecutor Says

    A prosecutor started her closing argument Wednesday by encouraging a California jury considering sex crimes charges against Harvey Weinstein to pay attention to the similar stories of his eight accusers, including how he often used the promise of a business meeting in a hotel room to "disguise his evil intent."

  • November 30, 2022

    Fired CPUC Exec Seeks $4.8M As Whistleblower Trial Wraps

    A lawyer for Alice Stebbins said during closing arguments in her whistleblower trial Wednesday that the fired California Public Utilities Commission executive director should be awarded up to $4.8 million for calling out the regulators' "fiscal and operational dysfunction," while counsel for the agency called her whistleblowing claim "manufactured."

  • November 30, 2022

    IP Suit Accuses Paris Hilton Of Posting Photog's Work

    Hotel heiress Paris Hilton has been cropping, editing and posting pictures of herself on Instagram that were meant to be used only for the promotion of her Electrify perfume and has refused to pay the photographer's licensing fee, according to a lawsuit filed in California federal court Wednesday.

  • November 30, 2022

    Ex-NHL Player, American Airlines Resolve Flight Ejection Suit

    Former NHL player Jean-Francois Jomphe and American Airlines have resolved their dispute and agreed to dismiss the ex-player's lawsuit that accused the airline of unfairly ejecting him from a plane after a flight attendant hit him, according to a filing in California federal court.

  • November 30, 2022

    Ex-Dodger Puig Backs Out Of Plea Deal, Citing New Evidence

    Former Los Angeles Dodgers star Yasiel Puig will rescind his agreement to plead guilty to lying to investigators about bets placed through an illicit sports gambling operation and will change his plea to not guilty, his attorney announced Wednesday afternoon, citing "significant new evidence."

  • November 30, 2022

    British Formula One Racing Team Gets $32M Award Confirmed

    A California federal judge has confirmed an approximately $32 million arbitration award for a decades-old British Formula One racing team and constructor in a dispute over sponsorship deals with a media company, finding that confirmation of the award was never opposed.

  • November 30, 2022

    San Francisco Hedge Fund Hires Veteran Finance Atty As CCO

    A former chief compliance officer for investment adviser Harvest Capital Strategies LLC has joined Indaba Capital Management LP as its new head of compliance.

  • November 30, 2022

    9th Circ. Tells Uber Objectors Settlement Isn't A Coupon Deal

    The Ninth Circuit on Wednesday affirmed Uber Technologies Inc.'s $32.5 million deal and class counsel's $5.7 million fee award in litigation over the ride-hailing service's deceptive "safe rides" fee, rejecting objectors' arguments that the settlement amounts to a coupon deal with "de minimis" individual payouts.

  • November 23, 2022

    Ex-MLB All-Star Puig Delays Plea Hearing Over Illicit Gambling

    A California federal judge agreed Wednesday to briefly continue the hearing at which former MLB outfielder Yasiel Puig was expected to admit to lying to federal agents about wagers placed through an illegal gambling outfit, after his attorney sought time to review evidence she said may support an entrapment defense. 

  • November 30, 2022

    Immig. Board Told To Consider Mom's Missed Hearing Excuse

    The Board of Immigration Appeals must consider whether an asylum-seeker can be excused for missing an immigration hearing after her autistic children knocked over the papers containing the hearing date, a split Ninth Circuit ordered on Wednesday.

  • November 30, 2022

    9th Circ. Rehearing To Explore 1980 Alaska Conservation Law

    The Ninth Circuit has indicated that the full bench plans to delve into the Carter-era Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act as it mulls the legality of a proposed land swap between the federal government and a Native Alaskan village.

  • November 30, 2022

    Real Estate Rumors: LA Family Housing, AECOM, Azoffs

    LA Family Housing is reportedly hoping to convert a former California motel into apartments, AECOM is reportedly downsizing at 100 Park Ave. in New York, and Irving and Sheli Azoff have reportedly sold a Los Angeles mansion for $25 million.

  • November 30, 2022

    Class Certified In J&J 'Oil-Free' Moisturizer False Ad Suit

    A California federal judge on Wednesday granted class certification to a group of buyers who alleged Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc.'s moisturizers falsely advertise that they are oil-free, saying the lead plaintiff has shown common questions are at the root of the dispute.

  • November 30, 2022

    Roche Escapes Ex-Service Member's Anti-Malarial Drug Suit

    A California federal judge has thrown out a proposed class action from a former U.S. military service member alleging F. Hoffmann-La Roche Inc. and its affiliates failed to warn the U.S. government that their anti-malarial drug could have permanent psychiatric side effects, finding that his claims are blocked by the laws of New Jersey, where Roche was based when he was prescribed the drug.

  • November 30, 2022

    Fraud Didn't Spur $8.7M Award In Film Fight, Court Told

    A California federal judge should enforce an $8.7 million arbitration award against the son of a prominent Mexican filmmaker, his siblings say, arguing their brother can't prove they committed fraud before being awarded the hefty sum in a decadeslong family dispute over their father's film library.

  • November 30, 2022

    NCAA Accused Of Wage Fixing By 'Volunteer' Coaches

    The National Collegiate Athletic Association was hit with a proposed antitrust class action on Tuesday alleging that the organization has conspired with member schools to illegally fix the number of assistant coaches Division I baseball teams may employ, thus setting compensation of additional "volunteer" coaches at zero.

  • November 30, 2022

    Exotic Dancers Get Final OK To $6.5M Wage Suit Deal

    A California federal judge gave her final stamp of approval to a $6.5 million settlement to claims that a group of nightclubs misclassified exotic dancers as independent contractors and improperly took portions of their tips.

  • November 30, 2022

    GOP Sens. Question Judge Picks On Crime, 2nd Amendment

    Republican senators pressed district court nominees on past decisions involving bail and Second Amendment cases during a Senate Judiciary Committee nominations hearing Wednesday.

  • November 30, 2022

    Insurer Wants Out Of Trucking Co. Employees' Assault Suit

    A Progressive unit told a California federal court that an assault and battery exclusion in the policy it provided to a trucking company revokes its defense obligations for the company in an underlying suit in which its employees are accused of assaulting two people at a rest stop.

  • November 30, 2022

    Lawyer In ADA Suits Admits Hiding $1M In Settlement Income

    A Sacramento attorney who filed thousands of lawsuits against California businesses for violating construction standards meant to protect people with disabilities admitted to hiding over $1 million in settlement income from the IRS and agreed to serve home confinement, the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • November 29, 2022

    TikTok Secretly Collects 'Massive Amounts' Of Data, Suit Says

    TikTok Inc. has secretly amassed "massive amounts" of invasive information on millions of users via its in-app browser, tracking users' activities on third-party websites in a violation of wiretap and consumer protection laws, according to a proposed class action filed in California federal court.

  • November 29, 2022

    Former Del. Justices Back The Gap In 9th Circ. Investor Case

    Two former chief justices of the Delaware Supreme Court are among those calling on the full bench of the Ninth Circuit to uphold the dismissal of a shareholder derivative lawsuit brought against retailer The Gap, saying the suit properly belongs in Delaware by way of a forum selection clause.

Expert Analysis

  • Perspectives

    How Civilian Attorneys Can Help Veterans

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    With legal aid topping the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' annual list of unmet needs of veterans facing housing insecurity, nonmilitary volunteer attorneys can provide some of the most effective legal services to military and veteran clients, say Anna Richardson at Veterans Legal Services and Nicholas Hasenfus at Holland & Knight.

  • Why Companies Lose In Gig Worker Class Cert. Cases

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    The recent class certification of gig workers in Roman v. Jan-Pro Franchising in California and Bedoya v. American Eagle Express in New Jersey shows that companies who rely on uniform contracts and policies with independent contractors expose themselves to liability in a judicial climate that increasingly favors workers, say Joan Fife and Kevin Simpson at Winston & Strawn.

  • Opportunities, Hurdles In Cannabis Immersive Entertainment

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    The evolution of cannabis consumption laws, paired with the growing demand for immersive and out-of-home entertainment, creates unique opportunities that may help companies survive price and market fluctuations — if they can navigate a complex maze of state laws and regulations, say Bryan Bergman and Wendy Heimann-Nunes at Nolan Heimann.

  • Antitrust Considerations From The PGA Tour-LIV Golf Battle

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    How the battle between the PGA tour and LIV Golf plays out may shape the U.S. antitrust environment for years to come, and considerations include LIV's growing success, which could undercut its claims of unfair competition, says Craig Seebald at V&E.

  • What Retailers Should Know Ahead Of Calif. 'Pink Tax' Law

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    A new law in California that will prohibit higher prices for products marketed to a particular gender — and that particularly takes aim at the so-called pink tax on items marketed to women — goes into effect on Jan. 1, and retailers should be aware of its harsh penalties, the types of legal action it provides for, and more, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Recent Fed. Circ. Patent Eligibility Rulings Offer Drafting Tips

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    A trio of recent owner-favorable patent decisions in the Federal Circuit provide pointers on drafting complaints with sufficient eligibility facts to survive a motion to dismiss, including when to write an analysis of sufficient eligibility, say Kevin Schubert and Scott Hejny at McKool Smith.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned That Culture Shapes Law

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    U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff of the Southern District of New York considers how a class with Jerry Cohen at Harvard Law helped him understand culture and history’s influence on jurisprudence, and how even seemingly settled law can evolve — all while espousing a more humanistic approach to teaching that restored Judge Rakoff's pride in being a lawyer.

  • California Case Offers New Take on Liquidated Damages

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    The California Court of Appeal's recent decision in Gormley v. Gonzalez appears to break from well-established precedent that liquidated damages provisions in settlement agreements are unenforceable penalties — and provides hints for practitioners on crafting more robust liquidated damages clauses going forward, say Alexander Safyan and Jon-Jamison Hill at Michelman & Robinson.

  • Web IP Ruling Illustrates Ways To Clear Hurdles To Eligibility

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    The Federal Circuit's reasoning in the recent Cooperative Entertainment v. Kollective Technology decision to reverse a district court's software arts patent ruling offers several guideposts for surviving challenges to eligibility, including the accurate identification and description of the relevant prior art in a specification, say Eric Sophir and Evan Glass of Foley & Lardner.

  • Addressing Potential Perils In Algorithmic Health Tech

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    In light of recent legislative and executive enforcement activity in California targeting algorithmic technology in health care, health providers should address bias and other downstream impacts of this technology in order to avoid liability, say Gayland Hethcoat and Candace Sandoval at ArentFox Schiff.

  • 9 Legal Ethics Considerations In Natural Disaster Preparation

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    Since natural disasters like Hurricane Ian do not relieve lawyers of their ethical obligations to clients, law firms should focus their preparedness efforts on specific areas crucial to continuity of representation and ethics compliance, like business and communications contingency planning, record redundancy and more, says Mark Hinderks at Stinson.

  • Ad Industry Notes From Kardashian's SEC Crypto Case

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    Kim Kardashian’s recent $1.26 million settlement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over her social media promotion of the EMAX token provides important lessons for advertisers on how to properly disclose payment for sponsored posts, says Hannah Taylor at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • What To Know About New Wave Of Calif. Employment Laws

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    Attorneys at Reed Smith share insights on employment and benefits laws recently enacted in California that are certain to affect employers in the year ahead — including new bereavement and medical leave requirements, expanded reproductive health care protections, a minimum wage increase, and updated pay transparency rules.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Put Law Into Practice

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    Massachusetts U.S. Attorney Rachael Rollins looks back at how Judge Charles Spurlock's trial advocacy class at Northeastern University School of Law challenged her to apply what she had already learned about civil and criminal procedure, evidence and criminal law to solving real-world problems.

  • Fed. Circ. In October: Patent Venue's Remote Work Questions

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    Amid increased remote employment, the Federal Circuit's recent refusal to review the Monolithic Power Systems venue case on mandamus means the role of employees in patent venue analysis will remain uncertain until the issue is resolved on appeal from a final judgment, says Paul Stewart at Knobbe Martens.

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