Class Action

  • January 26, 2022

    Northrop's Pension Denials Sounded Like Threats, Judge Told

    Former TRW Inc. employees testified in a California federal bench trial over Employee Retirement Income Security Act class claims Wednesday that TRW's successor Northrop Grumman denied them pension benefits despite years of work, with one claiming Northrop's response "almost sounded like I was going to have to start paying them money."

  • January 26, 2022

    IRS Agents Can't Escape Meatpackers' Immigration Raid Suit

    A Tennessee federal judge denied dismissal motions Wednesday from some Internal Revenue Service agents in a suit over an immigration raid on a meatpacking plant, ruling that the claims are not time-barred because the agency worked to hide the agents' identities and prevented the plaintiffs from naming them within the initial one-year time frame.

  • January 26, 2022

    Attys Get $2.7M Of $12M Wells Fargo Mortgage Glitch Deal

    Attorneys representing Wells Fargo home loan customers will receive a $2.7 million fee for their work on a class action over technical glitches affecting the bank's automated mortgage loan modification tools.

  • January 26, 2022

    Illinois Man Accuses Online Tribal Lenders of Predatory Loans

    An Illinois debtor has filed a proposed class action against a group of online tribal lending companies for allegedly issuing illegal high-interest loans, adding to a trend of similar complaints across the country that accuse unscrupulous lenders of using tribes as a mere front to gain immunity from prosecution.

  • January 26, 2022

    Democrats Plan Swift Confirmation Of Breyer Successor

    The U.S. Senate's Democratic leaders pledged Wednesday to move swiftly to confirm a successor for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, who is expected to formally announce his retirement Thursday.

  • January 26, 2022

    UHS Investors Get $2.5M Fees After 'Audacious' $5.7M Bid

    Shareholders who accused Universal Health Services Inc. of misleading them about an overbilling scheme and agreed to a settlement secured a $2.5 million attorney fee award on Wednesday, less than half of the $5.7 million request called "audacious" by the Fortune 500 company.

  • January 26, 2022

    Del. Court Tosses Challenge To $13B Noble-Chevron Merger

    A Delaware court on Wednesday tossed out a lawsuit challenging Noble Energy Corp.'s $13 billion merger with Chevron Corp. in 2020, dismissing arguments from investors that they should have been informed about a potential partial sale offer made years earlier.

  • January 26, 2022

    No Antitrust Immunity For Mushroom Co-Op In Winn-Dixie Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge handed Winn-Dixie Stores a win on Wednesday, finding that even though a mushroom farm cooperative changed its name, the group hasn't done enough to qualify for antitrust immunity in the supermarket company's price-fixing suit.

  • January 26, 2022

    US Steel Disputes Enviro Groups' Standing In Sulfur Suit

    U.S. Steel Corp. contended that its Pittsburgh-area facilities’ neighbors didn't have standing to sue over alleged environmental violations following a 2018 fire that knocked out a plant's pollution controls for months, arguing to a federal judge that the offending sulfur and soot could have come from other sources.

  • January 26, 2022

    Shkreli Ruling Pokes Holes In Keurig Defense, Rivals Say

    Keurig's coffee competitors have told a New York federal judge that Martin Shkreli's recent $64.6 million loss in a pharmaceutical antitrust case underscores why Keurig should face liability for monopoly conduct.

  • January 26, 2022

    Meet The Possible Nominees For Justice Breyer's Seat

    President Joe Biden has promised to nominate the first-ever Black woman to the nation's highest court. Here we look at the contenders for Justice Stephen Breyer's seat, including one notable front-runner.

  • January 26, 2022

    Let Plaintiffs Outside Pa. Into FedEx Wage Suit, 3rd Circ. Told

    Former FedEx security specialists urged the Third Circuit to undo a Pennsylvania federal court's exclusion of claims by out-of-state plaintiffs in a collective wage action alleging overtime pay violations, arguing Wednesday that the ruling undermines the streamlined litigation mechanism of federal labor law.

  • January 26, 2022

    9th Circ. Won't Rehear Dealers' German Car Antitrust MDL

    The Ninth Circuit won't review a three-judge panel's October decision to quash allegations from U.S. car dealerships claiming German auto manufacturers conspired to control diesel emissions system specifications and unreasonably restrain trade in violation of U.S. antitrust law.

  • January 26, 2022

    Colo. Marijuana Security Workers End Yearslong OT Dispute

    Helix TCS security guards agreed Wednesday to dismiss their lawsuit in Colorado federal court alleging the marijuana security firm failed to pay them overtime, ending the 5-year-old suit that took a trip to the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • January 26, 2022

    'Just Do Your Job': Justice Breyer's Legacy Of Pragmatism

    With the coming retirement of Justice Stephen Breyer, the U.S. Supreme Court loses not only a core member of its liberal bloc, but also a judicial thinker who cares deeply about making the law work on a practical level, those who worked with him said.

  • January 26, 2022

    Ga. Health Care System Can't Shake $4.6M ERISA Class Action

    A Georgia health care system has lost its bid to dismiss a proposed class action alleging it wasted about $4.6 million in employees' retirement savings by mismanaging their investments, a day after the U.S. Supreme Court issued an opinion in a similar case.

  • January 26, 2022

    Girardi Used Client Cash On Diamonds For Wife, Trustee Says

    Reality television star Erika Girardi must surrender $750,000 diamond earrings that her husband, former trial attorney Thomas V. Girardi, bought with money he embezzled from his injured clients, a bankruptcy trustee told a Los Angeles judge this week.

  • January 26, 2022

    Fla. Woman Says Loan Servicer Chasing Discharged Debt

    Mortgage lender and servicer Newrez LLC is facing a proposed class action in Florida federal court by a woman who claims the company wrecked her credit rating while trying to collect on a mortgage that had been discharged in bankruptcy more than a decade ago.

  • January 26, 2022

    Insurer Says Dairy Isn't Covered In Biometric Privacy Suit

    A Nationwide unit said it has no duty to defend or indemnify Oberweis Dairy in a proposed class action claiming the company violated employees' biometric data rights, saying coverage does not exist under its commercial general liability policy, according to a complaint in Illinois state court.

  • January 26, 2022

    5 Breyer Opinions You Need To Know

    Justice Stephen Breyer, who was confirmed Wednesday to be stepping down from the court after 27 years, was a pragmatist who thought about the real-world implications of the high court’s decisions. Here, Law360 looks at some of the cases that epitomize his career.

  • January 26, 2022

    Party City Flouted NY Weekly Pay Rules, Ex-Worker Says

    A former Party City employee hit the company with a proposed class action Tuesday alleging he and other manual laborers in New York were not paid weekly in violation of state law.

  • January 26, 2022

    Justice Breyer To Retire From High Court

    Justice Stephen Breyer, one of the longest-serving liberal members of the U.S. Supreme Court, will resign his post after more than 27 years on the bench.

  • January 25, 2022

    Google Must Face Trimmed Ariz. Suit Over Location Tracking

    An Arizona state judge has refused to throw out the Arizona attorney general's suit against Google over allegedly misleading location tracking, although he did trim the state's claim centering on selling advertisement spots to third parties, according to a decision docketed Tuesday.

  • January 25, 2022

    'Frankly Stunning': Distributors Pan DEA Vet At Opioid Trial

    Drug distributors sought Tuesday to torpedo some of the most important testimony so far in Washington state's opioid trial, asserting that a former U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration official "stunningly" impugned their conduct based on her personal views, not actual regulatory violations.

  • January 25, 2022

    NY Court Reporters Challenge Courthouse Vax Mandate

    The New York State Unified Court System "disparaged and rejected" the religious beliefs of court employees when it denied their exemption requests from the system's COVID-19 vaccination requirement, a group of court reporters alleged Tuesday in a federal lawsuit. 

Expert Analysis

  • A Law Firm Leader's Guide To Seeking Effective Feedback

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    Law firm leaders often claim to have their fingers on the pulse of the people in their firms, but perspectives can be heavily weighted toward certain partners, so leaders should take certain steps to ensure they receive well-rounded feedback that helps them make more informed decisions, says Jennifer Johnson at Calibrate Legal.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Offers Key Antitrust Takeaways On Standing

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    The Second Circuit's recent rejection of standing for antitrust claims against American Express is grounded in principles of proximate causation and suggests that courts will be particularly skeptical of complicated or attenuated theories of antitrust harm, say attorneys at Paul Weiss.

  • What M&A Activity Looks Like Right Now

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    Attorneys at Fried Frank examine the 2021 M&A environment and ensuing litigation trends, including hostile takeover activity focused on pandemic-hit companies, pressure on special purpose acquisition companies to find new targets, and the shift in the government's stance on competition.

  • Consumer Class Action Trends To Watch As 2021 Ends

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    Targeting automated texting campaigns, biometrics, data security and other legal liabilities, class actions in consumer-interfacing industries have risen in 2021 and will likely remain trendy into the new year, say Alexis Buese and Derek Mountford at Gunster.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Whirlpool CLO Talks Structural Improvement

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    As the global understanding of what it means to measurably make a positive societal and environmental impact evolves, creating a solid governance structure, backed up by bold action and increased transparency, will set up companies and their legal teams to remain resilient through economic and societal changes and manage risk, says Ava Harter at Whirlpool.

  • Opinion

    Fla. High Court Is Wrong To Ban CLE Diversity Requirements

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    The Florida Supreme Court is wrong in precluding attorneys from getting any continuing legal education credit for courses that use so-called diversity quotas, as it erroneously assumes existing biases and prejudices in the legal profession will change without proactive steps, says Sidney Kanazawa at ARC LLC.

  • How Market Definition Fueled Antitrust Win For Apple

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    A California federal court's recent decision in Coronavirus Reporter v. Apple to dismiss several app developers' antitrust claims against Apple serves as a reminder that defendants should not hesitate to challenge the sufficiency of an antitrust complaint's market definition allegations, says Julie Webb at Locke Lord.

  • Lawyers Must Prepare For Contract Tech Co. Consolidation

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    The legal industry's continued remote work needs during the pandemic have fueled growth of contract lifecycle management providers, but to continue access to the platforms they have come to rely on, businesses should look out for the CLM mergers that are likely to occur in 2022, says Naseeha Machingal at LegalEase Solutions.

  • Cordova V. Chicago Could Narrow Fulton Creditor Protection

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    The U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Northern District of Illinois in Cordova v. Chicago may partially retract the secured creditor shield of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2020 Chicago v. Fulton decision, as that case only addressed potential automatic stay violations of one section of the Bankruptcy Code, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Disputing Plaintiff Expert Testimony In Product Liability Cases

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    Several recent decisions have shed light on courts' willingness to dismiss a product liability action where the plaintiff lacks sufficiently reliable evidence of general causation, and defense attorneys can use two related scientific concepts to support their arguments for dismissal, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • 4th Circ. Ruling Offers Guidance On Scope Of WARN Act

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    A recent ruling from the Fourth Circuit in Pennington v. Fluor clarified how a company may be liable under the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act, providing key workforce layoff lessons for investors, parent corporations and enterprises that rely on third-party service providers, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • How Firms Can Adapt Amid COVID's Shifting Legal Needs

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    Avi Stadler at Esquire Deposition Solutions discusses the practice areas that are expanding most aggressively during the COVID-19 era of increased litigation and technology needs, and offers recommendations for how law firms can attract and retain the expertise they need to thrive in today's competitive market for legal services.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Synchrony Counsel Talk Role Of Legal Teams

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    Jonathan Mothner and Danielle Do at Synchrony Financial discuss legal departments' essential role in their firms' environmental, social and governance programs, and how legal leaders can leverage their teams and internal relationships to advance ESG efforts.

  • Rebuttal

    Arbitration's Advantages Make It A Superior Solution

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    While a recent Law360 guest article criticized arbitration as an inferior method for resolving disputes, arbitral proceedings can provide significant advantages over litigation — including speed, flexibility and lower costs — to companies, consumers and employees alike, says David Singer at SingerADR Neutral Services.

  • Balance Seems To Elude Justices In Northwestern ERISA Case

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    At recent oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court in Hughes v. Northwestern University, a major sticking point centered on finding a pleading standard for Employee Retirement Income Security Act excessive fee claims that ensures protection for both plans and participants — but it’s unclear where that middle ground might be, says Dawn Murphy-Johnson at Miller & Chevalier.

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