Corporate

  • July 26, 2021

    Where Have All The Associates Gone?

    Nonpartner attorney headcounts declined slightly across the Law360 400 last year amid the pandemic, leaving many law firms scrambling for associate talent that seems to be evaporating even as many firms see an uptick in work.

  • July 26, 2021

    The Law360 400: Tracking The Largest U.S. Law Firms

    As much of the U.S. emerges from the worst of the coronavirus pandemic that upended the world last year, law firms are taking stock of how much their business and their bench strength were affected by the unprecedented pressures of a global health crisis.

  • July 23, 2021

    FTC Given Extra Time To File Amended Facebook Complaint

    A D.C. federal court granted the Federal Trade Commission three additional weeks to file its amended monopoly complaint against Facebook Inc., following an FTC extension bid that was not opposed by the social media giant.

  • July 23, 2021

    Stamps.com Cuts $30M Deal To End Insider Trading Claims

    Stamps.com cut a $30 million deal with investors to settle derivative lawsuits over insider trading claims and allegations the shipping company abused the U.S. Postal Service's postage reselling rules for years, according to court documents filed in Delaware Chancery Court on Friday.

  • July 23, 2021

    IP Hires: Aeglea BioTherapeutics, Copyright Claims Board

    Clinical-stage biotech firm Aeglea BioTherapeutics has brought on Viela Bio's top attorney to serve as its new general counsel, while three attorneys have been tapped to preside over the new Copyright Claims Board. Here are the details on these and other notable hires.

  • July 23, 2021

    Exec. Fired For Posts Equating Mask Reporting To Nazis Sues

    A former director for Massachusetts' Medicaid administration agency launched a state court suit Thursday claiming she was illegally fired for writing Facebook posts comparing the suggestion that people should report others for not wearing masks during the pandemic to the actions of German Nazis.

  • July 23, 2021

    GM, Ex-UAW VP Spar Over Breach Of Duty, Kickbacks Suit

    General Motors LLC and former United Auto Workers Vice President Joseph Ashton sparred Thursday over whether the carmaker can pursue breach of fiduciary duty and fraudulent concealment claims in its New Jersey federal lawsuit alleging Ashton was a "disloyal director" who helped Fiat Chrysler undercut GM during collective bargaining negotiations. 

  • July 23, 2021

    $13.5M Deal Ends Amazon Wage MDL That Went To High Court

    A Kentucky federal judge granted final approval Thursday to a $13.5 million settlement resolving multidistrict claims that over 42,000 Amazon.com warehouse workers weren't compensated for time spent in mandatory security checks, ending an 11-year fight that made its way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • July 23, 2021

    Brand Battles: Warner Bros. Rips 'Golden Ticket' Animal Feed

    In Law360's latest roundup of new actions at the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, Warner Bros. wants to stop dairy giant Land O'Lakes' Purina brand from registering the term "Golden Ticket" as a trademark, citing its "Willy Wonka" films — plus four other new cases you need to know.

  • July 23, 2021

    Full 9th Circ. Won't Rethink Google Securities Suit's Revival

    The Ninth Circuit shot down Alphabet Inc. and Google LLC's bid for an en banc rehearing on Friday, after a panel partially revived a proposed securities class action alleging Google duped investors about a 2018 software bug that exposed half a million users' data.

  • July 23, 2021

    Insurer Fights 5th Circ. Revival Of $6M Phishing Coverage Suit

    An AIG unit told the Fifth Circuit on Friday that real estate software company RealPage isn't entitled to coverage for a $6 million loss in a 2018 phishing scam, saying the software company wasn't holding the money when it was stolen.

  • July 23, 2021

    Tesla Stock Gains Flagged As Missing Point In Chancery Trial

    Testimony on Tesla's "meteoric" stock price increase after its more than $2 billion acquisition of rooftop solar company SolarCity Corp. in 2016 drew an objection Friday in a Delaware Chancery stockholder suit seeking damages from CEO Elon Musk for his allegedly conflicted role.

  • July 23, 2021

    Goldman Sachs Wants Women's Gender Bias Class Undone

    Goldman Sachs urged a Manhattan federal judge to decertify a class of women associates and vice presidents in a decade-old gender bias case, saying its allegedly discriminatory performance review process was decentralized and couldn't glue the class members together.

  • July 23, 2021

    Top 4 Trade Questions Facing Attys: Midyear Report

    As the Biden administration’s honeymoon period wears off, trade attorneys are eagerly awaiting clarity on the government’s plans for China, the World Trade Organization and a simmering crisis at U.S. ports. Here, Law360 takes a look at four critical trade policy fronts that could see the most movement in the back half of 2021.

  • July 23, 2021

    Product Liability Regs, Bills To Watch In The 2nd Half Of 2021

    Under the Biden administration, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is starting to take action on a group of chemicals known as "forever" chemicals found in a broad array of industry and consumer products. In addition, product liability attorneys will be watching whether legislation to remove cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act has legs.

  • July 23, 2021

    Employment Authority: New State Bias Laws & NLRB GC

    Law360 Employment Authority covers the biggest employment cases and trends. Catch up this week with a look at a host of new state discrimination laws attorneys should be aware of, tips for acing depositions in wage and hour cases and how the Senate's confirmation of the new NLRB general counsel signals a major pro-union shift at the agency.

  • July 23, 2021

    Firms Vie For CFIUS Attys As 'Black Box' Panel Extends Reach

    An interagency government committee that conducts national security reviews of foreign investments has played an increasingly active role in recent years, fueling a battle among top Washington, D.C., practices for attorneys versed in working with the panel, which has a reputation for operating in a "black box."

  • July 23, 2021

    GCs, Compliance Chiefs Urge Action On Disability Inclusion

    Top attorneys from The Coca-Cola Co., GlaxoSmithKline LLC, Unilever PLC and other large companies have banded together to call on other general counsel and chief compliance officers to improve the inclusion of those with disabilities in their departments.

  • July 23, 2021

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    After Morgan Stanley's chief legal officer urged firm lawyers to return to the office, his peers at other major banks spoke out about their plans, and LeClairRyan's former general counsel pled guilty to a criminal obstruction charge. These are some of the stories in corporate legal news you may have missed in the past week.

  • July 23, 2021

    Feds Seek Prison For Cop Who Aided EBay Stalking Scheme

    Federal prosecutors on Thursday sought a 2½-year prison sentence for a retired California cop who they say "betrayed" his badge as an eBay security employee when he stalked and terrorized a Massachusetts couple over their blog's critical reporting.

  • July 22, 2021

    Dems Want Social Media Cos. Liable For Vax Misinformation

    Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., introduced a bill Thursday that would revoke the Communications Decency Act's liability shields for social media companies that use algorithms to promote health-related misinformation, an effort to combat false reports about the COVID-19 vaccine.

  • July 22, 2021

    In Kanter, DOJ Would Get An Aggressive Antitrust Enforcer

    President Joe Biden's nomination this week of Jonathan Kanter to lead the U.S. Department of Justice Antitrust Division put to rest any lingering doubts about just how aggressively his administration will ramp up antitrust enforcement and crack down on corporate concentration.

  • July 22, 2021

    Coinbase Slapped With Securities Suit Over Public Debut

    Coinbase and its top brass were hit with a proposed securities class action Thursday over the cryptocurrency platform's move to go public, with one shareholder claiming that Coinbase's offering materials were false and misleading and that its stock price has plummeted since its April debut.

  • July 22, 2021

    Gilead Must Foot $1.8M Bill For 'Egregious' Litigation Conduct

    The Delaware chancellor on Thursday chastised Gilead Sciences Inc. for "glaringly egregious" litigation conduct, ordering the company to pay nearly $1.76 million in attorney fees for shareholders who battled Gilead's "overly aggressive" efforts to shut down investigations into its potential malfeasance regarding its AIDS drug development.

  • July 22, 2021

    Hyundai Sanctioned For 'Shocking' Fraud Suit Spoliation

    A Florida magistrate judge hit Hyundai Motor America Corp. with spoliation sanctions Thursday for failing to preserve hundreds of engines that would've been crucial evidence in the automaker's fraud suit accusing dealerships of deliberately damaging engines to collect on warranty payments, calling the company's spoliation "frankly shocking."

Expert Analysis

  • Data Trends To Watch In M&A And Competition Investigations

    Author Photo

    With an uptick in mergers and acquisitions and dramatic shifts in the data landscape, practitioners need to understand the myriad emerging trends affecting regulatory oversight, second requests, merger clearance and competition investigations, and avoid data-related problems that might derail deals, say Andrea Levine and Tim Anderson at FTI Consulting.

  • Rebuttal

    FCA Relator Pursuit Of DOJ's Declined Cases Is Vital

    Author Photo

    While a recent Law360 guest article suggests that the U.S. Department of Justice consider dismissing all False Claims Act cases it declines, that policy would undermine the FCA's broad remedial purpose of empowering private citizens to combat fraud against the government, say Jacklyn DeMar at Taxpayers Against Fraud Education Fund and Renée Brooker at Tycko & Zavareei.

  • How Wyoming Is Leading On Cryptocurrency

    Author Photo

    This month, Wyoming became the first state to classify decentralized autonomous organizations as a new form of LLC, which could bring new liability principles and chip away at Delaware's dominance as the corporate capital of the U.S., says Emily DiBenedetto at Shaw Keller.

  • Recent SPAC Settlement Signals SEC Enforcement Wave

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recent settlement with special purpose acquisition company Stable Road — and its sponsor, CEO and proposed merger target — over false representations to investors illustrates the agency's heightened focus on policing SPAC transactions and should prompt participants to ensure adequate due diligence, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • 5 Questions On Standing In The Wake Of TransUnion

    Author Photo

    While the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in TransUnion v. Ramirez provided some clarity on the contours of Article III standing, it opens the door to several potential shifts in where and how consumer class actions will be litigated, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Revamping Law Firm Marketing Lists — With Partner Buy-In

    Author Photo

    Jackson Lewis’ Paige Bowser shares lessons from the firm's recent overhaul of an outdated email marketing database, including tips for getting partners on board, ensuring compliance with privacy laws and augmenting outreach strategies.

  • Gov't Contractor Input Vital After Biden Cybersecurity Order

    Author Photo

    The Office of Management and Budget's upcoming recommendations for improving U.S. cybersecurity defenses, following President Joe Biden's recent executive order, could create burdensome obligations for government contractors, so it's important for the government to actively engage with the industry during the rulemaking process, say executives at Leidos.

  • TransUnion Ruling Limits Standing But Could Hurt Defendants

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in TransUnion v. Ramirez could represent a pyrrhic victory for the defense bar by further shifting class standing from a motion-to-dismiss argument to one that is not ripe until summary judgment, which could present a multibillion-dollar problem for defendants in data privacy litigation, say David Saunders and Peter Scheyer at McDermott.

  • The Murky World Of Legal Rankings Gets Some Clarity In NJ

    Author Photo

    New Jersey's new, stringent approach to legal rankings will make accolade advertising more transparent, benefiting both attorneys and clients and offering legal marketers a new set of best practices amid evolving standards, say Penny Paul at Lowenstein Sandler and Susan Peters at Greybridge.

  • Awaiting High Court Answer On Post-Cyan Discovery Issue

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court’s forthcoming decision in Pivotal Software v. Tran next term may clarify a question begat by the court’s 2018 Cyan decision — whether the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act’s automatic discovery stay provision applies in state courts — and thereby lessen the burden on parties litigating amid the ambiguity, says Liz Cassady at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: Cigna Counsel Talks Employee Wellness

    Author Photo

    Building employee well-being into corporate environmental, social and governance priorities required our legal team to focus more closely on cross-functional collaboration within the company and increased communication with our board of directors and shareholders, says Julia Brncic at Cigna.

  • Hybrid Work Models Are Key To Gender Parity In Law Firms

    Author Photo

    To curb the historically high rates of attrition among female lawyers, Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan and Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks suggest firms must normalize hybrid work schedules, and they recommend best practices to promote engagement among all attorneys, regardless of where they work.

  • Baltimore Bill Is Most Draconian Facial Recognition Ban Yet

    Author Photo

    Because Baltimore's recently passed bill banning use of facial recognition by private entities goes even further than Portland's ban by imposing criminal penalties and may encourage lawmakers in other jurisdictions, companies need to institute flexible, adaptable biometric privacy compliance frameworks, says David Oberly at Blank Rome.

  • What Cartel Enforcement Under Biden's DOJ Might Look Like

    Author Photo

    While President Joe Biden did not mention cartel enforcement in his recent competition executive order and has yet to appoint a new leader for the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division, policies from previous administrations may provide insight on where enforcement initiatives are headed, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • A Practical Metric For Annual Patent Filing Targets: Part 3

    Author Photo

    Using the theoretical target for nonprovisional applications calculated in Part 1 of this three-part article, U.S. companies can factor in expected costs for preparing and filing foreign patent applications to outline a portfolio management budget, say Michael Sartori and Matthew Welch at Baker Botts.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!