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Cybersecurity & Privacy

  • October 17, 2018

    Ex-Fed Agent Can't Ditch Silk Road Bitcoin Theft Sentence

    A California federal judge Wednesday denied an ex-Secret Service agent’s bid to vacate a nearly six-year sentence for stealing bitcoin during an investigation of black market website Silk Road, saying the law enforcement officer “knowingly and voluntarily” entered into his plea deal and his counsel “was not ineffective.”

  • October 17, 2018

    NY Times Urges Judge To Unseal Docs In Trump Dossier Row

    The New York Times asked a Florida federal court Wednesday to unseal documents filed by both sides of a Russian tech executive’s defamation lawsuit against BuzzFeed over its publishing of a dossier alleging ties between Russia and President Donald Trump.

  • October 17, 2018

    FTC On Ropes As Courts Wallop Suits Over Past Conduct

    The Federal Trade Commission's power to punish past conduct involving consumer fraud or anti-competitive shenanigans is looking wobbly after a one-two punch of court decisions forcing the agency to also identify imminent or ongoing violations when it challenges prior behavior.

  • October 17, 2018

    A High Court Milestone Stirs Hope Of Gender Parity

    After an emotionally fraught confirmation process with sexual misconduct allegations front and center, a new justice joins the Supreme Court bench and brings four female clerks with him. The hires bring gender parity to the court's clerkship ranks for the first time, but will the shift be long-lasting? (This article is part of a series examining gender gaps at the high court.)

  • October 17, 2018

    EBay Accuses Amazon Of Poaching Top Sellers

    EBay Inc. hit Amazon.com with a lawsuit in California state court Wednesday, accusing the Seattle-based online retail giant of orchestrating a massive campaign to poach top sellers from eBay's online trading platform in violation of the California Computer Data Access and Fraud Act and state business statutes.

  • October 17, 2018

    Jury Will Likely Decide Legality Of Disney’s Kid Data Scrape

    A California federal judge expressed ambivalence Wednesday about putative class claims that Disney, Viacom and others illegally sold information surreptitiously culled from child video gamers, saying while the data didn’t seem very private, a jury should likely decide whether “a reasonable person would find this offensive.”

  • October 17, 2018

    Sultzer Law Adds 2 Class Action Pros From Wolf Haldenstein

    The Sultzer Law Group has nabbed two Wolf Haldenstein Adler Freeman & Herz LLP partners to bolster its New York City offerings with their extensive experience litigating class actions in areas such as product liability, cybersecurity and privacy, antitrust, employment and securities, the firm said Tuesday.

  • October 17, 2018

    Hertz Says Consumer's Robocalls Suit Too Narrow For Class

    The Hertz Corp. has asked an Illinois federal judge to dismiss a consumer's proposed class action alleging invasion of privacy based on robocalls the company made to him when his mother kept a car weeks past due, saying the circumstances are too specific to represent a group.

  • October 17, 2018

    ABA Says Attys Must Inform Clients After A Data Breach

    The American Bar Association unveiled ethics rules Wednesday that require attorneys to notify current clients in the event of a data breach and to keep clients updated on the findings of any investigation into the breach.

  • October 16, 2018

    Facebook Users Say Consent Wasn't Informed In Privacy Row

    A proposed class of Facebook users urged the Ninth Circuit on Tuesday to revive their suit alleging the social media giant illegally scraped information about their visits to medical websites, saying their consent to the company’s terms was meaningless because they’d relied on its promise that “privacy is important to us.”

  • October 16, 2018

    Ex-Equifax Engineer Gets House Arrest For Insider Trading

    A former Equifax Inc. software development manager who pled guilty over the summer to making a nearly $76,000 profit on inside knowledge of the credit reporting giant's headline-grabbing data breach was sentenced in Georgia federal court on Tuesday to eight months of home confinement.

  • October 16, 2018

    Viacom Can't Arbitrate Kids' Data Privacy Row, Judge Says

    A California federal judge has shot down Viacom's bid to send to arbitration a proposed class action accusing it of unlawfully collecting and selling personal information belonging to children who used one of its mobile apps, ruling that there was no evidence that the users had ever seen or agreed to the arbitration requirement.

  • October 16, 2018

    5M Walmart Workers Want Cert. In Background Check Suit

    A proposed class of five million Walmart applicants and employees have pressed a California federal judge for certification in a suit accusing the retail giant of adding extraneous material to background check notices it issued to applicants and new hires in violation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act. 

  • October 16, 2018

    National Security Prosecutor Returns To DLA Piper As Partner

    DLA Piper has added a former federal prosecutor who focused on cybercrime, terrorism and trade sanctions back to the roster in its Chicago office, this time as a partner, the firm announced.

  • October 16, 2018

    Trump's Rulemaking Agenda Aims To Cut $18B In Costs

    President Donald Trump's administration is set to launch another round of regulatory actions aimed at what it claims will cut costs for private industry across the country, previewing the fall unified agenda meant to cut an estimated $18 billion in costs from the marketplace that is set to be released Wednesday.

  • October 16, 2018

    Attys Get $4.3M In Fees In $17M HIV Disclosure Settlement

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has granted final approval to Aetna Inc.’s $17 million deal to settle claims the managed health care giant wrongly disclosed patients’ HIV-related information and also awarded more than $4.3 million in fees and cost reimbursements for the patients’ attorneys.

  • October 16, 2018

    BuzzFeed Sues For Info On Kushner, 'Liberty' Task Force

    BuzzFeed lodged a pair of Freedom of Information Act suits in D.C. federal court Monday alleging the State Department won't turn over U.S. Embassy records relating to Jared Kushner and the Justice Department is withholding information about a task force created to enforce the Trump administration's controversial religious liberty guidance.

  • October 16, 2018

    The Path To Becoming A Supreme Court Advocate

    A look at the careers of attorneys who have dominated oral advocacy at the U.S. Supreme Court over the last decade shows a similar path for men and women, with a few key differences. Here’s how the top 10 male and female advocates stack up. (This article is part of a series examining the gender gap among high court advocates.)

  • October 16, 2018

    VW Can't Duck Court Rules In Robocall Suit, Class Says

    A certified class of Volkswagen owners suing over robocalls has urged a California federal court not to bend its rule restricting parties to only one summary judgment motion, saying the German automaker already wasted its only chance.

  • October 16, 2018

    NHS Lost £92M To Wannacry Cyberattack, UK Gov't Says

    The international Wannacry cyberattack in 2017 cost Britain’s National Health Service £92 million ($121 million), the government has said, as the extent of the damage caused by the unprecedented strike emerges.

Expert Analysis

  • How FTC Is Stepping Up Its Consumer Protection Efforts

    Jonice Gray Tucker

    The Federal Trade Commission, which once dominated the playing field on many consumer protection issues, appears poised to reclaim a more active role in connection with financial products and services, say attorneys with Buckley Sandler LLP.

  • Class Arbitration Goes To The Supreme Court

    Jay Bogan

    A U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Varela v. Lamps Plus that the Federal Arbitration Act displaces contractual interpretation rules likely would vacate the Eleventh Circuit's recent JPay decision, says James Bogan of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP.

  • Crypto As Commodity, And The Bankruptcy Implications

    Joanne Lee Molinaro

    With the recent ruling in My Big Coin Pay that bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are “commodities,” bankruptcy courts will likely have greater discretion regarding how to treat the valuation of cryptocurrencies in a variety of contexts, say Joanne Lee Molinaro and Susan Poll Klaessy of Foley & Lardner LLP.

  • A Holistic Approach To Client Retention

    Dan Tacone

    In an era when law firms are fighting for business and clients can dictate the terms of the relationship, "value" has become a moving target. Firms that take a proactive approach by using strategies designed to articulate value over time will gain the competitive advantage, says Dan Tacone at Intapp Inc.

  • Can Blockchain Deliver Secure IT Solutions For Health Care?

    Jonathan Gordon

    Blockchain-powered tools may revolutionize health care by allowing providers to easily exchange medical and health records while still protecting patients' information, but entrepreneurs must carefully consider novel legal challenges and questions, say Jonathan Gordon and Jesse Welsh-Keyser of Alston & Bird LLP.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Allens Pricing Chief Pier D'Angelo

    Pier D'Angelo

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Pier D'Angelo, chief pricing and practice officer at Allens.

  • Data Privacy Vs. Cybersecurity At Your Company

    Scott Warren

    ​Which is more important — data privacy or cybersecurity? ​M​ost in-house counsel know the answer depends on which receives the limited available compliance budget.​ But companies should think about the issue from a broader trade secret perspective, says Scott Warren of Squire Patton Boggs LLP.

  • Opinion

    The ABA Was Dead Wrong About Model Rule 8.4(g)

    Bradley Abramson

    In the two years since the American Bar Association's controversial anti-discrimination and harassment rule, only one state has adopted it, while numerous state supreme courts, state attorneys general and legal groups have correctly rejected Model Rule 8.4(g) as a threat to lawyers' First Amendment rights, says Bradley Abramson, an attorney with Alliance Defending Freedom.

  • Do VPNs Spell Market Manipulation For Crypto Exchanges?

    Richard Malish

    Virtual private networks are a critical tool for privacy-minded cryptocurrency traders, but based on the New York attorney general's recent findings that VPNs may permit market manipulation, it would not be surprising if cryptocurrency exchanges are soon asked to explain their VPN access policies, says Richard Malish of NICE Actimize.

  • Opinion

    The Supreme Court Should Become Boring

    Alexander Klein

    In the aftermath of Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation, the U.S. Supreme Court should decline review of the nation's most polarizing political questions unless and until the questions become time-sensitive, says Alexander Klein, head of the commercial litigation group at Barket Epstein Kearon Aldea & LoTurco LLP.