Energy

  • February 27, 2024

    F-35 Parts Supplier Says New Lockheed Claim Is Too Late

    Titanium parts supplier Howmet Aerospace Inc. says Lockheed Martin Corp. waited too long to accuse it of anticipatory breach of a contract to provide F-35 parts, saying Lockheed had long known of Howmet's plan to leave the market in 2025.

  • February 27, 2024

    Energy Dept. Awards $45M For Tech That Stops Cyberattacks

    The U.S. Department of Energy said it is awarding $45 million to industry stakeholders and academic projects that look to reduce cybersecurity threats and help protect systems within the nation's power grid against cyberattacks.

  • February 27, 2024

    PacifiCorp Faces $50M Ask In Latest Wildfire Trial

    Nine Oregonians and a summer camp for the disabled went to trial Tuesday in state court against PacifiCorp, asking a Portland jury to award at least $50 million after a cluster of 2020 wildfires left them with "nowhere to go, but nowhere to return to."

  • February 27, 2024

    SunZia Line Injunction Needed To Save Sites, Ariz. Tribes Say

    Two Native American tribes and conservation groups seeking to halt construction of a 550-mile power line have renewed their push for a preliminary injunction, arguing that without the order, important cultural and historical sites in the San Pedro Valley will be reduced to collateral damage.

  • February 27, 2024

    Passenger Rips United's Bid To Dump Sustainable Fuels Suit

    United Airlines can't hide behind federal statute to escape state fraud claims that it deceptively marketed its use of sustainable aviation fuels and its plans to be green and carbon-neutral, a customer suing the company told a Maryland federal judge Monday.

  • February 27, 2024

    Trial Over Ch. 11 Trustee In Eletson Bankruptcy Set For April

    A New York bankruptcy judge scheduled an April trial to determine whether to appoint a Chapter 11 trustee in the bankruptcy of Eletson Holdings, while directing the tanker company and its unsecured creditors to continue mediation.

  • February 27, 2024

    NH Power Plant Gets OK On Purchaser Settlement In Ch. 11

    Bankrupt New Hampshire power plant Burgess Biopower LLC will receive a $3.35 million payment from a power purchaser that allegedly withheld money it owed last year, reaching a settlement agreement between the parties that won a Delaware federal judge's blessing on Tuesday.

  • February 27, 2024

    States, Businesses Aim To Kill Feds' Revised Water Rule

    States and business groups have asked a North Dakota federal judge to force the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to revise regulations intended to define the scope of the federal government's authority under the Clean Water Act.

  • February 27, 2024

    Chevron's $53B Hess Buy Hits Snag Over Guyana Oil Dispute

    Chevron has revealed in a regulatory filing that Exxon Mobil Corp. and the China National Offshore Oil Corp. believe they have preemptive rights to buy Hess' stake in a lucrative oil project off the coast of Guyana, a hitch Chevron said could lead to failure to close its planned $53 billion acquisition of Hess. 

  • February 27, 2024

    Investors Can't Block $1.6B Oil Co. Merger, Chancery Says

    Warrant holders of deep-water oil producer QuarterNorth Energy who say they're being dragged unwillingly into its $1.6 billion merger with Talos Energy may not prevent the cashing out of their warrants because it could jeopardize the transaction and hurt QuarterNorth shareholders, Delaware's Court of Chancery has ruled.

  • February 27, 2024

    Energy Co. Asks 8th Circ. To Revive Lease Termination Suit

    A Denver-based energy company has told the Eighth Circuit that a North Dakota federal judge was wrong to dismiss its lease termination suit and hold that it had not exhausted its administrative remedies when its appeal of the Bureau of Indian Affairs decision had dragged on for nine-plus years.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ex-Ohio Speaker Urges 6th Circ. To Ax His 20-Year Sentence

    Former Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder told the Sixth Circuit that it must vacate his 20-year prison sentence for allegedly taking $60 million in bribes from FirstEnergy Corp., in part, because the presiding judge had a potential bias against him for opposing the judge's campaign to join the state's highest court.

  • February 27, 2024

    No Merit To Gas Pipeline Safety Rules Fight, Feds Say

    The U.S. Department of Transportation on Monday urged the D.C. Circuit to reject a gas pipeline industry group's challenge of a handful of new safety standards for transmission pipelines, saying it shouldn't be legally second-guessed over what amounts to a policy disagreement at the margins.

  • February 27, 2024

    New Fuel Terminals Ban Doesn't Discriminate, Judge Says

    An Oregon federal judge has recommended the dismissal of a lawsuit in which Montana and a collection of fuel industry groups are challenging a ban on new oil and gas terminals in Portland, Oregon, saying there's no evidence the ban unconstitutionally discriminates against out-of-state companies.

  • February 27, 2024

    Project Finance Group Of The Year: Winston & Strawn

    With an achievement list spanning an unusual private market community solar portfolio, financing the Las Vegas Sphere, toll roads and New York City subway connectivity, Winston & Strawn LLP has solidified a place on Law360's 2023 Practice Groups of the Year.

  • February 27, 2024

    Chevron Fired Female Manager But Let Men Slide, Suit Says

    Chevron fired a female manager for keeping quiet about workers changing COVID-19 test records to evade travel restrictions but let men who did the same thing keep their jobs, according to a complaint filed in Texas federal court.

  • February 27, 2024

    Deal-Makers Expect Further Uptick In M&A-Related Disputes

    Global deal-makers expected increases in mergers and acquisitions-related disputes moving into 2024 after high interest rates and financing constraints created challenges to sealing deals, according to Berkeley Research Group's M&A Disputes Report 2024, which was reviewed by Law360 on Tuesday and is expected to be released in the coming days.

  • February 27, 2024

    Atlas Energy Solutions Buying Hi-Crush In $450M Deal

    Atlas Energy Solutions Inc. said Tuesday it has agreed to purchase Hi-Crush Inc., including its Permian Basin proppant production assets and North American logistics operations, in a transaction that is valued at $450 million and expected to close by the end of this month.

  • February 27, 2024

    Energy, Infrastructure Pro Rejoins V&E In Houston

    Vinson & Elkins LLP is welcoming back a longtime attorney, announcing Monday that an energy and infrastructure expert is rejoining the firm as a partner in its Houston office after a brief foray working with an energy emissions reduction software company.

  • February 26, 2024

    Convicted Nikola Founder Must Forfeit Ranch, Judge Says

    A New York federal judge on Monday ruled Nikola Corp. founder Trevor Milton, who received a 4-year prison sentence for fraudulently inflating the truck-maker's value on Wall Street, must forfeit his 4,700-acre Utah property, citing the seriousness of Milton's crime and that he bought the ranch using inflated stock options.

  • February 26, 2024

    Feds Want PacifiCorp To Cover $1B Ore., Calif. Wildfire Costs

    PacifiCorp revealed in a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing Monday that the U.S. Department of Justice is potentially looking to collect more than $1 billion from the company to cover costs related to 2020 wildfires in Oregon and California, even threatening to take one matter to court.

  • February 26, 2024

    NIST Widens Cybersecurity Framework To Cover All Industries

    The U.S. Department of Commerce agency that developed a landmark cybersecurity framework for critical infrastructure operators announced Monday that it had finalized a long-anticipated update, aimed at helping all industry sectors and organizations, to a voluntary tool to better manage cyber risks.

  • February 26, 2024

    Russia Says $5B Naftogaz Award Can't Be Enforced

    Russia urged a D.C. federal court to toss litigation filed by Ukraine's state-owned oil and gas company to enforce a $5 billion arbitral award the company won after its Crimean assets were seized, arguing the court lacks jurisdiction since the underlying investments are in Ukraine.

  • February 26, 2024

    Apache's $3B Write-Down Merits Bigger Class, Investors Say

    A group of Apache Corp. investors on the cusp of winning class certification are arguing that their promised class should be extended to encompass even more investors who were allegedly deceived by company promises of a potentially lucrative drilling project that ultimately led to a $3 billion write-down when it went bust. 

  • February 26, 2024

    Albright Pauses DOE's Crypto Mining Survey, For Now

    A Texas federal judge has temporarily barred the U.S. Department of Energy from requiring crypto mining firms to provide data on their electricity usage after a lawsuit from a Texas industry group and a bitcoin mining firm accused the government of skirting the process to approve the survey.

Expert Analysis

  • Aviation Back On Course, But Keep Seat Belts Fastened

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    While the airline industry finally returned to profitability last year for the first time since the onset of COVID-19, and is poised for historic levels of traffic in 2024, supply chain problems and economic and geopolitical uncertainty persist — so more turbulence may lie ahead, say Kevin Lewis and Bart Biggers at Sidley.

  • Employer Trial Tips For Fighting Worker PPE Pay Claims

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    Courts have struggled for decades to reach consensus on whether employees must be paid for time spent donning and doffing personal protective equipment, but this convoluted legal history points to practical trial strategies to help employers defeat these Fair Labor Standards Act claims, say Michael Mueller and Evangeline Paschal at Hunton.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Brazil

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    Environmental, social and governance issues have increasingly translated into new legislation in Brazil since 2020, and in the wake of these recently enacted regulations, we are likely to see a growing number of legal disputes in the largest South American country related to ESG issues such as greenwashing if companies are not prepared to adequately adapt and comply, say attorneys at Mattos Filho.

  • Vagueness In Calif. Climate Law Makes Compliance Tricky

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    California's recently enacted Voluntary Carbon Market Disclosures Act requires companies making claims of carbon neutrality, or significant greenhouse gas emissions reductions, to disclose information supporting those claims — but vague and conflicting language in the statute poses multiple problems for businesses, say John Rousakis and Chris Bowman at O'Melveny.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Harmonizing Agricultural And Clean Energy Goals

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    Congress' extension of the Farm Bill offers a chance to more thoroughly consider innovation and investments that could transform the competition between farmers and solar developers into synergistic agrivoltaic systems, which use land for both agriculture and solar energy generation, say attorneys at Husch Blackwell.

  • CFTC Moves May Boost Interest In Voluntary Carbon Markets

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    As companies try to reduce their net greenhouse gas emissions, many have been cautious about embracing voluntary carbon credit markets — but recent moves by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission to regulate this sector may address some of its well-known challenges, say Deborah North and Laura Daugherty at Cleary.

  • 3 Strategies For Aggressive Judgment Enforcement

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    As illustrated by the many creditors of Citgo Petroleum Corp. who may walk away empty-handed — despite the company's court-ordered sale — it is important to start investigating counterparty assets and planning for enforcement even before obtaining a judgment, says Brian Asher at Asher Research.

  • Musk Pay Package Ruling Offers Detailed Lesson On Del. Law

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    Anat Alon-Beck and John Livingstone at Case Western Reserve University discuss the specifics that led Delaware's chancellor to rescind Elon Musk's $55.8 billion Tesla pay package on Jan. 30, how the state’s entire fairness doctrine played into the ruling, and its bigger-picture impact on the executive compensation landscape.

  • Key Maritime Law Issues In 2024: Election-Year Unknowns

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    In the final installment of this three-part article reviewing the top challenges for the maritime industry this year, Sean Pribyl at Holland & Knight examines how the uncertainty surrounding the forthcoming U.S. election may affect the maritime sector — especially companies involved in offshore wind and deep-sea mining.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • Key Maritime Law Issues In 2024: Environmental Challenges

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    In the second installment of this three-part article examining key concerns for the maritime sector this year, Sean Pribyl at Holland & Knight considers how the industry will be affected by environmental concerns — including the growing push for decarbonization, and regulatory scrutiny around greenwashing and ESG issues.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Key Maritime Law Issues In 2024: Geopolitics And Sanctions

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    Major challenges are on the horizon for the U.S. maritime sector in 2024, including geopolitical tensions in the Red Sea and ever-evolving sanctions targeting Iran and Russia — which may lead to higher shipping costs and greater compliance burdens for stakeholders, says Sean Pribyl at Holland & Knight.

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