Energy

  • July 17, 2019

    Clifford Chance Brings Bankruptcy Partner To NY Office

    Clifford Chance LLP has boosted its U.S. financial structuring group by bringing in a corporate bankruptcy specialist from Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP as a partner in its New York office.

  • July 17, 2019

    FERC Keeps Up LNG Approvals Despite Climate Concerns

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approved a Kinder Morgan-backed liquefied natural gas export project, continuing what's become a regular pattern of overruling concerns from Democratic commissioners that the agency is falling short in its climate change analysis of such projects.

  • July 17, 2019

    TC Energy Wants In On New Keystone XL Pipeline Suit

    TC Energy asked a Montana federal court on Tuesday to allow it to intervene in a suit brought by environmental activists challenging permits issued allowing the construction of the Keystone XL Pipeline, saying it has significant economic interests hinging on the court's ruling.

  • July 16, 2019

    Fracking Co. Wins $5.3M In Insurance Row Over Busted Gear

    A Texas county court awarded a hydraulic fracturing company $5.3 million following a jury win against its insurance company in a breach of contract and bad faith suit over damaged oil and gas equipment, according to the plaintiff's attorneys.

  • July 16, 2019

    A Look Back At Justice Stevens' Most Important Opinions

    Justice John Paul Stevens wrote over 1,000 opinions in his 34 years on the U.S. Supreme Court, leaving a footprint in the court’s jurisprudence still visible today. Here, Law360 looks back at his most important decisions, from landmark First Amendment cases to those involving the separation of powers.

  • July 16, 2019

    5th Circ. Won't Revive Investors' Suit Over Calif. Oil Spill

    Optimistic and "aspirational" statements by Plains All American Pipeline LP about the condition of a California pipeline that broke in 2015 and caused an oil spill aren't enough to revive a shareholder lawsuit accusing the company of being misleading, the Fifth Circuit said Tuesday.

  • July 16, 2019

    Justice John Paul Stevens' Brand Of Judicial Humility

    His critics called him a "liberal activist." His fans? A "liberal icon." But those who worked for Justice John Paul Stevens remember a common law judge who took things one case at a time.

  • July 16, 2019

    Dominion Asks DC Court Not To Dismantle Power Project

    Dominion Energy Inc. urged a D.C. federal court Monday to remand its permit for an already-completed electricity transmission project to the Army Corps of Engineers without voiding it, arguing the results of an environmental study could still end up clearing the project.

  • July 16, 2019

    Injured Driver's Story Lacks 'Common Sense,' NY Court Says

    A New York state appeals court on Tuesday affirmed the dismissal of a suit accusing a commercial truck driver of causing an auto collision in the Bronx that injured a woman, saying her testimony was implausible and lacked "common sense."

  • July 16, 2019

    EP Energy Must Pay $41M For Oil And Gas Lease Payments

    A Texas judge said EP Energy must pay a trio of mineral owners in La Salle County, Texas, a total of $41 million, deciding that a provision in the lease agreement requires the company to pay more after signing an expensive deal nearby.

  • July 16, 2019

    Retired Justice John Paul Stevens, Hero To Left, Dead At 99

    Retired Justice John Paul Stevens, a World War II veteran who became a liberal icon during his more than three decades on the U.S. Supreme Court, died Tuesday at 99, the Supreme Court said.

  • July 16, 2019

    5th Circ. OKs $43.2M Jury Verdict In Well Plugging Suit

    The Fifth Circuit on Tuesday affirmed a $43.2 million jury verdict for Apache Deepwater LLC, holding W&T Offshore Inc. liable for the plugging and abandonment operations of three deepwater oil and gas wells in the Mississippi Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico.

  • July 16, 2019

    Ex-Alstom Exec Wants Bribe Case Tossed Over Years Of Delay

    A former U.K.-based executive of French corporation Alstom SA asked a Connecticut federal judge on Monday to end the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act case against him over delays that make the allegations "almost old enough to vote."

  • July 16, 2019

    Insurer Asks 5th Circ. To Uphold Phillips 66's Coverage Denial

    An insurer for a Phillips 66 Co. contractor urged the Fifth Circuit Tuesday to affirm a federal judge's ruling that it doesn't have to fund the energy company's defense of two suits filed by workers who were injured in a 2017 natural gas pipeline explosion.

  • July 16, 2019

    Utilities, Regulators Challenge FERC Energy Storage Rule

    Utility groups and an organization representing state utility regulators are challenging the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's landmark rule that makes a place for energy storage in wholesale electricity markets.

  • July 16, 2019

    Fracking Tech Patent Trial Halted As Parties Strike Deal

    A Colorado federal magistrate judge halted a trial set to begin next month in a suit accusing a Michigan oilfield service company of infringing a rival’s patented fueling system technology used in hydraulic fracturing, after the parties reached a confidential settlement agreement.

  • July 16, 2019

    China Plows Ahead With WTO Challenge To US Solar Tariffs

    China has asked the World Trade Organization to consider its challenge to the Trump administration's tariffs on imported cells used in solar panels, escalating tensions with the U.S. after prior efforts to resolve the trade disagreement fell short.

  • July 16, 2019

    Energy Cos. On Track To Resolve Fight Over $367M Award

    A D.C. federal judge has paused litigation filed by East Mediterranean Gas SAE to enforce a more than $367 million arbitral award against two Egyptian state-owned energy companies after the parties said they were on track to amicably resolve the matter.

  • July 16, 2019

    Shell Wants $34M Calif. Trespassing Verdict Thrown Out

    Shell Pipeline Co. LP told a California federal court that it should not have to face a nearly $34 million jury award in favor of three property owners that claimed Shell's pipelines trespassed on their land, arguing that the owners' legal theory at trial conflicted with the facts.

  • July 16, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Says Gov't Right To Deny Payment For Bias Suits

    The Federal Circuit on Tuesday upheld a Court of Federal Claims ruling siding with the government in its decision not to reimburse a contractor for the $500,000 it paid defending against two former employees’ sexual and racial discrimination claims.

  • July 16, 2019

    Clean Power Plan Foes Say New Rule Kills Court Case

    Challengers of the Obama administration's Clean Power Plan asked the D.C. Circuit late Monday to put out of its misery long-delayed litigation over the rule slashing greenhouse gas emissions from existing power plants, since the Trump administration has finally released a replacement rule.

  • July 16, 2019

    $8M Deal In Allied Power OT Row Needs Work, Judge Says

    Workers accusing Allied Power Services LLC of failing to pay overtime to certain employees have reached an $8 million settlement with the Illinois power company, but an Illinois federal judge said Tuesday that it needs some adjustments before he can grant preliminary approval.

  • July 16, 2019

    Emerge Energy Hits Ch. 11 In Del. With $339M In Debt

    Emerge Energy Services LP, which mines and distributes silica sand proppant for the oil and gas fracturing industry, filed late Monday for Chapter 11 protection in Delaware with roughly $339 million in debt and plans for a debt-for-equity swap.

  • July 16, 2019

    WTO Deals Another Blow To US CVDs On Chinese Goods

    The World Trade Organization’s Appellate Body ruled Tuesday that the U.S. government has continued to violate global trade rules with its countervailing duties on Chinese solar panels, wind towers, and various steel and aluminum products.

  • July 15, 2019

    Tribal Org. Blew Chance To Fight Pipeline, DC Circ. Told

    A Kinder Morgan unit has told the D.C. Circuit that a Rhode Island tribe's preservation office can't challenge a federal review of the company's pipeline expansion project because the office didn't take part in the review process.

Expert Analysis

  • An Analytical Approach To Defending Securities Class Claims

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    A recent analysis indicates that 33 securities class action complaints filed in the last year contain at least one alleged stock price drop that does not surpass the standards of indirect price impact. Verifiable absence of indirect price impact can help directors and officers execute a successful defense to negate class treatment, says Nessim Mezrahi of SAR.

  • Offshore Rig Ruling Checks State Claims At Shore

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's broad ruling in Parker Drilling v. Newton that federal — not state — wage laws apply to offshore oil workers is an important win for companies with operations on the Outer Continental Shelf, say attorneys at Paul Hastings.

  • DOJ's Citgo Case Highlights Reach, And Limits, Of FCPA

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    The bribes a Miami businessman recently admitted paying to executives of gasoline retailer Citgo violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, because Citgo is owned by the Venezuelan government. But there is scant case law for the U.S. Department of Justice to rely on in a case against Citgo itself, says Timothy Belevetz of Ice Miller.

  • Shippers Look To High Court For 'Safe Berth' Resolution

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    A charterer that nominates a “safe berth” to load and discharge cargo may or may not be obligated to guarantee the berth’s safety for the vessel, depending on where the issue is being litigated. The U.S. Supreme Court has an opportunity to resolve the question in its upcoming ruling in Frescatti Shipping, says Andrew Stakelum of King & Spalding.

  • 5 Ways Law Firms Can Improve Their Job Interviews

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    When evaluating potential new hires, law firms should utilize structured interviews in order to create a consistent rating system that accurately and effectively assesses candidates' skills and competencies, says Jennifer Henderson of Major Lindsey.

  • Colo.'s New Oil And Gas Law Shifts Rulemaking Landscape

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    A new Colorado law dramatically changes the regulation of oil and gas development in the state. Oil and gas development opponents and proponents should prepare for years of complicated rulemaking and public comment opportunities at the Colorado agencies, say Zachary Fitzgerald and Ivan London of Bryan Cave.

  • How To Streamline Virtual Law Team Mass Tort Defense

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    A primary benefit of the virtual law team in mass tort litigation is creative collaboration. A "company case" approach is essential to breaking down the silos between team members, say attorneys at FaegreBD and Reed Smith.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Fateful Phone Call

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    When I was growing up, my mother was always the more mild-mannered parent. But during a trans-Atlantic phone call in 1991, when I told her I wanted to go to culinary school instead of law school, she started yelling — at a volume I had never heard from her, says Jason Brookner of Gray Reed.

  • Law Firms Can Do Better With Their Mentoring Programs

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    There are a few practical, proactive steps law firms can take to create a mentoring program that pays dividends — instead of creating a mediocre program that both parties see as an obligation, says Kate Sheikh of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • How To Comply With NYC's New Climate Mobilization Act

    Excerpt from Lexis Practice Advisor
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    Even though compliance is not mandated until 2024, New York City building owners should begin taking steps now to prepare for the Climate Mobilization Act's new limits on buildings' greenhouse gas emissions, say YuhTyng Patka and David Miller of Duval & Stachenfeld.

  • The Latest Developments In Criminal Cases Against Execs

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    This spring, there was some noteworthy news in white collar government investigations impacting executives, including the first successful prosecution in the opioid bribery scheme and the first criminal charges for failure to report under the Consumer Product Safety Act, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

  • 'Rocket Docket' Justifies Its Name For 11th Straight Year

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    The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia “rocket docket” is still the fastest federal civil trial court in the country despite some recent trends causing its median time to trial to grow to 13.2 months, says Robert Tata of Hunton.

  • Companies In Canada Must Prepare For Shareholder Activism

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    The trend of increased shareholder activism in Canada continues in 2019, with 10 public proxy contests launched since January. It is important that boards and management try to listen and understand the views of shareholders — including activists — in good faith, say Jonathan Feldman and Michael Partridge of Goodmans.

  • What May Be Ahead For PE Infrastructure Investment In Asia

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    Despite some softening in Asian infrastructure deal volumes in 2018 and the first part of 2019, both fundraising targets and long-term investment prospects remain strong for private equity sponsors, say Scott Jalowayski and James Jackson at Gibson Dunn.

  • Measuring The Value Of A Law Firm's Social Media Efforts

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    Most legal marketers struggle to show the return on investment of their social media efforts, but establishing and answering several key questions can help demonstrate exactly how social media programs contribute to a law firm's bottom line, say Guy Alvarez of Good2bSocial and communications consultant Tom Orewyler.

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