Georgia

  • November 23, 2022

    GM Escapes Suit Over Engines' Oil Problems

    A Georgia federal judge has thrown out a proposed class action alleging General Motors hid oil issues in pickup engines, ruling that a driver waited too long to file his suit and couldn't back up engine defect allegations with an expert.

  • November 23, 2022

    Meet The Attys Guiding Co.'s Move To Split Off Atlanta Braves

    A team of 15 Baker Botts LLP attorneys, including a Dallas-based partner who leads the firm's corporate department, recently represented Liberty Media Corp. in a major restructuring to spin off the Atlanta Braves and the team's associated real estate holdings as a separate public company.

  • November 23, 2022

    Burr & Forman Adds 16 Attys Across Southeast

    Southeast firm Burr & Forman LLP announced 16 new hires across its offices in South Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee, led by the addition of four counsels in a wide range of practice areas.

  • November 23, 2022

    Shriners Can Join Ga. City Opposing T-Mobile Cell Tower

    A Shriners club in Columbus, Georgia, can join the city in a suit over the zoning board's rejection of a planned cellphone tower on club-owned land, according to a Tuesday ruling in federal court.

  • November 23, 2022

    Ga. Supreme Court Revives 6-Week Abortion Ban

    The Georgia Supreme Court has reinstated the state's ban on abortions after roughly six weeks of pregnancy while it considers the state's appeal of a lower court ruling that voided the 2019 law.

  • November 23, 2022

    Ga. Justices Won't Halt Expanded Voting In Senate Runoff

    The Supreme Court of Georgia has rejected an attempt by Republicans to block a state trial court's order allowing advance voting on Saturday in the U.S. Senate runoff election between Sen. Raphael Warnock and Herschel Walker.

  • November 22, 2022

    Ga. Justices To Ask If Innkeeper Is Actually A Landlord

    The Georgia Supreme Court will wade into the state's tenant-landlord laws when it decides whether an Atlanta-area motel is legally considered an innkeeper that can eject long-term tenants without going through an eviction process.

  • November 22, 2022

    11th Circ. Hints Special Master In Mar-A-Lago Case Won't Stay

    A trio of conservative Eleventh Circuit judges indicated Tuesday they are likely to overturn the unprecedented appointment of a special master to review documents seized by the federal government from former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate as part of an ongoing criminal investigation.

  • November 22, 2022

    US Sugar Defends $315M Imperial Buy To 3rd Circ.

    U.S. Sugar Corp. is defending its trial court victory against an antitrust challenge to its $315 million acquisition of Imperial Sugar Co., telling the Third Circuit on Monday that the U.S. Department of Justice can't use "gerrymandered" sugar markets to "distort the competitive impact" of the deal.

  • November 22, 2022

    Ga. Business Court Transfers $18M Development Dispute

    Georgia's State-wide Business Court agreed to transfer an $18 million development contract dispute to another court Monday at the request of the case's defendants, pointing to a controversial state law requiring both parties to consent to its jurisdiction.

  • November 22, 2022

    Ex-Fisher Phillips Atty Renews Bond Bid Before Murder Retrial

    A former Fisher Phillips partner who was denied bond in October after his murder conviction in the shooting death of his wife was overturned by the Georgia Supreme Court has again asked for bond, pending a retrial.

  • November 22, 2022

    11th Circ. Petitioned Over FCC's Universal Service Fund

    The nonprofit advocacy group Consumers' Research filed an opening brief Tuesday in its third suit in the Eleventh Circuit challenging the constitutionality of the Federal Communications Commission's fund for providing universal communication services, while almost identical complaints from the group continue to make their way through the Fifth and Sixth circuits.

  • November 22, 2022

    John Deere Says Tractor Explosion Suit Filed Too Late

    Farm equipment maker John Deere has told a Georgia federal court that a liability suit alleging that a hydraulic line in one of its tractors exploded, severing a man's right leg and intestines, was filed seven years too late under Georgia law.

  • November 21, 2022

    Infinity Q Founder Pleads Out In $1B Valuation Fraud Case

    The founder and former chief investment officer of Infinity Q Capital Management on Monday pled guilty to securities fraud, after being accused of inflating the hedge fund's assets by more than $1 billion and lying to regulators in a failed attempt at a coverup.

  • November 21, 2022

    Republicans Tell 11th Circ. To Uphold CDC Mask Mandate Ax

    A group of Republican members of the House of Representatives and Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul urged the Eleventh Circuit on Monday to uphold a lower court ruling ending the federal mask mandate for public transportation, arguing that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention overstepped its authority.

  • November 21, 2022

    Chrisleys Sentenced To Prison In $36M Bank Fraud Case

    Todd and Julie Chrisley of the reality television show "Chrisley Knows Best" were sentenced Monday evening by a federal judge in Atlanta to 12 and seven years in prison, respectively, and ordered to pay $17.2 million in restitution in relation to a $36 million bank fraud scheme and tax evasion.

  • November 21, 2022

    Ga. Court Worker Says Clerk Ordered Her To Destroy Records

    A Georgia judicial staffer has accused a Cobb County Superior Court clerk of ordering her to delete public records showing that the clerk improperly kept all her office's passport processing fees, allegedly saying "we're just going to Donald Trump this."

  • November 21, 2022

    Ga. Court Won't Ax Early Voting Expansion In Senate Runoff

    A Georgia appeals court denied the state's bid to block the expansion of advance voting in its nail-biting U.S. Senate runoff election by one day, in an order issued Monday, just hours after Georgia moved to appeal a state trial court's ruling.

  • November 21, 2022

    Ga. Court Is Asked To Enforce Abortion Law During Appeal

    Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp has asked the state's Supreme Court to temporarily block a lower court's order that rendered the state's controversial six-week abortion ban unenforceable last week, arguing that "unborn children" will bear the brunt of the lengthy appeals process.

  • November 18, 2022

    Hotels' Push To Counter Sex Trafficking Wins Mixed Reviews

    Amid a growing wave of criminal and civil suits aimed at hotels for alleged facilitation of sex trafficking, the hospitality industry has embraced a more proactive approach to identifying and responding to the crime. Here, Law360 looks at the focus of such efforts as well as their strengths and weaknesses.

  • November 18, 2022

    Insurers Ask 11th Circ. To Dodge Fla. Atty Malpractice Claims

    A pair of insurance companies told the Eleventh Circuit that they should not have had to defend a Florida attorney in a now-dismissed state case accusing him of conspiring to defraud a client during an alleged scheme to invest in a "super car" company.

  • November 18, 2022

    Insurer Right To Void Doctor's Policy For Fraud, 11th Circ. Told

    MetLife was entitled to rescind a disability policy it issued to a Florida doctor because of fraud, the insurer told the Eleventh Circuit on Friday, arguing that a lower court correctly found that it canceled the policy within a reasonable amount of time after learning about the doctor's application misstatements.

  • November 18, 2022

    Couple Says Subdivision Covenant Can't Ban Therapy Horses

    A Georgia couple is claiming in federal court that their neighbors can't enforce a covenant preventing them from keeping horses and other therapy animals for their daughter on the "mini farm" the couple purchased in a subdivision, citing the Fair Housing Amendments Act.

  • November 18, 2022

    Judge Hands 48-Year Sentence In Whistleblower Murder Case

    A Georgia federal judge on Thursday sentenced a man to more than 48 years in prison for his involvement in the murder of a worker who exposed his scheme to steal millions from undocumented workers. 

  • November 18, 2022

    Ga. Judge Expands Advance Voting In Senate Runoff

    Georgians are allowed to vote the Saturday after Thanksgiving in the U.S. Senate runoff election between Raphael Warnock and Herschel Walker, a Georgia state trial judge ruled Friday, blocking the state's plan to bar precincts from opening that day.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funders Seek Transparency In Disclosure Debate

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    Litigation funders want to correct the record on calls for funding disclosure in the name of transparency, as this purported justification obscures the disclosure's adverse effects — prejudicing plaintiffs' cases and discouraging the assertion of meritorious legal claims, say Dai Wai Chin Feman and William Weisman at Parabellum Capital.

  • Tale Of 2 Mergers: The DOJ Antitrust Division's Mixed Results

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    Attorneys at V&E look at the U.S. Department of Justice Antitrust Division's recent successful challenge to Penguin Random House’s purchase of Simon & Schuster, and its unsuccessful challenge to U.S. Sugar’s acquisition of Imperial Sugar — exploring the market realities, the strength of witness testimony and the affected stakeholders in each case.

  • 5 Principles For Better Professional Development Programs

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    The pandemic and ensuing "great resignation" have resulted in a more transient legal work force, but law firms can use effective professional development programs to bridge a cultural gap with new associates and stem associate attrition, says Matthew Woods at Robins Kaplan.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Practice With Passion

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    First Circuit Judge Gustavo Gelpí recalls how Suffolk University Law School's Joseph Glannon taught the importance of the law as both a tool and a profession, and that those who wish to practice law successfully must do so with love, enthusiasm and passion.

  • Opinion

    State-Led Programs Can Speed Up Brownfield Development

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    Too often, publicly funded brownfields programs are not optimized to achieve redevelopment in the near term, but policymakers can address this problem by directing additional resources toward state-level brownfields programs that offer thoughtfully designed tax incentives and liability protection, says Gerald Pouncey at Morris Manning.

  • State AG Consumer Protection Shift Isn't An Election Fad

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    We are starting to see the first signs of a new state attorney general consumer enforcement paradigm emerge — with creative use of most favored nation clauses as structural tools — and that is unlikely to end when the last ballot is counted for the 2022 election, says O.H. Skinner at Alliance for Consumers.

  • Miss. Ruling Deepens Jurisdiction Split In Vape Battery Cases

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    The Mississippi Supreme Court’s recent decision in Dilworth v. LG Chem demonstrates that foreign entities whose products enter the state’s nascent medical cannabis market can be sued there — deepening a judicial divide over personal jurisdiction in exploding vape battery cases, say Slates Veazey and Jaime Weida at Bradley Arant.

  • Questions To Ask Before Making A Lateral Move As Partner

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    Law firm partners considering lateral moves should diligently interview prospects — going beyond standard questions about compensation to inquire about culture, associate retention and other areas that can provide a more comprehensive view, says Lauren Wu at VOYLegal.

  • Navigating Whether Workers' Cannabis Use Is Protected

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    Although a recent Nevada decision that an employee's nonwork cannabis consumption wasn’t protected against employer retaliation suggests state "lawful activities" laws may not always cover off-duty cannabis use, employers must also ensure policies and practices don’t run afoul of such statutes, says Jennifer Mora at Seyfarth.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Argue Open-Mindedly

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    Queens College President Frank Wu reflects on how Yale Kamisar’s teaching and guidance at the University of Michigan Law School emphasized a capacity to engage with alternative worldviews and the importance of the ability to argue for both sides of a debate.

  • ABA's No-Contact Rule Advice Raises Questions For Lawyers

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    The American Bar Association's ethics committee recently issued two opinions concerning the no-contact rule — one creates an intuitive and practical default for electronic communications, while the other sets a potential trap for pro se lawyers, say Lauren Snyder and Deepika Ravi at HWG.

  • 4 Key Skills For An Effective Attorney Coaching Conversation

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    As BigLaw firms are increasingly offering internal coaching as one of many talent strategies to stem ongoing lawyer attrition, Stacey Schwartz at Katten discusses how coaches can help attorneys achieve their goals.

  • Perspectives

    How Civilian Attorneys Can Help Veterans

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    With legal aid topping the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' annual list of unmet needs of veterans facing housing insecurity, nonmilitary volunteer attorneys can provide some of the most effective legal services to military and veteran clients, say Anna Richardson at Veterans Legal Services and Nicholas Hasenfus at Holland & Knight.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned That Culture Shapes Law

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    U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff of the Southern District of New York considers how a class with Jerry Cohen at Harvard Law helped him understand culture and history’s influence on jurisprudence, and how even seemingly settled law can evolve — all while espousing a more humanistic approach to teaching that restored Judge Rakoff's pride in being a lawyer.

  • 9 Legal Ethics Considerations In Natural Disaster Preparation

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    Since natural disasters like Hurricane Ian do not relieve lawyers of their ethical obligations to clients, law firms should focus their preparedness efforts on specific areas crucial to continuity of representation and ethics compliance, like business and communications contingency planning, record redundancy and more, says Mark Hinderks at Stinson.

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