Health

  • July 11, 2019

    Eli Lilly Searches For New GC As Top Atty Plans To Retire

    Eli Lilly and Co. on Thursday announced that its senior vice president and general counsel plans to retire at the end of 2019 after 28 years with the pharmaceutical company, and a search has begun for his successor.

  • July 11, 2019

    Premera Blue Cross To Pay States $10M To End Breach Probe

    Premera Blue Cross will pay $10 million to 30 states to settle allegations related to a 2014 data breach that compromised the personal information of more than 10.4 million people, according to announcements Thursday by state attorneys general.

  • July 11, 2019

    Indiana AG Says Medical Debt Collector Belongs In Ch. 7

    Indiana's attorney general wants to force the troubled medical debt collection company responsible for a breach that exposed the personal data of 20 million consumers into liquidation, telling a New York bankruptcy court there's no reason Retrieval-Masters Creditors Bureau Inc. should retain control of its own fate.

  • July 11, 2019

    Mass. Top Court Expands Hearsay Rule In Civil Cases

    Massachusetts' highest court ruled Thursday that a witness who cannot recall a particular conversation can be deemed "unavailable" and fall under one of the exceptions to the hearsay rule, ordering a new trial in the case of a woman who suffered permanent injuries after a surgery.

  • July 11, 2019

    Reckitt To Pay $1.4B To End US Opioid Probe

    British pharmaceutical company Reckitt Benckiser said Thursday it will pay U.S. authorities up to $1.4 billion to settle a long-running investigation into sales of a treatment for addiction to opioids by its former prescription drugs business.

  • July 10, 2019

    Ex-Puerto Rico Officials Charged In $15.5M Contracts Scheme

    The FBI reportedly arrested six individuals, including two former Puerto Rico agency heads, on Wednesday, a day after prosecutors entered a lengthy, 32-count grand jury indictment alleging a sprawling $15.5 million federal contracts conspiracy.

  • July 10, 2019

    Opioid Crisis Not Ex-J&J Subsidiary's Fault, Exec Testifies

    An executive of an opioid ingredient supplier formerly owned by Johnson & Johnson testified Wednesday in Oklahoma's trailblazing trial accusing J&J of causing the opioid crisis, saying the supplier only sold as much raw opioid ingredients as federal regulators allowed it to and that it bore zero responsibility for the crisis.

  • July 10, 2019

    Texas Doctor Beats Med Mal Suit On Bad Expert Report

    A Texas appellate court has tossed claims against a doctor who was accused alongside Baylor University Medical Center of prematurely discharging a patient after surgery, causing him to later fall and suffer injuries, with the court saying the opinion by the patient’s medical expert couldn't support the case.

  • July 10, 2019

    New Trial Upheld For J&J After $417M Talc Verdict

    A California appeals court on Tuesday upheld a lower court's decision to grant Johnson & Johnson a new trial after an initial $417 million jury award that was later tossed in a suit alleging that the company’s talcum baby powder caused a woman's fatal ovarian cancer.

  • July 10, 2019

    Morgan Lewis Settles $30M Pa. Suit Over Alleged Conflict

    Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP has inked a settlement to end a $30 million lawsuit accusing the firm of working against a client's interests by helping to build a case against it on behalf of a Wisconsin-based hospital system.

  • July 10, 2019

    Rite Aid Can't Arbitrate Generics Price Suit, Shopper Says

    A Rite Aid customer has shot back at the pharmacy chain's bid to force him to arbitrate his proposed class action accusing the company of overcharging customers who pay with insurance compared to the prices offered in its discount plan for cash-paying customers.

  • July 10, 2019

    Heritage Says Conn. Leaked Email About Congressional Probe

    Heritage Pharmaceuticals accused Connecticut's attorney general on Tuesday of including a privileged email in a new generic-drug price-fixing complaint that suggests the company tried to obstruct a congressional investigation.

  • July 10, 2019

    Insys May Face Restitution Above $30M Penalty For Kickbacks

    A division of Insys Therapeutics Inc. will pay at least $30 million in criminal penalties and may face additional restitution payments following a sentencing hearing Wednesday after the company pled guilty in a scheme to bribe doctors to prescribe opioids to patients who didn't need them.

  • July 10, 2019

    GSK Gets 2nd Chance To Argue Preemption In Zofran MDL

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Wednesday said GlaxoSmithKline will get another chance to argue that claims its anti-nausea drug Zofran caused birth defects are federally preempted, adding he will seek guidance from the FDA after a landmark high court ruling put the preemption question in his hands.

  • July 10, 2019

    3 Takeaways From Nixing Of Drug Pricing Rule

    The day before it was scheduled to go into effect, a D.C. federal judge struck down a Trump administration rule requiring drug prices to be disclosed in TV ads, a new regulation that could have amped up U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' regulatory power.

  • July 10, 2019

    Pa. Ambulance Co. Inks Deal To End Medicare Fraud Claims

    Two suburban Philadelphia ambulance companies have agreed to pay nearly half a million dollars to resolve claims that they billed the government for services despite their owner having lost his paramedic license for forging a doctor's signature.

  • July 10, 2019

    Bankrupt Philadelphia Hospital Floats Resident Program Sale

    Bankrupt hospital operator Center City Healthcare proposed a Chapter 11 sale of the 500-doctor residency programs at Hahnemann University Hospital late Tuesday, saying it had received a $7.5 million stalking horse bid from regional hospital owner Tower Health to take over the training systems from Hahnemann, which is slated to close this fall.

  • July 10, 2019

    Cozen O'Connor DQ'd Over Client Conflict In Cannabis Deal

    An Illinois state judge has disqualified Cozen O'Connor from representing a woman who is seeking to block several individuals from selling their majority stake in a medical marijuana dispensary to an outside company, as the firm has previously advised a parent company in Pennsylvania.

  • July 10, 2019

    3M Says Patient Attys' Sanctions Bid Over Docs Retaliatory

    3M Co. urged a Minnesota federal court Wednesday to deny a sanctions bid by lead attorneys representing patients in multidistrict litigation over the company's post-surgery patient warming device, saying the move amounts to retaliation against 3M’s own attempt to hold them in contempt for revealing sealed documents.

  • July 9, 2019

    5th Circ. Judges Question If ACA Can Stand Without Mandate

    The Fifth Circuit's conservative majority battered Affordable Care Act defenders with questions about how the law can survive without its individual mandate during a Tuesday hearing, expressing skepticism about overturning a Texas federal judge's decision to find the legislation unconstitutional without its penalty for avoiding health insurance.

  • July 9, 2019

    Okla. Says J&J Addiction Expert Is Just A 'Book Reviewer'

    An attorney for Oklahoma on Tuesday blasted Johnson & Johnson's latest expert in the state's trailblazing trial seeking to hold the drugmaker liable for the opioid crisis, saying the witness — a neuroscientist who testified that multiple studies show opioids have a very small risk of addiction — was like a "book reviewer" recapping studies he wasn't involved in.

  • July 9, 2019

    Fla. Medical Marijuana Statute Deemed Unconstitutional

    A Florida state appellate court ruled Tuesday that the state legislature's regulations for medical marijuana treatment centers are more restrictive than an amendment approved by voters envisioned, calling the statutory scheme unconstitutional.

  • July 9, 2019

    ND Med Merger Fight Dropped After 8th Circ. Ruling

    The Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday dropped its case challenging Sanford Health’s planned purchase of Mid Dakota Clinic PC after the companies decided to abandon the move last week.

  • July 9, 2019

    BioScrip Investor Wants Option Care Merger Vote Halted

    A BioScrip Inc. investor asked the Delaware Chancery Court on Tuesday for speedy consideration of his request that a shareholder vote on proposals to finalize a merger with another home infusion care provider be halted until more information is provided.

  • July 9, 2019

    Home Care Group Fights Calif. Union Contact Disclosure Law

    A newly effective California law letting unions request home care aides’ contact information is illegal because it infringes on territory covered by federal labor law, a business group has alleged in a new suit challenging the law.

Expert Analysis

  • 'Fair Workweek' May Be Coming Soon To Chicago

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    Unlike most of the "fair workweek" laws in other cities, Chicago's proposed predictable schedule ordinance is not limited to the retail, hospitality and food and beverage sectors, or to large businesses with a requisite number of locations or employees, says Daniel Pasternak of Squire Patton.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Ballard Spahr Diversity Chief Virginia Essandoh

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    In the final installment of this monthly series, legal recruiting expert Carlos Pauling from Major Lindsey & Africa talks with Virginia Essandoh about the trends and challenges she sees as chief diversity officer at Ballard Spahr.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McMahon On 'Roosevelt For The Defense'

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    In "Theodore Roosevelt for the Defense," authors Dan Abrams and David Fisher meticulously chronicle the forgotten high-profile 1915 libel trial of Teddy Roosevelt, capturing the interesting legal customs of an era before things like notice pleading and pretrial discovery, says Chief U.S. District Judge Colleen McMahon of the Southern District of New York.

  • The First Deference Ruling Of High Court Term

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    PDR Network v. Carlton & Harris is a Telephone Consumer Protection Act case, but the U.S. Supreme Court's decision last week drew some important battle lines over the broader question of agency deference, say Artin Betpera and David Carter of Womble Bond.

  • Occupational License Laws May Hurt Health Care Competition

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    Though occupational licensing regulations and scope-of-practice laws help to maintain health care quality, they may also increase barriers to entry, which reduces competition and exacerbates provider shortages and rising health care costs, say experts at Analysis Group.

  • Rohrmoos Highlights Steps To Securing Atty Fees In Texas

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    The contours of the Texas Supreme Court's decision in Rohrmoos Venture v. UTSW DVA Healthcare provide important clarifications, reminders and cautions regarding attorney fee claims — most importantly, that providing billing records is essentially indispensable, say attorneys at Jones Walker.

  • How A Procedural Misstep Can Invalidate IRS Penalties

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    The U.S. Tax Court’s recent determination in Romano-Murphy v. Commissioner, that failure to provide a preassessment hearing invalidated IRS penalties, highlights important distinctions between key functions and personnel within the IRS Office of Appeals, say Michael Chittenden and Michael Lloyd at Covington.

  • An Ethics And Compliance Punch List For Gov't Contractors

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    The U.S. Department of Justice recently reiterated that it will not tolerate government contractors that lack a required business and ethics compliance program. With consequences so high, now is the time for companies that have fallen behind to catch up, say Robert Tompkins and Rodney Perry at Holland & Knight.

  • Key Differences In Nev. And Calif. Data Privacy Laws

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    Nevada’s recently enacted Senate Bill 220 gives state residents a broad right to opt out of the sale of their personal information. Companies currently preparing for the California Consumer Privacy Act cannot assume that CCPA compliance equates to compliance with S.B. 220, say Sadia Mirza and Yanni Lin at Troutman Sanders.

  • A Look At China's New Cybersecurity Guidance

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    Businesses providing services over the internet are likely to face continued challenges to comply with the expanding implementation of China's cybersecurity law, especially with respect to broadening definitions of personal information holders under new guidance, say Xiaoyan Zhang and Vincent James Barbuto of Reed Smith.

  • How Purdue Opioid Win Could Bolster J&J In Okla. Trial

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    North Dakota's consumer fraud and public nuisance claims against opioid manufacturer Purdue Pharma were recently dismissed by a state court. The decision provides a framework for opioid defendants to challenge similar allegations in other jurisdictions, and may prove timely for Johnson & Johnson in its current Oklahoma trial, says Cameron Turner of Segal McCambridge.

  • Government Contractor Compliance: 1 Size Can’t Fit All

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    Contractors that do business with federal, state and local government entities face an interesting — and intensifying — predicament: How to develop a comprehensive yet straightforward compliance program that satisfies varying laws in varying jurisdictions, say Jeniffer Roberts and Katherine Veeder at Alston & Bird.

  • 5 Ways Law Firms Can Improve Their Job Interviews

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    When evaluating potential new hires, law firms should utilize structured interviews in order to create a consistent rating system that accurately and effectively assesses candidates' skills and competencies, says Jennifer Henderson of Major Lindsey.

  • Employer Options For White Collar Contractors After Dynamex

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    Though multiple worker classification questions still swirl around the California Supreme Court's Dynamex decision, many have wondered what it means for white collar independent contractors. The law is still murky on this point, but there are several steps that might help hiring companies rebut a misclassification claim, say Raymond Bertrand and James de Haan at Paul Hastings.

  • State Net

    State Efforts To Rein In Drug Costs Have Mixed Success

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    Reducing the soaring costs of commonly used prescription drugs has become a political priority in the nation’s statehouses. But thus far, states have done better at increasing transparency around drug pricing than at actually lowering prices, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

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