International Trade

  • July 12, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen an Allianz unit sue security outsourcers Serco Group and G4S, BGC Brokers continue its legal war against a rival firm accused of poaching traders and a Guernsey fund administrator drag a London borough into court. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • July 11, 2019

    Chinese Co. Hit With Preliminary Tariffs On Chemical Imports

    The U.S. Department of Commerce has slapped a Chinese producer of a water treatment compound with triple-digit tariffs after making an early finding that it sold the imports at unfairly low prices, according to a notice to be published Friday in the Federal Register.

  • July 11, 2019

    Vinson & Elkins Snags CFIUS Expert From Covington

    Vinson & Elkins LLP has scooped up an expert in cross-border investment from Covington & Burling LLP to head up the firm’s newly minted national security practice, the firm said on Tuesday.

  • July 11, 2019

    WTO Dispenses Of US-Mexico-Canada Metal Tariff Disputes

    The World Trade Organization on Thursday formally closed the book on four disputes between the U.S. and its North American neighbors that stemmed from the Trump administration's national security tariffs on imported steel and aluminum.

  • July 11, 2019

    USTR, Dems Making Headway On NAFTA 2.0 Labor Issues

    A group of House Democrats tasked with securing changes to the renegotiated North American Free Trade Agreement met with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer on Thursday and said they were making progress on improving the agreement's labor chapter.

  • July 11, 2019

    Investors Fight Cement Co.'s Bid To Pause $1B IPO Suit

    Investors in Loma Negra Corp. said Wednesday that the Argentine cement maker was simply forum-shopping by asking that their federal court suit over its $1 billion initial public offering be paused in favor of a state court action.

  • July 10, 2019

    SocGen Owes $792M Over Castro-Seized Bank, Heirs Say

    Heirs of a bank that was seized by Fidel Castro's government in 1960 — and then used as Cuba’s national bank — claimed in Florida federal court Wednesday that Société Générale SA ignored U.S. embargoes, profiting by doing business with the bank, and should pay back $792 million in damages.

  • July 10, 2019

    US Launches Investigation Of France's Digital Tax Plan

    The U.S. said Wednesday it had begun investigating France's planned 3% tax on large companies' digital revenue, invoking the same legal rationale as for President Donald Trump's trade and tariff restrictions against China.

  • July 10, 2019

    Trump Sizing Up India As New Trade Nemesis

    As the White House looks to cool its trade tensions with China and return to the negotiating table, President Donald Trump has set his sights on a new foil: India, which has found itself the target of a number of the administration's recent trade power plays.

  • July 10, 2019

    State Dept. Official Defends 'Emergency' Arms Sale

    A senior State Department official on Wednesday defended the Trump administration’s contentious move to push through $8.1 billion in foreign arms sales to the Middle East using "emergency" authority, amid a barrage of bipartisan criticism, but said there were no immediate plans for any similar move.

  • July 10, 2019

    Commerce Must Look At Pencil Importer's Unsolicited Reply

    The U.S. Court of International Trade on Tuesday kicked back the U.S. Department of Commerce's decision to impose tariffs on a domestic importer of pencils from China, telling the department to take another look at an unsolicited submission it had previously ignored.

  • July 10, 2019

    US Blacklists Lebanese Legislators, Official For Hezbollah Ties

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury has sanctioned two Lebanese lawmakers and a security official with ties to the country's terrorist group Hezbollah, warning on Tuesday that there is no distinction between the group’s political and military activities.

  • July 9, 2019

    EU Raises Hackles Over Hello Kitty, Fines Sanrio €6.2M

    The European Union's antitrust watchdog has hit Hello Kitty's intellectual property owner Sanrio with a €6.2 million ($6.95 million) fine for allegedly restricting sales of licensed merchandise among countries within the bloc.

  • July 9, 2019

    FCPA Policy Benefits Open To Repeat Bribery Offenders

    French oil conglomerate TechnipFMC was recently called out by the U.S. Department of Justice for one of its predecessor companies being a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act "recidivist," but the settlement shows that being a repeat offender doesn't block a company from getting cooperation and remediation credit.

  • July 9, 2019

    Investors Can't Add Card Transactions To Forex-Rigging Suit

    A New York federal judge ruled Tuesday that it is too late for investors accusing several big banks of rigging the foreign exchange market to add claims based on foreign credit, debit and ATM card transactions.

  • July 9, 2019

    American Wind Cos. Want Tariffs On Imported Wind Towers

    American wind tower companies have taken a beating from foreign wind tower producers selling their products in the U.S. at unfairly cheap prices, a coalition of U.S. producers alleged Tuesday, asking the U.S. government in a petition to level the playing field with tariffs.

  • July 9, 2019

    US Slaps Tariffs On Fabricated Steel From Mexico, China

    The U.S. will collect preliminary tariffs on fabricated structural steel imports from Mexico and China after the U.S. Commerce Department found Monday that exporters from these countries have benefited from unfair government subsidies.

  • July 9, 2019

    Can Data Solve BigLaw’s Diversity Problems?

    Even the most well-intentioned law firms can struggle to build and retain diverse teams. Those at the cutting edge are finding the answers could lie in their own internal data.

  • July 9, 2019

    12 Attorneys On How Diversity Gives Them The Edge

    Law360 asked lawyers how diverse backgrounds can be an advantage for them and their firms, and the answers poured in. Here are a dozen personal accounts of diversity at work.

  • July 9, 2019

    Russia Targets US Steel Duties In New WTO Case

    The Russian government has brought a World Trade Organization complaint against the U.S. over its tariffs on carbon-quality steel imported from Russia, the WTO said Tuesday.

  • July 9, 2019

    US Asks S. Korea To Play Fair In Antitrust Enforcement

    The Trump administration called on South Korea to even out its antitrust enforcement in a formal discussion Tuesday, as the U.S. contends the Korea Fair Trade Commission doesn't give American companies a fair shake in competition hearings.

  • July 9, 2019

    Former USTR General Counsel Returns To King & Spalding

    The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative's former general counsel, Stephen P. Vaughn, has rejoined King & Spalding in its international trade practice group after spending two years as the USTR's top attorney, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • July 9, 2019

    HP Vendor Seeks Sanctions For 'Objectively Frivolous' Claims

    A vendor for Hewlett Packard has shot back at allegations that it forged invoices to smuggle electronic equipment into certain Latin American countries to avoid duties on the exports, telling a Florida federal judge that sanctions are warranted in light of the "objectively frivolous" claims.

  • July 9, 2019

    Huawei Still On Blacklist After US-China Ceasefire

    Chinese telecom giant Huawei remains on a U.S. government blacklist more than a week after President Donald Trump announced that concessions would be made for the company, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Tuesday as the U.S. and China prepared to relaunch their formal trade negotiations.

  • July 8, 2019

    Split 9th Circ. Won't Undo Revival Of Nestle 'Slave Labor' Suit

    Eight judges dissented in a split Ninth Circuit ruling that declined an en banc rehearing of a panel’s revival of a proposed class action brought by alleged victims of human trafficking who accuse Nestle and Cargill of abetting child slavery on African cocoa farms by paying off slave owners.

Expert Analysis

  • A Dramatic 6 Months For OFAC Sanctions Enforcement

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    Through the first half of 2019, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control strengthened country-based sanctions programs, including those targeting Venezuela and Cuba, and brought a string of aggressive enforcement actions that suggest enhanced compliance program expectations going forward, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Ballard Spahr Diversity Chief Virginia Essandoh

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    In the final installment of this monthly series, legal recruiting expert Carlos Pauling from Major Lindsey & Africa talks with Virginia Essandoh about the trends and challenges she sees as chief diversity officer at Ballard Spahr.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McMahon On 'Roosevelt For The Defense'

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    In "Theodore Roosevelt for the Defense," authors Dan Abrams and David Fisher meticulously chronicle the forgotten high-profile 1915 libel trial of Teddy Roosevelt, capturing the interesting legal customs of an era before things like notice pleading and pretrial discovery, says Chief U.S. District Judge Colleen McMahon of the Southern District of New York.

  • Walmart's DOJ Deal Evinces New Corporate Monitoring Policy

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    Walmart's agreement last week with the U.S. Department of Justice to resolve alleged Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations provides the most meaningful example yet of how the agency intends to implement its new policy on corporate monitors, say attorneys at Vinson & Elkins.

  • Anti-Terrorism Act Case Could Bring New Risks For US Cos.

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    In D.C. federal court, Atchley v. AstraZeneca could expand liability under the Anti-Terrorist Act in a novel and far-reaching way, based on the plaintiffs' theory that corporations' transactions with foreign governments help finance terrorist attacks, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • How New US M&A Restrictions On China Will Affect Tech Cos.

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    The Trump administration recently launched an unprecedented regulatory blitz designed to further protect domestic information and communications technology and services from what it considers Chinese threats. These steps will constrain transactions that could expand China’s access to the U.S. market and to U.S. technology — and some have an immediate effect, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • DOJ's Citgo Case Highlights Reach, And Limits, Of FCPA

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    The bribes a Miami businessman recently admitted paying to executives of gasoline retailer Citgo violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, because Citgo is owned by the Venezuelan government. But there is scant case law for the U.S. Department of Justice to rely on in a case against Citgo itself, says Timothy Belevetz of Ice Miller.

  • 5 Ways Law Firms Can Improve Their Job Interviews

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    When evaluating potential new hires, law firms should utilize structured interviews in order to create a consistent rating system that accurately and effectively assesses candidates' skills and competencies, says Jennifer Henderson of Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Fateful Phone Call

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    When I was growing up, my mother was always the more mild-mannered parent. But during a trans-Atlantic phone call in 1991, when I told her I wanted to go to culinary school instead of law school, she started yelling — at a volume I had never heard from her, says Jason Brookner of Gray Reed.

  • Law Firms Can Do Better With Their Mentoring Programs

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    There are a few practical, proactive steps law firms can take to create a mentoring program that pays dividends — instead of creating a mediocre program that both parties see as an obligation, says Kate Sheikh of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • The Latest Developments In Criminal Cases Against Execs

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    This spring, there was some noteworthy news in white collar government investigations impacting executives, including the first successful prosecution in the opioid bribery scheme and the first criminal charges for failure to report under the Consumer Product Safety Act, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

  • 'Rocket Docket' Justifies Its Name For 11th Straight Year

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    The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia “rocket docket” is still the fastest federal civil trial court in the country despite some recent trends causing its median time to trial to grow to 13.2 months, says Robert Tata of Hunton.

  • Opinion

    FARA Enforcement Is No Slam-Dunk For Prosecutors

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    What support is there for the government’s recent theories of criminal liability under the Foreign Agents Registration Act? There are two possibilities, neither of which stands up to scrutiny, says Jay Nanavati of Kostelanetz & Fink.

  • 5 Key Issues In Acquiring Transportation Infrastructure Assets

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    There is a growing trend of governmental agencies contracting and leasing viable operating transportation infrastructure assets. Such opportunities for the private sector may exist in connection with any contemplated upgrade, extension or other modification of an asset that a governmental entity needs to finance, say José Morán and Juan Gonzalez of Baker McKenzie. 

  • China's Amended Investment Law Leaves Some Details Vague

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    China's recently amended Foreign Investment Law promises outside investors a more stable, transparent and predictable investment environment in China. But concerns remain that the law was rushed through to ease trade tensions, and that some of its provisions are not clearly defined, says Yuanyou Yang of Duane Morris.

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