International Trade

  • June 21, 2022

    Fed. Circ.'s New COVID Rules Let More Attend Arguments

    The Federal Circuit has revised its COVID-19 protocols to increase the number of people allowed at in-person arguments, about a week after the Washington, D.C., appellate court expanded the kinds of testing it would accept from lawyers who plan to argue in person.

  • June 21, 2022

    Garland Pledges War Crimes Aid In Surprise Ukraine Visit

    Attorney General Merrick Garland made a surprise visit to Ukraine on Tuesday, tapping a federal prosecutor known for hunting down former Nazis to help Kyiv investigate Russian war criminals.

  • June 21, 2022

    Atty Says Feds Destroyed Evidence, Wants FCPA Case Tossed

    An attorney charged in an $84 million bribery scheme argued in Massachusetts federal court that the charge against him should be dropped on the eve of trial after the FBI destroyed evidence that could have cast doubt on his guilt and also wiped clean any record of what happened to the proof in question.

  • June 21, 2022

    Importers, USTR Wrestle Over Deadline In China Tariff Case

    A group of importers challenging tariffs on more than $300 billion worth of Chinese goods slammed the government's request for more time to assess public comments on those levies Tuesday, urging the U.S. Court of International Trade to take a hard line.

  • June 21, 2022

    Justices Won't Take On German Car Antitrust MDL

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday refused to consider U.S. car dealerships' bid to revive their antitrust allegations accusing German auto manufacturers of conspiring to control diesel emissions system specifications.

  • June 21, 2022

    Build-A-Bear Loses Lawsuit Over Fluffed Toy Custom Duties

    An appellate court refused on Tuesday to overturn a finding on tax classification rules that prevent Build-A-Bear from claiming that some accessories sold with its toys in the U.K. are duty free.

  • June 21, 2022

    Irish Central Bank Reminds Trade Bodies Of Sanctions Duties

    The Irish central bank has sent a letter to the country's trade bodies reminding them of their obligations to enforce European Union sanctions against Russia and Belarus for the invasion of Ukraine.

  • June 17, 2022

    The Law360 400: Tracking The Largest US Law Firms

    As the legal market adjusted to pressures of a global pandemic and saw demand for complex legal services soar, many law firms spent 2021 locked in a fierce war for talent to meet ever-expanding client needs.

  • June 17, 2022

    Will BigLaw Regret Its Hiring Spree As The Economy Softens?

    The largest 200 law firms in the U.S. boosted their headcount by an average of 5.6% in 2021 — the steepest increase in five years, according to the Law360 400. Here's a look at what those numbers mean and where firms may be headed if the economy slows in the coming year.

  • June 20, 2022

    At Federal Circuit, ITC Backs Phillip Morris Import Ban

    Lawyers from the U.S. International Trade Commission are telling judges on the Federal Circuit to reject a legal bid by Philip Morris International and Altria to beat a ban on bringing its IQOS-branded products into the U.S. after they were found to be knockoffs.

  • June 20, 2022

    EU Extends Crimean Annexation Sanctions By Another Year

    The EU said Monday it will extend its sanctions against Russia for the 2014 annexation of Crimea and Sevastopol until June 2023 after President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said Ukraine faces "greater hostile activity" from Russia as war continues to rip through the country.

  • June 17, 2022

    WTO Vax Patent Deal Seen As Doing Little To Boost Access

    The World Trade Organization's narrow agreement allowing developing countries to authorize the use of patents for COVID-19 vaccines has dismayed both supporters and opponents of waiving intellectual property rights amid the pandemic, and attorneys say its impact on vaccine access will be limited.

  • June 17, 2022

    MD Helicopters Gets $210M Ch. 11 Sale Liftoff In Del. Court

    Former Lynn Tilton-led MD Helicopters Inc. secured a Delaware bankruptcy judge's approval Friday for a $210 million debt-for-equity sale to a creditor group, overcoming the Dutch government's objection that the deal wrongly excluded a $16.1 million judgment lien it won in an Arizona court.

  • June 17, 2022

    Ex-Trump Aide Navarro Can't Delay Trial Due To His Book Tour

    A D.C. federal judge on Friday scheduled a November trial date for former Trump White House trade adviser Peter Navarro's contempt of Congress criminal case and rejected his defense team's request for a delay until April 2023 to avoid interfering with the promotion of Navarro's forthcoming book.

  • June 17, 2022

    Sberbank Developing SWIFT Alternative After Ban

    The head of Russia's largest bank said Friday that it is building an alternative to SWIFT, the international messaging network for cross-border payments, after it was banned from the system in response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

  • June 17, 2022

    Ukraine's EU Membership Bid Gets Commission Backing

    The European Commission formally endorsed Ukraine's application on Friday for European Union membership, giving the war-torn country candidate status pending approval of all 27 governments in the bloc at their June 23 summit.

  • June 16, 2022

    WTO Inks Deals On Fisheries, Vaccines After Lengthy Session

    World Trade Organization members unveiled a new package of trade accords late Thursday following a marathon negotiating session, headlined by deals to create flexible intellectual property rules covering COVID-19 vaccines and curtail global fishing subsidies.

  • June 16, 2022

    Shifty Ransomware Crews Spark Sanctions Concerns

    A recent trend of cybercriminals attempting to mislead targets about their identities has made matters more difficult for attack victims tasked with deciding quickly whether a ransomware payout might breach government sanctions, industry attorneys say.

  • June 16, 2022

    7th Circ. Says Tariff Whistleblower Wasn't Wrongly Fired

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday ruled that a former senior global trade and customs manager for a Wisconsin-based window cover manufacturer was not unlawfully fired for her stance that the company owed higher tariffs for certain fabrics originating from China.

  • June 16, 2022

    5th Circ. Told Law Barring Israel Boycotts Harms Free Speech

    A Texas-based engineering firm told the Fifth Circuit a lower court properly blocked enforcement of a Texas law prohibiting the state government from contracting with companies opposed to doing business with Israel because the law violates its constitutional right to engage in political boycotts.

  • June 16, 2022

    Ark. Prof Gets 1 Year For Lying To FBI About China Patents

    A former University of Arkansas chemical engineering professor targeted in a controversial Trump-era counterespionage initiative was sentenced to a year and a day in prison Thursday for lying to the FBI about patents he held in China.

  • June 16, 2022

    US Producers Lose Bid To Up Brazilian Molding Duties

    The U.S. Court of International Trade denied a domestic producer group's bid to issue anti-dumping duties on wood moldings and millwork products from Brazil, affirming the U.S. Department of Commerce's earlier decision to spare the producers from levies on the goods.

  • June 16, 2022

    Salvage Co. Ends Cross-Claim Against Golden Ray Shipowner

    A Texas salvage and wreck removal company on Wednesday dismissed without prejudice its cross-claim against the owner of a large vehicle carrier that capsized off the coast of Georgia in 2019, in a pollution-related case brought by a Georgia county.

  • June 16, 2022

    UAE Trader Blames Sanctions For Unpaid €47M Oil Debt

    A UAE-based trader has insisted that sanctions imposed on Russia after its invasion of Ukraine prevented it from paying €47.4 million ($49.3 million) still owed under a deal for crude oil with Lukoil's Swiss trading arm, arguing payment of the debt would now be unlawful.

  • June 15, 2022

    Amazon, Cartier Accuse Chinese Group of Counterfeit Scam

    Online retail giant Amazon.com Inc. and luxury jeweler Cartier International AG filed a pair of trademark infringement lawsuits in Washington federal court Wednesday that accuse a group of Chinese entities and a Handan, China-based social media influencer of running a sophisticated scheme to sell counterfeit Cartier jewelry online.

Expert Analysis

  • How In-House Legal Leaders Can Drive Corporate Growth

    Author Photo

    Today, more executives are seeking legal leaders who are strategic, adaptable thinkers, making it essential that in-house counsel get out of their comfort zone of legal advice and take several steps to contribute toward revenue growth and raise their profile, says Tim Parilla at LinkSquares.

  • ITC Precedent On Standing May Warrant A Second Look

    Author Photo

    A recent initial determination to terminate a U.S. International Trade Commission investigation related to a computer patent begs the question of whether ITC precedent is correct and if the commission could have handled the issue of standing more effectively, says Scott Daniels at Xsensus.

  • Attorneys Should Tread Carefully On Job Counteroffers

    Author Photo

    Promises of more compensation to keep attorneys from leaving their jobs have become commonplace in today's hot job market, but lawyers should weigh their options carefully as accepting a counteroffer can negatively affect their reputation, says Leeron Molloy at VOYlegal.

  • Series

    The Future Of Legal Ops: Time To Get Serious About Data

    Author Photo

    Most corporate legal departments collect surface-level data around their operations, such as costs and time to resolution, but legal leaders should explore more in-depth data gathering to assess how effective an attorney was, how efficiently legal work was performed, and more, says Andy Krebs at Intel.

  • Opinion

    ABA Isn't Giving Up On Diversity Efforts By Ending CLE Rule

    Author Photo

    While some view the American Bar Association’s elimination of continuing legal education diversity requirements as capitulating to a Florida Supreme Court decision against the mandate, it was a strategic decision to serve Florida members while improving diversity, equity and inclusion efforts in other ways, says Tiffani Lee at Holland & Knight.

  • Lateral Candidate Screening Steps To Prevent Bad Behavior

    Author Photo

    Bullying and harassment are among the root causes of stress, anxiety and substance abuse in the legal profession, so law firms should take four actions to effectively screen lateral candidates and ensure they are not recruiting individuals who could jeopardize the well-being of their people, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • How Russia Sanctions Are Affecting Compliance

    Author Photo

    The wide-ranging sanctions and export controls that the U.S. and its partners have imposed on Russia in recent months pose complex compliance challenges for commercial operations, investments and financial transactions, even when there is not a direct or obvious nexus with Russia, say Anthony Rapa and Matthew Thomas at Blank Rome.

  • A Look At The Legal Profession Since Murder Of George Floyd

    Author Photo

    Little has changed for Black attorneys since law firms promised to combat discrimination within the profession following George Floyd's murder, but on this second anniversary of his death, law firms can recommit by adopting specific strategies that set their Black lawyers up for success, say Lisa Davis and Khasim Lockhart at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • Opinion

    NY Ruling Correctly Deems Legal Finance Docs Irrelevant

    Author Photo

    A New York appeals court's recent decision in Worldview Entertainment v. Woodrow joins a growing trend of decisions denying discovery of litigation funding documents, highlighting that commercial legal finance should be treated just like any other financing in commercial litigation, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • Export Compliance Tips For Patenting Dual-Use Tech

    Author Photo

    The war in Ukraine has highlighted the increasingly subtle differences between commercial and military technologies, and should remind patent practitioners working on dual-use technologies to consider export control laws and focus on civilian end use, say Grant Ehrlich and Maggie Russell at Cantor Colburn.

  • Overcommunicate With Your Summer Associates This Year

    Author Photo

    2022 summer associates have had limited opportunities for professional interactions due to the pandemic, so supervising attorneys should prioritize intentional overcommunication by emphasizing importance of tone and content of emails, sharing feedback immediately, and more, says Julie Schrager at Faegre Drinker.

  • Commerce Tariff Memo Helps Dispel Clouds For US Solar Cos.

    Author Photo

    Solar suppliers and developers face numerous uncertainties due to the U.S. Department of Commerce's investigation into whether photovoltaic cells imported from Southeast Asian countries are circumventing anti-dumping and countervailing duty orders against cells from China — but a recent department memorandum provides some clarification, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Nev. Case Highlights Settlement Authority Dilemmas For Cos.

    Author Photo

    A Nevada federal court's recent decision in Ceja v. The Vons Companies illustrates the pitfalls of misinterpreting a court order requiring a representative with full settlement authority to be present at negotiations, and is a reminder to consider that courts differ as to what full settlement authority means in practice, says Richard Mason at MasonADR.

  • Unpacking OFAC's New Russian Accounting Services Ban

    Author Photo

    New determinations issued by the Office of Foreign Assets Control put a broad swath of accounting, trust and corporate formation, management consulting, legal service providers, and others at heightened risk for strict liability sanctions violations for dealings with Russia, requiring affected entities to update their procedures, say Cari Stinebower and Dainia Jabaji at Winston & Strawn.

  • The Fastest Federal Trial Courts: A Look At Virginia, Florida

    Author Photo

    The Eastern District of Virginia rocket docket and the Northern District of Florida were last year’s fastest civil trial courts in the nation, and interviews with two of their judges reveal they have some of the same practices to keep litigation moving efficiently, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the International Trade archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!