Business of Law

  • October 11, 2019

    A Diverse Legal Bench Starts From Within, Judges Say

    When it comes to diversifying the nation’s judicial bench, those in a unique position to help make it more diverse are the people who currently sit on the dais, judges and judicial experts said during a recent event.

  • October 11, 2019

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    California's attorney general released long-awaited draft regulations on how companies should implement the state's consumer privacy law, and President Donald Trump signed executive orders that require agencies to publish all informal guidance and limit its use in enforcement. These are some of the stories in corporate legal news you may have missed in the past week.​

  • October 11, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week has seen asset manager BlueCrest drag a U.S. hedge fund into court following its expansion into the U.K., a City watchdog sue a Panamanian connected to an illegal land sale scheme and a Hong Kong food distributor file suit against shipping giant MSC. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • October 10, 2019

    Buckley Co-Founder Retired Amid Misconduct Probe: Suit

    An insurer for Buckley LLP is seeking to avoid paying the law firm's $6 million claim for a "loss of key employee" following the departure of co-founder Andy Sandler, arguing in a lawsuit that coverage is unavailable because the firm failed to disclose on its insurance application that it was investigating allegations of misconduct by Sandler shortly before his retirement.

  • October 10, 2019

    Newsom OKs Calif.'s First Atty Dues Increase In 20 Years

    California Gov. Gavin Newsom has given the State Bar of California the green light to charge attorneys nearly 30% more — an additional $123 — in licensing dues in 2020, the first increase in more than two decades.

  • October 10, 2019

    Changes To LSAT Included In Blind Man's Disability Settlement

    The organization that administers the Law School Admission Test will overhaul the section that assesses analytical reasoning as part of an agreement to end a suit brought by a blind prospective law student, who claimed the section discriminates against visually impaired exam takers.

  • October 10, 2019

    Attorney Says She Was Pushed And Injured By ICE Officers

    An immigration attorney is seeking damages in a lawsuit filed Thursday, accusing two Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers of pushing her as she tried to accompany a 3-year-old child to a detention facility to be reunited with his mother before both were to be deported.

  • October 10, 2019

    PIMCO Atty Slams 'Fraternity Culture' In Discrimination Suit

    A Pacific Investment Management Co. in-house attorney says the firm's "fraternity culture" routinely discriminates against women — particularly women of color — while promoting and advancing the interests of white men, according to a suit filed in California state court.

  • October 10, 2019

    Amid Turmoil, Nissan Names New Legal Head

    Nissan Motor Co. Ltd. has replaced its legal department head, who cooperated with Japanese prosecutors before the 2018 arrest of the company's former chairman amid misconduct claims, with a longtime executive of the business, the automaker said this week.

  • October 10, 2019

    Law360's The Term: Gorsuch Surprises On Title VII

    On this episode of The Term, the team breaks down the U.S. Supreme Court’s first full week in session for the 2019-2020 term, including some surprises during oral arguments about discrimination protections for LGBTQ workers.

  • October 10, 2019

    Trump Ordered To Give Dems More Bush-Era Kavanaugh Docs

    A D.C. federal judge ordered the Trump administration on Thursday to nearly double the number of records it's providing per month to Senate Democrats seeking documents related to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh's tenure in the George W. Bush White House.

  • October 10, 2019

    Former Pfizer In-House Atty New GC At Cannabis Brand

    California cannabis brand Lowell Herb Co. announced Thursday the appointment of Stacey Hallerman, who previously worked for Pfizer and the luxury goods holding company Richemont, to the position of general counsel and chief administrative officer.

  • October 10, 2019

    Law360's Weekly Verdict: Legal Lions & Lambs

    Quinn Emanuel reigned supreme this week on the legal lions list, winning a Second Circuit opinion allowing its clients to engage in extraterritorial discovery, while Morgan Lewis ended up among the legal lambs after its client Johnson & Johnson was hit with an $8 billion product liability verdict.

  • October 10, 2019

    Court Sees Breach But No Damages In Miami Firm Dissolution

    A Florida state judge has ruled that three former Ehrenstein Charbonneau Calderín partners are entitled to collect attorney fees for litigation with their former partner over the Miami boutique's 2018 breakup, despite concluding that they breached their operating agreement by unilaterally dissolving the firm.

  • October 10, 2019

    Ex-Quinn Emanuel Partner Opens Boutique Firm In London

    A former Quinn Emanuel white collar partner who left the BigLaw firm earlier this year has launched a London-based boutique shop specializing in financial crime and compliance.

  • October 10, 2019

    DLA Piper's Arbitration Policy Draws Fire From Law Students

    A Harvard Law School student activist group is ratcheting up pressure on DLA Piper to nix its mandatory arbitration program after a female partner accused the BigLaw giant of punishing her because she reported being sexually assaulted by a practice group leader.

  • October 10, 2019

    Giuliani Associates Get Bail After Campaign Finance Arrests

    Two associates of President Donald Trump's lawyer Rudy Giuliani were granted bail Thursday after being charged with campaign finance violations alongside two other men in an indictment that alleges attempts to gain influence in the U.S. for Ukrainian officials and a Russian businessman.

  • October 09, 2019

    Strine Calls For Sweeping Corporate Overhaul As Term Wanes

    With only a few weeks left in an eventful two decades on the nationally important Delaware bench, retiring Chief Justice Leo E. Strine Jr. has called for a sweeping overhaul of American corporate governance, aimed at countering what he sees as failures to expand long-term investment, sustainable business practices and fair sharing of gains with workers.

  • October 09, 2019

    Supreme Court Cheat Sheet: 9 Cases To Watch

    Nothing says Fall is here quite like the start of a new U.S. Supreme Court term. Here are the major cases that could mean big changes for the business world.

  • October 09, 2019

    Split Trial Likely In Dentons' $10M Fee Fight With Guinea

    A long-stalled suit filed by Dentons more than five years ago seeking $10 million in fees from the Republic of Guinea got a jump-start Wednesday when a federal judge told lawyers to come up with potential trial dates as early as this winter.

  • October 09, 2019

    EY Law Leads Big 4 Among Global Alternative Legal Brands

    The Big Four accounting firms are continuing to make gains as the most well-known alternative legal service brands around the world, with EY Law eclipsing PwC as the strongest brand not from a law firm, according to a survey released Wednesday by London research firm Acritas.

  • October 09, 2019

    Jones Day Pans 'Inflammatory' Allegations In Sex Bias Suit

    The latest version of a gender discrimination suit by female former Jones Day associates tacks on allegations that range from being “redundant” to “merely inflammatory," the BigLaw powerhouse said, urging a D.C. federal judge to pare down their proposed class and collective action. 

  • October 09, 2019

    Law Firm Leaders: Wolf Greenfield's Tim Oyer

    Tim Oyer has served as president and managing partner of intellectual property boutique Wolf Greenfield since 2007. He spoke to Law360 about how the firm recruits scientists to the practice of law and his mantra when it comes to finding and retaining talent.

  • October 08, 2019

    Sen. Harris Criticizes DLA Piper's Forced Arbitration Policy

    Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., on Tuesday criticized DLA Piper, where her husband is a partner, over the firm's policy of requiring employees to arbitrate employment-based legal claims, after an attorney for an accuser urged the presidential candidate to condemn the practice.

  • October 08, 2019

    Feeling The Pain From A Divided Supreme Court Ruling

    What happens when a majority of the U.S. Supreme Court justices can’t agree? Law360 takes you inside the fallout of a plurality ruling.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: Steps Toward A Supportive Firm Culture

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    As an early advocate of the American Bar Association's year-old well-being pledge, we launched an integrated program to create and sustain a supportive workplace culture with initiatives focused on raising mental health awareness, embracing creativity and giving back to the community, says Casey Ryan at Reed Smith.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: Mental Health Education As A Firm Priority

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    Our firm drives a holistic concept of well-being through educational opportunities, such as a series of expert-led workshops intended to address mental health and substance abuse issues that we vowed to fight when we signed the American Bar Association's well-being pledge one year ago, says Krista Logelin at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: A Firm's Work With Mental Health Experts

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    Signing the American Bar Association's well-being pledge last year was a natural progression of our firm's commitment to employee wellness, which has included developing partnerships with professionals in the mental health space to provide customized programming to firm attorneys and staff, say Annette Sciallo and Mark Goldberg at Latham.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: When A Firm Brings Counseling On Site

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    One year ago, our firm signed the American Bar Association's well-being pledge and embraced a commitment to providing on-site behavioral health resources, which has since become a key aspect of our well-being program, say Meg Meserole and Kimberly Merkel at Akin Gump.

  • Series

    Pursuing Wellness: Inside A Firm Meditation Program

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    After our firm signed the American Bar Association’s well-being pledge one year ago, we launched two key programs that included weekly meditation sessions and monthly on-site chair massages to help people address both the mental and physical aspects of working at a law firm, says Marci Eisenstein at Schiff Hardin.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Offers Map For Avoiding Daily Rate OT Claims

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    At first glance, it's no surprise that in U.S. Shale Solutions v. Faludi the Fifth Circuit rejected overtime claims from a highly compensated lawyer turned consultant, but the facts of the case and the court’s analysis provide guidance on whether daily rates can give rise to overtime lawsuits, says Debra Friedman at Cozen O’Connor.

  • Early Sampling Of Electronic Info Is Underutilized In Discovery

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    The early and prompt provision of samples from all electronically stored information sources as a part of ESI protocol search methodology is consistent with the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and may allow for significant cost savings during discovery, says Zachary Caplan at Berger Montague.

  • The Factors Courts Consider In Deposition Location Disputes

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    In the absence of a federal rule governing deposition location, federal courts are frequently called on to resolve objections to out-of-state deposition notices. Recent decisions reveal what information is crucial to courts in making the determination, says Kevin O’Brien at Porter Wright.

  • What To Consider Before Filing For A Rule 57 Speedy Hearing

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    Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 57 and its state counterparts provide a method for expediting claims for declaratory judgment that warrants closer attention than it has historically received from litigants and courts, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Expanding The Meaning Of Diversity

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    My conservative, Catholic parents never skipped a beat when accepting that I was gay, and encouraged me to follow my dreams wherever they might lead. But I did not expect they would lead to the law, until I met an inspiring college professor, says James Holmes of Clyde & Co.

  • Discovery Counsel Vital In All Phases Of Mass Tort Litigation

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    Experienced discovery counsel helps the virtual law team shape case strategy and provides necessary advocacy, consistency and efficiency, plus cost savings, from the beginning of a case through trial, say attorneys at Nelson Mullins and FaegreBD.

  • How The Wayback Machine Can Strengthen Your Case

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    The Wayback Machine, which archives screenshots of websites at particular points in time, can be an invaluable tool in litigation, but attorneys need to follow a few simple steps early in the discovery process to increase the odds of being able to use materials obtained from the archive, says Timothy Freeman of Tanenbaum Keale.

  • Opinion

    Draft Civil Procedure Jurisdictional Rule Needs A Tweak

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    The Judicial Conference Advisory Committee’s proposed addition to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 7.1 needs to be amended slightly to prevent late-stage jurisdictional confusion in cases where the parties do not have attributed citizenship, says GianCarlo Canaparo at The Heritage Foundation.

  • New Insights On Privilege, Ethics Duties For In-House Attys

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    A New York federal court's recent decision in Fischman v. Mitsubishi Chemical Holdings dispels the notion that in-house legal advisers are prohibited from using information about their employers in pursuing discrimination claims against them, says Jessica Westerman at Katz Marshall.

  • New Best Practices Under E-Discovery Spoliation Rule

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    The amended Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 37(e) provides explicit criteria for imposing sanctions when electronically stored information has been lost during discovery, but courts are still not consistently applying the new rule, with some simply ignoring it in favor of inherent authority, say Matthew Hamilton and Donna Fisher at Pepper Hamilton.

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