Business of Law

  • August 05, 2020

    Law Firm Leaders: Kelley Kronenberg's Michael Fichtel

    Michael J. Fichtel arrived at Kelley Kronenberg right after gaining admission to the Florida Bar in 1987. What was then a boutique firm focused on workers' compensation defense has grown in size and breadth since then, including in the last decade under his leadership as CEO.

  • August 05, 2020

    Philly Bar Association Endorses Limited Diploma Privilege

    In a split with statewide bar leaders, the Philadelphia Bar Association on Wednesday threw its support behind a limited plan to allow this year's crop of law school graduates to temporarily begin practicing law without taking the bar exam, as a result of the ongoing threat of the coronavirus pandemic.

  • August 05, 2020

    Ex-Cooley Atty Charged In UK Corruption Plot

    A former Cooley attorney and his wife, an international anti-corruption expert, have been charged in connection with an alleged five-year corruption plot following an investigation by the Metropolitan Police's economic crime unit.

  • August 04, 2020

    Katten Cuts Back On Coronavirus Salary Reductions

    Four months after implementing salary reductions, Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP has walked back those cuts by half for all impacted attorneys and staff, the firm confirmed Tuesday. 

  • August 04, 2020

    Chicago's Chief Federal Judge Appoints Diversity Committee

    The chief judge of Chicago's federal court announced Tuesday that she's appointed a committee of outside lawyers to examine the court's racial diversity and help identify ways the court can overcome any barriers to providing equal justice to everyone.

  • August 04, 2020

    Meet The ABA's New President: Patricia Lee Refo

    The American Bar Association swore in Snell & Wilmer partner Patricia Lee "Trish" Refo as its president at the end of its annual meeting Tuesday. Here, Refo discusses her goals for the organization, lessons learned from the annual meeting, and how the ABA is working to assist the legal profession during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • August 04, 2020

    Ex-MSU Recruiter Suit A 'Collateral Attack,' Coach's Atty Says

    A lawsuit from an ex-Michigan State University football recruiter targeting counsel for the team's head coach is an impermissible "collateral attack" on a previous federal litigation in which the recruiter and his attorney were cited for misconduct, according to a Tuesday motion.

  • August 04, 2020

    Bressler Enters Texas With Ballard & Littlefield Merger

    New Jersey-based Bressler Amery & Ross has merged with Texas boutique firm Ballard & Littlefield LLP, opening offices in Houston and Dallas in its first expansion west of the Mississippi River.

  • August 04, 2020

    InterDigital Blasts 'Intertwined' Attys In Lenovo SEP Row

    InterDigital has urged a Delaware federal judge to reject a trade association's proposed amicus brief in an IP licensing fight Lenovo is waging against the company, arguing that the brief is a backdoor attempt by Lenovo to cram in additional arguments and make assertions that would contradict ones made in other litigation.

  • August 04, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    Legal and enforcement battles related to the COVID-19 pandemic raged this week with cases continuing to surge in various regions, as the East Coast states divided their time between responding to the pandemic and preparing for Tropical Storm Isaias. 

  • August 04, 2020

    Jones Day's Bid To Toss Family Leave Suit Faces Wary Judge

    The married ex-Jones Day associates claiming the firm's family leave policy discriminates against fathers appeared likely to survive the legal powerhouse's bid to dismiss their lawsuit after a D.C. federal judge expressed skepticism Tuesday and suggested discovery might have to take place.

  • August 04, 2020

    Coronavirus Q&A: Hunton's Health Practice Leader

    In this edition of Coronavirus Q&A, the leader of Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP's health practice discusses a severe financial squeeze on hospital law departments, how the pandemic can help doctors persuade patients to make lifestyle changes, and why COVID-19 relief funds will complicate hospital mergers and acquisitions.

  • August 04, 2020

    ABA Urges States To Halt In-Person Exams During Pandemic

    State bar admission authorities should cancel all in-person bar exams until the coronavirus pandemic subsides and instead consider other options like online tests or diploma privilege, the American Bar Association said in a resolution passed on Tuesday that met with some opposition.

  • August 04, 2020

    Ex-Goldman Atty Joins Libra Member Bison Trails As First GC

    Blockchain infrastructure company and Libra Association member Bison Trails Co. has tapped a former Goldman Sachs attorney as its first general counsel, Bison Trails announced Tuesday.

  • August 04, 2020

    Mass. Courts Plan To Ease Into Jury Trials As Backlog Grows

    Massachusetts state courts are getting creative but remaining cautious as they look to resume live jury proceedings while the coronavirus pandemic remains a major public safety threat, unveiling a multiphase plan Tuesday that could start with a mock trial this month and may include some unusual venues.

  • August 03, 2020

    Judge Says Socially Distanced Trial Was 'A Thing Of Beauty'

    Northern California state Judge Samuel McAdam has a glowing review of his experience last month bringing jurors back after a monthslong break to resume a personal injury trial, in his Sacramento-area court's first civil jury action since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

  • August 03, 2020

    Client Control Is Key In ABA's New Litigation Funding Advice

    As lawyers increasingly rely on outside entities to fund litigation, they must make sure the client continues to have the final say in matters of whether to drop a case or continue litigating it, according to American Bar Association best practices for third-party litigation funding that were adopted on Monday.

  • August 03, 2020

    Murkowski Says No Supreme Court Confirmation In 2020

    In the first public break from the Senate majority leader's vow to fill any U.S. Supreme Court vacancy that arises in 2020, Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski has said it's too late in a presidential election year for a high court confirmation.

  • August 03, 2020

    'Frustrated' Judge Balks At Ex-Jones Day Attys' 'Delay Tactic'

    A D.C. federal judge on Monday tossed a bid for additional discovery by three female former Jones Day attorneys in a blockbuster pay discrimination proposed class action, saying their request was too broad, but he nevertheless gave them a chance to narrow their demands.

  • August 03, 2020

    Mass. Court Won't Use 'Grandfathering,' Citing 'Racist Origins'

    The Massachusetts Appeals Court said in an opinion over a zoning dispute Monday that it would not use the term "grandfathering" due to its "racist origins" in laws that prevented Black people from voting after the Civil War.

  • August 03, 2020

    Ga. Walks Back Plan For In-Person Grand Juries Amid Virus

    The head of the Georgia Judicial Council on Monday walked back his plan to resume grand jury proceedings amid the coronavirus pandemic, citing the state's high infection rate and low comfort level among court staff and participants for in-person events.

  • August 03, 2020

    The Top In-House Hires Of July

    Legal department hires during July included high-profile appointments at Pacific Gas and Electric, U.S. Soccer and Coca-Cola. Here, Law360 looks at some of the top in-house announcements from the past few weeks.

  • August 03, 2020

    Sen. Hawley's Lonely Stand On Roe v. Wade Litmus Test

    A Republican senator has announced he'll follow his own formal litmus test on abortion for U.S. Supreme Court nominees, promising to vote against any pick who has not "explicitly acknowledged that Roe v. Wade was wrongly decided," but leading conservative activists have denounced his approach.

  • August 03, 2020

    Texas Bar Dues Requirement Is Constitutional, 5th Circ. Hears

    The board of directors for the State Bar of Texas has hit back against a challenge to the bar's mandatory dues, telling the Fifth Circuit a trial court judge was correct to say the dues passed constitutional muster under a 30-year-old Supreme Court decision.

  • August 03, 2020

    15 Minutes With Morehouse College's General Counsel

    Morehouse College's recent announcement to continue with virtual learning for the fall semester during the ongoing pandemic was not an easy choice, said general counsel Joy White. Here, she explains more about the decision and its impacts at the historically Black men's college, and how she has adjusted to working from home.

Expert Analysis

  • Cybersecurity Steps For Law Firms Amid Heightened Risks

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    With large swaths of the population indoors and primarily online, cybercriminals will be able to exploit law firms more easily now than ever before, but some basic precautions can help, says Joel Wallenstrom at Wickr.

  • Opinion

    It's Time For Law Firms To Support Work-From-Home Culture

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    Now that law firms are on board with fully remote work environments, they must develop policies that match in-office culture and align partner and associate expectations, says Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • Opinion

    Republicans Keep Confirming Unqualified Judicial Nominees

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    What emerges from the group of 200 federal judges confirmed by the Senate under President Donald Trump is a judiciary stacked with young conservative ideologues, many of whom lack basic judicial qualifications, says Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

  • Tips For Crafting The Perfect Law Firm Alert

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    As lawyers have had more time to write in recent weeks, the number of law firm alerts has increased massively, but a lot of them fail to capture readers and deliver new business, says Richard Torrenzano at The Torrenzano Group.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Elrod Reviews 'Shortlisted'

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    Renee Knake Jefferson and Hannah Brenner Johnson's new book, "Shortlisted: Women in the Shadows of the Supreme Court," is a service to an overlooked group of nine women who were considered for the U.S. Supreme Court before Justice Sandra Day O'Connor was confirmed, and offers constructive tips for women looking to break through the glass ceiling, says Fifth Circuit Judge Jennifer Elrod.

  • Mandatory State Bars Likely To Remain Intact, For Now

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    A Texas federal judge’s recent holding in McDonald v. Sorrels that mandatory bar memberships do not violate members' constitutional rights indicates that such requirements survive the U.S. Supreme Court's 2018 decision in Janus, but it may mean that the Supreme Court will address the issue in the not-too-distant future, say Majed Nachawati and Misty Farris at Fears Nachawati.

  • The Law Behind The Strange Departure Of US Atty Berman

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    In the wake of this weekend's confusing, contradicting statements regarding the removal of Geoffrey Berman as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, it is useful to ask what law governs here, why the standoff with Attorney General William Barr ended the way it did, and what history teaches us about these circumstances, says Daniel Levy at McKool Smith.

  • 11 Keys To Success At Remote Mediation

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    Attorneys should accept that remote mediation may be their only current option for resolving a dispute and take steps to obtain a fantastic outcome for their clients, including making sure the right people attend the remote mediation and beginning the session with an apology, says Eric Meyer at FisherBroyles.

  • Pandemic Could Bring Student Exodus From Legal Profession

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    A recent survey shows that law and prelaw students have serious concerns about the quality and value of remotely provided legal education, and rapid action from the legal community is necessary to prevent promising young people from leaving in favor of other professions, says Mehran Ebadolahi at TestMax.

  • The Privilege Implications Of Using Online Collaboration Tools

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    While few courts have addressed the attorney-client privilege or work-product doctrine in the context of online collaboration tools, existing case law supports five best practices as organizations increasingly use these tools in the COVID-19 era, say Christopher Campbell and Marcus Sandifer at DLA Piper.

  • Confronting Mental Distress In The Legal Profession

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    Even before the pandemic, troubling data about mental distress among lawyers pointed to a profession in crisis, but addressing the challenge requires a better understanding of the causes, says Jonathan Prokup at Cigna Corp.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Finance Investments Are Not Risk-Free Loans

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    The Ninth Circuit's certification order last week in Fast Trak v. Sax presents an important opportunity for the New York high court to affirm the consensus among courts — litigation finance transactions are not loans subject to usury laws, say Wendie Childress and William Marra at Validity Finance.

  • Opinion

    How White Privilege Helped Me Succeed In BigLaw

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    The white, male power structure has eased the path for lawyers like me for far too long, and we should now be responsible for dismantling this systemic bias within the legal industry, says Scott McLaughlin at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Keys To A Thriving Biz Development Culture At Your Law Firm

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    As law firms continue to experience the economic impact of the COVID-19 crisis, it is more important than ever that they reduce reliance on just a few rainmakers and foster a culture that makes business development a way of life for everyone — from junior associates to senior partners, says Elise Holtzman at The Lawyer's Edge.

  • How Video Mediation Can Help Us Serve Clients Better

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    Mediation in recent years has largely devolved into a kind of arbitration without due process — where a mediator reads briefs, decides where the case should settle, and drives parties toward that single-minded result — but online mediation can be steered in a different direction, says mediator Jeff Kichaven.

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