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Business of Law

  • September 11, 2018

    $250M State Farm Deal Could Spur More Campaign Cash Suits

    The eye-popping $250 million that State Farm will pay to settle claims it rigged an Illinois judicial election to overturn a $1 billion class action verdict likely will spur copycat suits over judicial campaign donations and the blurry lines of influence they yield, experts say.

  • September 11, 2018

    Ex-King & Spalding Associate's Atty Let Out Of Firing Suit

    A New York federal judge on Tuesday let an attorney cease representing an ex-King & Spalding LLP associate the attorney has accused of dodging bills and refusing his advice on how to handle an unfair-termination suit against the firm.

  • September 10, 2018

    After Kavanaugh's Rough Week, Grassley Seeks Sept. 20 Vote

    With the Senate Judiciary Committee set to move forward on D.C. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court, experts are starting to take stock of a bruising week of testimony that touched on executive power, abortion, gun control and more but left his audience wondering how he would rule from the bench.

  • September 10, 2018

    Can BigLaw Avoid Another Associate Purge?

    The legal industry has shown some caution in rebuilding its pool of associates after the dramatic layoffs of thousands during the last recession. But have firms done enough to survive the next?

  • September 10, 2018

    Man Accused Of Killing Mayer Brown Atty Faces 80 Counts

    An 80-count indictment against the man accused of fatally shooting Stephen Shapiro, the founder of Mayer Brown's Supreme Court practice, and threatening to kill the attorney's wife adds dozens of new charges including home invasion, residential burglary, aggravated discharge of a firearm and aggravated unlawful restraint, according to state prosecutors.

  • September 10, 2018

    Firms Sign 'Well-Being Pledge' To Address Atty Mental Health

    More than a dozen of the country’s largest law firms have pledged to enact a set of new policies designed to address substance abuse and mental health issues within their ranks, the American Bar Association announced on Monday.

  • September 10, 2018

    Litigation Funder Vannin Capital Plans $91M IPO

    Litigation funder Vannin Capital on Monday unveiled plans to float on the London Stock Exchange in a £70 million ($91.2 million) initial public offering, the same day it announced that a former Allen & Overy LLP senior partner has joined the firm as its newest chairman.

  • September 10, 2018

    Texas SG To Step Down, Join Baker Botts' DC Office

    Texas has a new top appellate lawyer, the state’s attorney general said Monday as he announced that Solicitor General Scott Keller — who has argued 11 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court in three and a half years — is leaving government service to rejoin Baker Botts LLP in the firm’s Washington, D.C., office.

  • September 10, 2018

    15 Minutes With Meals On Wheels America’s CLO

    Robert T. Herbolsheimer has been involved with Meals on Wheels America since the mid-1990s, when he first started providing pro bono legal services to the national association dedicated to addressing senior isolation and hunger. He recently detailed the challenges faced by the organization, the aspects that inspire him and the meal he would choose if he were only allowed one option for the rest of his life.

  • September 7, 2018

    Law360's Pro Say: Kavanaugh Takes On Capitol Hill

    Congress held confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh this week that included drama over documents, protests, and plenty of talk about big issues like abortion and gun control. D.C. reporter Michael Macagnone, who was on the scene for the hearings, comes on the show to give us an inside look at the action.

  • September 7, 2018

    In Case You Missed It: Hottest Firms And Stories On Law360

    For those who missed out, here's a look back at the law firms, stories and expert analyses that generated the most buzz on Law360 last week.

  • September 7, 2018

    Fox Rothschild Sues Miss America Org Over Legal Tab

    Fox Rothschild LLP has sued the Miss America Organization in New Jersey state court, revealing the law firm’s less-than-pretty fight with the pageant producers over allegedly unpaid legal bills.

  • September 7, 2018

    Some Experts Tout, Others Trash Kavanaugh To Close Hearing

    D.C. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh moved closer Friday to being confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court after legal experts argued for and against the longtime jurist at the close of an at-times rowdy weeklong hearing.

  • September 7, 2018

    ITC Judge Who Presided Over IP Probes Retires

    A U.S. International Trade Commission administrative law judge who oversaw intellectual property-related investigations involving unfair trade practices has left the enforcement agency after nearly seven years, the ITC said on Friday.

  • September 7, 2018

    Holland & Knight's Philly Arrival May Boost Market's Allure

    The head of Holland & Knight LLP's new Philadelphia office says the firm's recent expansion into the city's crowded legal market came only after careful consideration of client needs and broader growth plans, but industry watchers believe the move could spark renewed interest in the City of Brotherly Love as a destination for out-of-town shops.

  • September 7, 2018

    Litigation Funder Adds 8 In UK With An Eye On Group Claims

    Litigation funder Augusta Ventures has boosted its London team with a string of high-profile hires from firms like Hogan Lovells, Eversheds Sutherland and Hausfeld LLP as it signaled plans to pursue larger-scale cases.

  • September 7, 2018

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    A survey found the legal industry suffers from an "endemic" gender and racial bias that favors white men, and Warner Bros. rolled out a companywide policy that strives to ensure greater participation in film and television projects from groups that have been historically underrepresented in the entertainment industry. These are some of the stories in corporate legal news you may have missed in the past week.

  • September 7, 2018

    Legal Sector Continues Slide With 1,500 Jobs Lost In August

    The legal services sector experienced another setback on the job front in August, shedding 1,500 jobs after dropping nearly double that amount the month before, a report released Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed.

  • September 6, 2018

    New Emails Reveal Kavanaugh As Opinionated Bush Lawyer

    In previously confidential records released Thursday, D.C. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh called an affirmative action program a "naked racial set-aside," discussed whether Roe v. Wade is "settled law" and corresponded with a Republican Hill staffer later accused of misappropriating Democratic material while he was a White House lawyer in the early 2000s.

  • September 6, 2018

    Kavanaugh Defends Bush Record, Words On Executive Power

    D.C. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh found himself defending his statements on executive power and involvement in controversial Bush administration judicial nominees and policies Thursday, as he closed out his testimony for his U.S. Supreme Court nomination hearing.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: My RBG Guide To Judging

    Goodwin Liu

    I clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the days of RBG bobbleheads and “You Can’t Spell Truth Without Ruth” T-shirts. I had no idea I would become a judge, and I feel lucky every day that I had the chance to learn from her, says California Supreme Court Justice Goodwin Liu.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 Things I Learned

    Judge John Owens

    A lot has changed since I clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg 20 years ago. At that time, I had hair and no wife. I also thought I knew everything — but working for the justice made me realize very quickly that I actually knew very little, says Ninth Circuit Judge John Owens.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: The Equality Lessons

    Margo Schlanger

    In 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court, and I began my two-year clerkship with her. In her first opinion as a justice, and in dozens since, Justice Ginsburg reminded us how the law needs to operate if equality is to be a reality, says Margo Schlanger, a professor at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • Opinion

    Kavanaugh Is The Wrong Choice To Check Autocratic Power

    David Driesen

    In light of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on the Trump administration's travel ban, the appointment of Brett Kavanaugh to the high court could further jeopardize our democracy. Kavanaugh’s deference to executive authority may embolden a president inclined to use national security rationales to restrict freedom, says David Driesen, a professor at Syracuse University College of Law.

  • NY Commercial Division Backs Technology-Assisted Review

    Elizabeth Sacksteder

    Neither the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure nor most state procedure codes expressly address whether, in what circumstances, or how a party may use technology-assisted review to fulfill its disclosure obligations. A new rule introduced last week by the Commercial Division of the New York Supreme Court aims to fill that gap, say Elizabeth Sacksteder and Ross Gotler of Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP.

  • The Future Of Authenticating Audio And Video Evidence

    Jonathan Mraunac

    The recent emergence of artificial intelligence-based technology has prompted serious concerns about the future integrity of recordings. Attorneys must think critically about standards for authenticating audio and video evidence as well as legislative and regulatory safeguards to discourage pervasive manipulation and forgery, says Jonathan Mraunac of Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • Opinion

    Law360's Global 20 Doesn't Acknowledge Global Networks

    Glenn Cunningham

    While I read with interest Law360's report analyzing the top 20 global law firms of 2018, I also noticed it doesn't tell the whole story. Global networks of independent law firms compare favorably with multinational firms in terms of geographic coverage, legal expertise, and awareness of local cultures and customs, says Glenn Cunningham of Interlaw Ltd.

  • Time For Sunshine On 3rd-Party Litigation Funding

    Mary Novacheck

    On July 1, Wisconsin became the first state to require disclosure of third-party litigation financing contingent on the outcome of cases. Individual states' and courts' efforts to shed more light on such funding arrangements are an inconsistent patchwork. The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure should be revised to require such disclosure nationwide, says Mary Novacheck of Bowman and Brooke LLP.

  • Opinion

    Broken Norms Should End Business-As-Usual Nominations

    Neera Tanden

    As we saw with the outcry over Yale Law School's statement about U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, too many in the liberal legal profession still cling to an old view of the rules and norms. Their reputations are now being weaponized on behalf of a judge who has questioned a president's accountability to legal constraints, says Neera Tanden, president and CEO of the Center for American Progress.

  • Guest Feature

    Chris Dodd Talks Dodd-Frank, Nuremberg Trial, Hollywood

    Randy Maniloff

    Attorney Randy Maniloff recently sat down with former Sen. Christopher Dodd at his new office at Arnold & Porter in Washington, D.C. The goal? To discover things we might not know about the author of some of the most important legislation of the last few decades.