Business of Law

  • September 30, 2021

    Biden's DOJ Antitrust Pick Kanter Headed For Senate Hearing

    Jonathan Kanter, the White House nominee for U.S. Department of Justice antitrust chief, will appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee for a confirmation hearing on Wednesday, the panel has announced.

  • September 30, 2021

    County Settles Negligence Case Over Judge Accused Of Rape

    The U.S. Department of Justice brokered a settlement with a Washington county it said failed to stop sexual misconduct by a former county judge who was arrested two years ago on charges he raped a deputy clerk in his chambers.

  • September 30, 2021

    Civil Rights Lawyers Among 10 New Picks For Federal Courts

    President Joe Biden on Thursday announced 10 new nominees for seats on the federal trial courts and touted the diverse personal and legal backgrounds of the picks, who include three with Asian American or Pacific Islander heritage as well as two Hispanic and two Black individuals.

  • September 30, 2021

    ENRC Has Lost Privilege Over Graft Reports, SFO Says

    ENRC cannot prevent the Serious Fraud Office from using formerly confidential reports that detail suspected corruption if it ever brings criminal charges against the Kazakh mining giant, counsel for the agency told a London court on Thursday.

  • September 30, 2021

    Justices To Review Law Firm's Day-Late Tax Challenge

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Thursday it will hear an appeal over whether the U.S. Tax Court had the authority to consider a North Dakota law firm's day-late challenge to a tax levy from the Internal Revenue Service.

  • September 29, 2021

    Senators Spar Over Supreme Court's Use Of 'Shadow Docket'

    Senate Democrats criticized the U.S. Supreme Court's recent use of the so-called shadow docket in a contentious hearing Wednesday, saying it was a crisis undermining the legitimacy of the court. But Republicans countered that even holding the hearing on the issue was tantamount to an effort to intimidate the justices.

  • September 29, 2021

    Use Of GRE In Law Admissions Needs More Study, ABA Told

    The results of a nonprofit group's 2018 study of the predictive value of the Graduation Record Examination for law school applicants is insufficient for the American Bar Association to say that institutions can successfully use the GRE and the Law School Admission Test interchangeably in admissions, according to an independent review of the report. 

  • September 29, 2021

    Discipline Referral Not Ripe For Appeal, Amicus Tells DC Circ.

    A Mohrman Kaardal & Erickson PA partner cannot yet challenge a district court's order referring him to a disciplinary panel over his role in a pro-Trump election lawsuit because the referral isn't an appealable final decision, a Vinson & Elkins LLP attorney tapped as amicus curiae has told the D.C. Circuit.

  • September 29, 2021

    ACC Report Shows Jump In Counsel Pay In 2021 Vs. 2020

    The Association of Corporate Counsel released a new compensation report Wednesday showing that the average in-house counsel in small legal departments received significantly higher base salary, incentives, and total cash compensation in 2021 than last year.

  • September 29, 2021

    Sidley Austin Snags 3 Former FDA Attys From Hogan Lovells

    Sidley Austin LLP has lured three new partners, all former U.S. Food and Drug Administration attorneys, from Hogan Lovells for its global health care and FDA practice, the latest in a slew of hirings for the firm's life sciences sector in recent years, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • September 29, 2021

    With Sentencing, Donziger Legal Saga To Enter New Phase

    On Friday morning, Steven Donziger will appear at the federal courthouse in downtown Manhattan, where U.S. District Judge Loretta Preska will decide if he'll go to jail for flouting court orders.

  • September 29, 2021

    Willkie Opens London Arbitration Practice With BigLaw Hires

    Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP has launched a new international arbitration practice in London with six attorney recruits from WilmerHale, including one partner, continuing the firm's expansion of its dispute resolution services, Willkie announced Wednesday.

  • September 29, 2021

    Hispanic Attys Say Opportunities Key To Boosting Diversity

    Anna María Tejada was a baby when her mother received legal status to live in the U.S., a pivotal moment Tejada marks as where her story as an attorney starts, and why she knows the importance of the law and representation. Tejada and other legal movers and shakers spoke with Law360 Pulse about how the industry should focus its diversity efforts.

  • September 29, 2021

    Mishcon Debuts Hong Kong Office As It Mulls IPO

    British firm Mishcon de Reya will open an office in Hong Kong in partnership with local law firm Karas LLP to handle high-profile corporate disputes, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • September 29, 2021

    SFO Denies Using ENRC's Privileged Info During Graft Probe

    The Serious Fraud Office on Wednesday denied using Eurasian Natural Resources Corp.'s legally privileged information during its criminal corruption investigation into the Kazakh miner, dismissing the allegations at a London trial as "just suspicion and speculation."

  • September 28, 2021

    Judiciary Says Oklahoma Needs More Judges After McGirt

    Oklahoma federal court is in desperate need of five more judges to handle the increased criminal caseload created by the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark McGirt decision that declared a large swath of the state Indian Country, according to the Judicial Conference of the United States.

  • September 28, 2021

    3 Judges Sent Home As NY Court Vax Mandate Kicks In

    New York state court administrators on Tuesday sent "a number" of employees home as it was reported that 333 workers, including three judges, were out of compliance after they failed to meet COVID-19 vaccination requirements.

  • September 28, 2021

    Attorney Founder Of Litigation Finance Outfit Cops To Fraud

    The founder of bankrupt New York litigation finance companies Cash4Cases Inc. and Liberty Bridge Capital Management LP admitted Tuesday to defrauding investors by stealing funds and double-pledging the same lawsuit winnings to multiple investors as collateral.

  • September 28, 2021

    Wolf Haldenstein, Landlord Denied Early Wins In Rent Dispute

    A New York state judge on Tuesday declined to side with either Wolf Haldenstein Adler Freeman & Herz LLP or its landlord in a rent dispute, saying a jury should decide whether the firm waived its right to seek abatements by moving into a partially renovated office.

  • September 28, 2021

    LeClairRyan Founder Slams Trustee's Conspiracy Claims

    A founding partner of now-defunct LeClairRyan PLLC is firing back at new claims by the firm's Chapter 7 trustee that he played a part in a conspiracy with legal services provider UnitedLex and other entities that resulted in the law firm's bankruptcy.

  • September 28, 2021

    Ex-Treasury Dept. GC Tapped As Citi's Top Atty

    Citigroup Inc. has hired former U.S. Treasury Department general counsel Brent McIntosh as its new top attorney and corporate secretary.

  • September 28, 2021

    Clifford Chance Delays America Offices Reopening To January

    Clifford Chance LLP on Monday informed employees in its America offices it will delay its formal return to office until the week of Jan. 10, the firm confirmed to Law360 on Tuesday.

  • September 28, 2021

    Slaughter And May Picks M&A Guru As Future Top Partner

    Slaughter and May has elected Roland Turnill, a longtime partner with experience advising major multinational companies in high-stake mergers and acquisitions, to be the firm's next senior partner. He will step into the new role in May 2024, the firm said in a statement Tuesday.

  • September 28, 2021

    2 BigLaw Partners Among Biden's Latest US Atty Picks

    Michael F. Easley Jr., a litigation partner at McGuireWoods, and Cole Finegan, a managing partner at Hogan Lovells, were among nine U.S. attorney nominees President Joe Biden announced Tuesday.

  • September 28, 2021

    Gerrard Put Whistleblower Above Client, Atty Admits

    Neil Gerrard should have warned Eurasian Natural Resources Corp. that its compliance chief had been compelled to give evidence against the Kazakh miner but instead placed the interests of his "friend" ahead of his client's, counsel for the retired Dechert LLP partner acknowledged Tuesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Firms Should Use Surveys To Make Smart Legal Tech Choices

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    The utility of legal technology innovations may be limited without clear data and objectives from the outset, but targeted surveys can provide specific insights that enable law firms to adopt the most appropriate and efficient tech solutions, says Tim Scott at Frogslayer.

  • Don't Forget Due Diligence In Race For Lateral Associate Hires

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    Amid high demand for associates and aggressive competition to attract talent, law firms should take three key steps to conduct meaningful prehire due diligence and safeguard against lateral hiring mistakes that can hurt their revenue and reputation, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • Lessons In Civility From The Alex Oh Sanctions Controversy

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    Alex Oh’s abrupt departure from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and admonishment by a D.C. federal judge over conduct in an Exxon human rights case demonstrate three major costs of incivility to lawyers, and highlight the importance of teaching civility in law school, says David Grenardo at St. Mary's University.

  • Opinion

    Biz Record Admissibility Rule Must Adapt To An ESI World

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    The federal rule that permits the use of business records as evidence must be amended to address the unreliability of electronically stored information and inconsistent court frameworks on email admissibility, say Josh Sohn and Nadia Zivkov at Stroock.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Rodriguez Reviews 'When Machines Can Be Judge'

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    Katherine Forrest's new book, "When Machines Can Be Judge, Jury, and Executioner," raises valid transparency concerns about artificial intelligence tools used by judges when making bail and sentencing decisions, but her argument that such tools should be rejected outright is less than convincing, says U.S. District Judge Xavier Rodriguez of the Western District of Texas.

  • 5 Steps For Law Firms Rethinking Flexible Work Post-COVID

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    A flexible work environment will be key to recruiting and retention efforts post-pandemic, so law firms must develop comprehensive policies that solidify expectations and boundaries on accommodations such as flextime, remote work and reduced hours, says Manar Morales at the Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • Judge's Rebuke Of Mass. AG Has Lessons For All Attorneys

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    A Massachusetts federal judge’s recent rebuke of the state Attorney General’s Office for refusing to respond to discovery requests in Alliance for Automotive Innovation v. Healey highlights six important considerations for attorneys who want to avoid the dreaded benchslap, say Alison Eggers and Dallin Wilson at Seyfarth.  

  • Font Considerations To Give Your Legal Briefs An Edge

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    Following the D.C. Circuit’s recent notice discouraging use of the font Garamond in legal briefs, Jason Steed at Kilpatrick looks at typeface requirements and preferences in appellate courts across the country, and how practitioners can score a few extra brief-writing points with typography.

  • Make Profitability Management Part Of Your Law Firm Culture

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    As the legal industry continues to change in the post-pandemic world, law firms should adapt to client demands by constantly measuring and managing the profitability of their services, says Joseph Altonji at LawVision.

  • 4 Trends In Discoverability Of Litigation Funding Documents

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    Recent rulings shed light on how courts and international arbitration tribunals decide if litigation funding materials are discoverable and reaffirm best practices that attorneys should follow when communicating with funders, say Justin Maleson at Longford Capital and Michele Slachetka and Christian Plummer at Jenner & Block.

  • How Immigration Ruling May Change Removal Proceedings

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Niz-Chavez v. Barr decision decisively resolves the circuit split over whether a noncompliant notice to appear can trigger an Immigration and Nationality Act timing provision, but less clear is the impact the ruling will have on motions to reopen or terminate removal proceedings, says Kevin A. Gregg at Kurzban Kurzban.

  • 7 Lessons For Young Lawyers Starting Their Careers

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    This year's law graduates and other young attorneys must recognize that the practice of law tests and rewards different skills and characteristics than law school, and that what makes a lawyer valuable changes over time, says Vernon Winters, retired partner at Sidley.

  • The Pandemic's Bright Spots For Lawyers Who Are Parents

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    The COVID-19 crisis has allowed lawyers to hone remote advocacy strategies and effectively represent clients with minimal travel — abilities that have benefited working parents and should be utilized long after the pandemic is over, says Chelsea Loughran at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Opinion

    Revise Mansfield Diversity Mandates To Also Benefit Veterans

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    The well-intentioned efforts and salutary purposes of the legal industry's Mansfield Rule diversity metric are tainted by the Diversity Lab initiative's omission of veterans, who are underrepresented at large law firms and entitled to advantageous treatment based on more than 200 years of public policy, says Robert Redmond at McGuireWoods.

  • Bankruptcy Litigation Could See More Third-Party Funding

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    The next few years could be an opportune time for bankruptcy litigants to capitalize on the advantages of third-party financing as the obstacles to its use — including attorney ethics issues and prohibitions against champerty — seem to be clearing at a slow but steady pace, say Daniel Simon and Natalie Rowles at McDermott.

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