Business of Law

  • June 25, 2019

    Thornton Atty Admits To 'Stupid Mistake' In State Street Case

    The managing partner at Thornton Law Firm testified in Boston federal court Tuesday that he signed a false declaration in support of attorney fees without ever reading it in full, saying he made a "stupid mistake" in a $300 million class action settlement with State Street in which the billing practices of three firms have been called into question.

  • June 25, 2019

    Greg Craig, Prosecutors Spar Over FARA Trial Evidence

    With a summer trial date looming, former Skadden partner Gregory Craig and federal prosecutors on Monday each sought to limit the opposition's evidence arsenals as Craig fights charges that he lied to national security officials about overseas work done at the behest of Paul Manafort.

  • June 25, 2019

    New Fla. Bar Prez Wants Action On Legal Tech Regulations

    Vero Beach litigator John M. Stewart will step up as Florida Bar president Friday for a one-year term in which he plans to move forward with regulations on how technology can be used in the legal space while protecting the public.

  • June 25, 2019

    Jones Day Accusers Reveal Identities In Sex Bias Suit

    Three of four former Jones Day attorneys who anonymously accused the firm of discrimination revealed their names late Monday in an amended complaint that deepens their claims that the legal giant mistreats women, especially mothers.

  • June 24, 2019

    $75M Fee Award In State Street Row Faces Judge's Scrutiny

    A Boston federal judge heard arguments Monday on whether to reduce a $75 million attorney fee award for three firms that brokered a $300 million class action settlement with State Street Corp., saying the firms may have misled him about how fees are typically calculated in massive deals like this one.

  • June 24, 2019

    Baker McKenzie Enacts Plan To Make More Women Partners

    Starting immediately, Baker McKenzie is updating its hiring and promotion processes to create equal opportunities for women and nonbinary people, aiming to have a diverse staff of 40% women, 40% men and 20% "flexible" — comprising nonbinary people, women or men — by July 1, 2025.

  • June 24, 2019

    Facebook Uses Data To Name Law Firm 'Diversity Champion'

    Facebook has been closely monitoring the actions 40 of its outside law firms have taken to create more diverse legal teams, and the company recently recognized one firm for its "dedication to diversity" based on the data on its outside counsel that it has collected.

  • June 24, 2019

    Cooley Snags Key Mueller Prosecutor Andrew Goldstein

    Former special counsel prosecutor Andrew Goldstein will join Cooley LLP as a litigation partner in its Washington, D.C., and New York City offices, the firm announced Monday.

  • June 24, 2019

    Companies Forecast Reduced In-House Legal Spending

    Most companies expect to reduce their legal function costs over the next two years, according to the results of a survey published Monday, with 42% of respondents planning on doing so by more than 10% in the face of challenges such as lawyers' mounting salaries.

  • June 24, 2019

    Arnold & Porter Adds High Court Pro As DC Appellate Head

    A veteran appeals litigator and former top government lawyer who has argued nine times before the U.S. Supreme Court has joined Arnold & Porter to helm the firm’s Washington, D.C., appellate and high court team, the firm announced Monday.

  • June 24, 2019

    15 Minutes With Smucker's General Counsel

    While the 122-year-old J.M. Smucker Co. has evolved to meet the changing demands of consumers, it simultaneously has maintained its commitment to five core beliefs, a feat that can be difficult for companies that have acquired other businesses, general counsel Jeannette Knudsen said in a recent interview with Law360.

  • June 24, 2019

    Why Your GC Could Be The Best Point Person In A Crisis

    Decisions by Boeing and other companies to move their longtime general counsel into special positions advising CEOs and boards are unusual, but make sense if management needs a point person to help navigate a crisis — or wants legal advice removed from the daily companywide obligations of a general counsel, experts say.

  • June 24, 2019

    Supreme Court Will Hear Case Over Copyrights To Legal Texts

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear a case about the extent to which state and local governments can claim copyright control over legal texts.

  • June 21, 2019

    Former High-Ranking Mueller Prosecutor Joins Paul Weiss

    Jeannie Rhee, a former leading prosecutor on special counsel Robert Mueller’s team, has joined Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP as a partner in the litigation department, the firm announced Friday.

  • June 21, 2019

    Legal Experts Recommend Supreme Court Ethics Code

    Democratic members of a House Judiciary subcommittee and several legal experts recommended establishing a code of ethics for U.S. Supreme Court justices during a hearing Friday, as a way to promote greater transparency and accountability for the justices.

  • June 21, 2019

    Lawmakers Want To Know How Tech Cos. Hire Diverse Attys

    A group of Democratic lawmakers on Friday asked Amazon, Apple, Microsoft and other top tech companies to provide Congress with detailed information on their policies and procedures for retaining outside attorneys of diverse backgrounds.

  • June 21, 2019

    Stare De-Crisis? Justices Battle Over Respect For Precedent

    Rising tensions among the U.S. Supreme Court justices over the principle of stare decisis, or respect for precedent, spilled into view again Friday as Justice Elena Kagan blasted her conservative colleagues for upsetting Fifth Amendment principles dating back to the 1800s.

  • June 21, 2019

    Amazon Studios Atty Joins Sex Bias Suit Against Jones Day

    An in-house Amazon Studios attorney and former Jones Day associate has sought to be included in a $200 million proposed class and collective action that contends the BigLaw firm discriminates against women.

  • June 21, 2019

    Law360's Pro Say: Alex Jones' Very Bad Week

    This week a Connecticut judge sanctioned media personality Alex Jones over threats to lawyers in a defamation case related to the Sandy Hook school shooting. The sanctions cap off a convoluted set of events that are almost too strange to believe, and we'll break it all down on this week's Pro Say podcast.

  • June 21, 2019

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    Facebook's new cryptocurrency has raised questions about how financial regulators will act, a survey found European general counsel are shifting the management of legal ops to others, and a report showed the gender pay gap is among the biggest obstacles to equality in law. These are some of the stories in corporate legal news you may have missed in the past week.​

  • June 21, 2019

    Where Have All The Legal Secretaries Gone?

    Law firm staffing has experienced a radical transformation in the past decade, and among the biggest changes has been a dramatic decrease in the ratio of legal secretaries to attorneys. Yet while their numbers may have dwindled, secretaries are now doing a wider array of work than ever before.

  • June 20, 2019

    Posner Throws Support Behind Litigation Finance Firm

    Retired Seventh Circuit Judge Richard Posner, widely considered one of the most influential legal thinkers of the past half-century, has joined San Francisco litigation finance firm Legalist as an adviser, the startup said Thursday.

  • June 20, 2019

    Latham's Madrid Office Head, Ex-DLA Piper Co-Chair, Dies

    Juan Picón, the "extraordinary" head of Latham & Watkins LLP's Madrid office and former global co-chair of DLA Piper, died Wednesday not long after being diagnosed with lymphoma, his firm said. He would have turned 55 on Sunday.

  • June 20, 2019

    Should Judges Tweet? 'Absolutely Not,' Retired Judge Warns

    Retired California Supreme Court Justice Carlos Roberto Moreno told sitting judges attending an event at University of California, Berkeley School of Law on Wednesday that they should “absolutely not” tweet.

  • June 20, 2019

    The 'Administrative State' Lives To Fight Another Day

    Conservatives had hoped the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Gundy v. U.S. would strike a major blow to the so-called administrative state by reviving the long-dormant nondelegation doctrine. While the court refused to do so, the fight is far from over.

Expert Analysis

  • Keeping PR Strategy Communications Privileged: Part 1

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    Companies faced with high-profile litigation often turn to public relations firms to help defend their reputations and maintain shareholder confidence. But recent cases are a reminder that internal PR firm documents face uncertain privilege protection, even when those documents are generated in support of a broader legal strategy, says Jeffrey Schomig of WilmerHale.

  • What Lawyers Can Do To Prevent And Combat Burnout

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    Lawyer burnout has been called a “romantic disorder” because it is characteristic of a work ethic admired in the legal culture. But the negative impacts of burnout are real and lawyers need to recognize the signs and solutions, says Jennifer Gibbs of Zelle LLP.

  • Opinion

    Law Schools Should Be More Like Medical Centers

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    Medical centers and their faculty matter to the practice of medicine. Law schools and their faculty do not matter to the practice of law, says J.B. Heaton of J.B. Heaton PC.

  • Opinion

    Courts Are Getting It Right On Litigation Funding Discovery

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    Earlier this month, a California federal court denied discovery into the identification of third-party funders with a financial interest in the outcome of an underlying patent infringement action. This decision in MLC v. Micron follows a long line of well-reasoned precedent across U.S. federal courts, say Matthew Harrison and Sarah Jacobson of Bentham IMF.

  • Settlement Counsel Key For Efficient Mass Tort Resolution

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    Team-based specialization in mass tort litigation defense allows each member to draw on individual strengths, maximizing their contribution. A core tenet of this approach is using settlement counsel to focus on strategic initiatives and end-game resolution efforts, separate from the heated battle lines of the litigation, say attorneys at Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • Diversity's Next Step: Developing Minority Partners

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    The lack of minority partners comes at a high cost to firms, say attorneys at Lightfoot Franklin & White LLC, as they suggest several practical ways to tackle this problem.

  • Arbitrators And Mediators Should Reflect Society's Diversity

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    Alternative dispute resolution providers have made great strides toward diversity, but recent statistics show there is still work to be done. There are certain steps ADR providers can take to actively recruit more women and minority candidates to serve as arbitrators and mediators, says James Jenkins of the American Arbitration Association.

  • Why AFAs Are Key To The Future Of Legal Practice

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    Alternative fee agreements can help align law firm and client interests, increase efficiency and eliminate corporate extortion, among other benefits. They are the best thing to happen to the practice of law in decades, says Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul at Dinsmore & Shohl LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Barron Reviews 'The Clamor Of Lawyers'

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    Can lawyers lead a revolution? According to "The Clamor of Lawyers: The American Revolution and Crisis in the Legal Profession" — a slim but elegant volume by Peter Charles Hoffer and Williamjames Hull Hoffer — they can and they did, says First Circuit Judge David Barron.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Lawyer-Directed Litigation Funding In NY: Part 2

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    Lawyer-directed nonrecourse litigation funding is more likely to protect a lawyer's exercise of independent professional judgment than traditional means of litigation finance, and furthermore enables worthwhile cases that otherwise could not be funded, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Lawyer-Directed Litigation Funding In NY: Part 1

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    Contrary to what the New York City Bar Association concluded in an ethics opinion last year, lawyer-directed nonrecourse commercial litigation funding does not violate New York rules on sharing fees with nonlawyers, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • 7 Questions To Add To Your Lateral Partner Questionnaire

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    Law firms should redesign the vetting process for lateral candidates so it directly addresses sexual harassment and assault issues, says Howard Rosenberg of Decipher.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Reed Smith Chief Marketing Officer Sadie Baron

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    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Sadie Baron, chief marketing officer at Reed Smith LLP.

  • 'Flexible Work' Makes Freelancing More Viable In BigLaw

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    The rise of remote work capabilities and advances in technology are making flexible, freelance legal work a more accessible career option for corporate attorneys, say Elizabeth Black and Sara Eng of InCloudCounsel.

  • Guest Feature

    Judge Weinstein On Activism, Gobbledegook, Going Robeless

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    Judge Jack Weinstein has served in the Eastern District of New York for over half a century. White and Williams LLP attorney Randy Maniloff visited his Brooklyn office to find out what makes the 97-year-old jurist tick.

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