Business of Law

  • July 24, 2020

    New Normal Of Legal Telework Likely To Outlast Pandemic

    The coronavirus has forced the majority of the legal workforce out of the office, but as firm leaders learn that their attorneys and staff can work efficiently from home, many say it is unlikely that they will ever go back to the prepandemic way of work.

  • July 24, 2020

    Law360's Guide To The Presidential Candidates' Legal Bills

    As the 2020 presidential election approaches amidst a global pandemic, an army of lawyers is working behind the scenes to handle the candidates' legal needs. Here’s the latest from Law360’s monthly presidential campaign legal spending tracker.

  • July 23, 2020

    Murder Threat To Judge Isn't Privileged Info, 8th Circ. Says

    The Eighth Circuit on Thursday affirmed a Minnesota man's conviction of making a murder threat to a federal judge, rejecting his arguments that his statements were privileged because he had been speaking with his attorneys and ruling that threats of violence don't "fall under the scope of attorney-client privilege."

  • July 23, 2020

    New York Bar Exam Is Back On — Online This October

    New York's State Board of Law Examiners has announced that the September bar exam, which was canceled last week, will now happen online and in October, according to a notice posted Thursday.

  • July 23, 2020

    Sens. Advance Picks For Federal Courts In Calif., Wis., Pa.

    The Senate Judiciary Committee gave bipartisan approval to five district court nominees on Thursday, paving the way for confirmation of three picks for California and one each for Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, including a Jones Day partner and a Foley & Lardner alum.

  • July 23, 2020

    Dems Move Bills To Rein In President's Power To Defy Probes

    A bitterly divided House Judiciary Committee moved bills Thursday to make it easier to bring criminal charges against ex-presidents and require the U.S. Department of Justice to share information about probes that lead to a pardon of anyone in the chief executive's family.

  • July 23, 2020

    BASF, Cahill Pay $73M To Settle Claims They Hid Asbestos

    BASF and its former counsel at Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP have reached a proposed $73 million settlement over claims they concealed that industrial and commercial talc from a Vermont mine may contain asbestos, according to a motion for preliminary approval filed Thursday in New Jersey federal court.

  • July 23, 2020

    Atty Wants Claims Over Failed $57M Mask Deal Tossed

    A California attorney and the CEO of a Los Angeles asset management company say they can't be sued in Florida by Adventist Health System over a soured deal to buy 10 million N95 masks for $57.5 million, because they personally have no connection to the deal or Florida.

  • July 23, 2020

    New Epstein Docs Unsealed As Maxwell Fails To Gag Boies

    Former Jeffrey Epstein associate Ghislaine Maxwell suffered a pair of courtroom setbacks Thursday morning, losing a bid to gag federal prosecutors and lawyers for witnesses in her sex trafficking case, and failing to convince a judge in a defamation suit to keep a trove of documents under seal.

  • July 23, 2020

    McDermott Pledges Free Legal Services To POC-Led Cos.

    McDermott Will & Emery LLP is one of the latest firms to offer up their legal expertise in response to a national reckoning over systemic racism and inequality, pledging to provide its services free of charge to 20 businesses that are led by at least one entrepreneur of color.

  • July 23, 2020

    Law360's Weekly Verdict: Legal Lions & Lambs

    Faegre Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP reigned supreme on this week's legal lions list with a win for Burger King in litigation over its Impossible Whoppers, while attorneys at Mahoney Law Group ended up among the legal lambs after a judge slammed them for missing deadlines on behalf of workers suing Denny's.

  • July 23, 2020

    DOJ Fines Arnold & Porter For Citizenship Hiring Bias

    Arnold & Porter and a legal staffing agency have agreed to pay nearly $60,000 to resolve claims that they illegally screened applicants based on their citizenship status while recruiting for a project two years ago, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday.

  • July 23, 2020

    Former Deputy SG Says Justices 'Stepped Up' In Historic Term

    By navigating a minefield of politically explosive cases amid the coronavirus pandemic, the U.S. Supreme Court "stepped up to the moment" by maintaining a semblance of normalcy during the global health crisis, veteran high court advocate Michael Dreeben told Law360 in an interview.

  • July 23, 2020

    Judge Scolds Gibson Dunn, Co-Counsel For 'Nonsensical' Jab

    A Texas federal judge chastised Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP and the firm's co-counsel Wednesday for calling his reasoning "nonsensical" in a legal brief and warned the firms that future such comments would warrant sanctions.

  • July 23, 2020

    Cohen Wins Release As Judge Says US Retaliated Over Book

    A Manhattan federal judge on Thursday granted home confinement to Donald Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen, finding federal authorities retaliated against him when he was jailed two weeks ago after he asked questions about a demand that he not publish a book about the president while subject to probation.

  • July 22, 2020

    Cohen Jailed For Antagonism, Not Trump Book, Feds Say

    Federal prosecutors said that Donald Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen lost his chance at early release from prison after he was antagonistic with probation officers and refused to sign a home confinement agreement, denying Wednesday that it had anything to do with his apparent plans to publish a book about the president.

  • July 22, 2020

    Work Begins To Scrub Protest Graffiti From NYC Courthouses

    Two historic New York City courthouses in downtown Manhattan were surrounded by city workers Wednesday trying to scrub and power wash graffiti that first appeared weeks ago, after police cleared a protest encampment in a predawn raid that morning.

  • July 22, 2020

    Missed Deadline Dooms Class Claims In Denny's OT Case

    A California federal judge on Wednesday shredded two attorneys who missed a deadline for asking the court to certify an overtime class action against Denny's and blamed it in part on the state's shutdown orders, cutting the class component from the case.

  • July 22, 2020

    Judge Says Asbestos Trial Would Be 'Dreadful Experience'

    A West Virginia judge has urged parties in consolidated asbestos litigation to settle so they can avoid the "dreadful experience" of participating in a live trial requiring social distancing protocol amidst the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • July 22, 2020

    'Waiting Is Not An Option': NJ Plans To Restart Jury Trials

    New Jersey judiciary officials unveiled a plan Wednesday to resume jury trials in September under a hybrid system that will combine remote jury selection with in-person proceedings, saying "waiting is not an option" for litigants as the COVID-19 pandemic continues.

  • July 22, 2020

    Robinhood Class Counsel Given OK After Diversity Push

    A California federal judge on Wednesday appointed Cotchett Pitre & McCarthy LLP and Kaplan Fox & Kilsheimer LLP to lead a securities action against stock trading app Robinhood, signing off on the more diverse slate of attorneys after previously pointing out that the lead counsel hopefuls were all men.

  • July 22, 2020

    Special Master Rips Hagens Berman's Privilege Arguments

    A special master tasked by a Pennsylvania federal judge to find out if Hagens Berman Sobol Shapiro LLP dropped thalidomide birth defect claims against GlaxoSmithKline and others in good faith or simply to save its own skin lambasted arguments the firm made regarding potentially privileged material Wednesday.

  • July 22, 2020

    La. Joins States Letting Grads Bypass Bar Exam

    Louisiana's high court on Wednesday became the fourth in the country to temporarily grant diploma privilege to the state's law school graduates in a testy split ruling that had one dissenting justice asking: "Just what is the emergency?"

  • July 22, 2020

    Calif. Judges Told To Take Care Joining Social Justice Rallies

    Before California judges take part in any of the social justice protests across the country, they must think carefully about the ethical implications of their participation and consider their obligation to promote confidence in judicial impartiality, a state Supreme Court advisory committee said Wednesday.

  • July 22, 2020

    Pierce Bainbridge Founder Paid For Client's Lease, Suit Says

    A new suit claims Pierce Bainbridge founder John Pierce put up a client in a $1.3 million California home for nearly two years while the man was the plaintiff in a controversial suit against Microsoft, an unusual arrangement that experts said could run afoul of prohibitions on lawyers paying clients.

Expert Analysis

  • More Reasons To Redesign The Open Office Post-Pandemic

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    A new South Korean study demonstrates that the so-called open office adopted by so many U.S. companies is extremely dangerous in the COVID-19 world, which is important to consider as Congress may provide employers federal immunity from COVID-19 suits as they reopen, says Steven Moore at Withers.

  • Early Pandemic-Related Shifts We're Seeing In Legal Finance

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    As law firms chart their paths forward during these unsettled times, litigation funders are already observing changes in the types of products firms are seeking, such as an increase in one-off case funding requests, says Eric Blinderman at Therium.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: Purple Campaign's Ally Coll

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    As society continues to adapt to COVID-19, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Washington, D.C.-based Ally Coll, president and co-founder of The Purple Campaign.

  • Opinion

    The Death Of The LSAT

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    Over the last year, the LSAT has been anything but unflappable — it has not been the objective, standardized law school entrance exam it's supposed to be, say soon-to-be law student Elliot Fuchs and attorney Saul Bienenfeld.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: Facebook's Jeremiah Chan

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    With distancing and isolation the new norm amid COVID-19, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Silicon Valley-based Jeremiah Chan, head of patents at Facebook.

  • 5 Great-Recession Lessons GCs Must Remember Today

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    The 2008 financial crisis revealed that overleveraged law firms suffer the most disruption during an economic downturn and pass that disruption on to their clients, so general counsel should utilize certain metrics to identify appropriately leveraged firms, says Adam Bass at Buchalter.

  • Pandemic May Prompt Legislative Action On Court Deadlines

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    The COVID-19 crisis shines light on the fact that the federal government and most states do not have the power to toll statutes of limitations, and could lead to a full-scale reconsideration of the Federal Judiciary Emergency Powers Tolling Act or other legislative efforts, say Reed Brodsky and Michael Nadler at Gibson Dunn.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: Trial Attorney Teny Geragos

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    With distancing and isolation the new norm amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from New York-based Teny Geragos, an associate at criminal defense firm Brafman & Associates.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: Edelson's Jay Edelson

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    With distancing and isolation the new norm amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Chicago-based Jay Edelson, founder and CEO of plaintiffs boutique Edelson.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Richardson Reviews 'Criminal Dissent'

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    In his important new book, "Criminal Dissent," Wendell Bird endeavors to catalog every single actual, or even threatened, prosecution under the Sedition Act and removal under the Alien Friends Act — a monumental undertaking — and the results are striking, says U.S. District Judge Eli Richardson of the Middle District of Tennessee.

  • Tips For Minimizing Law Firm Liability During COVID-19

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    Lawyers may be advising clients on COVID-19 matters without the benefit of considered analysis or interpretive guidance, which could lead to legal malpractice suits down the road, but law firm management can mitigate the risks through certain protocols, says Nicole Hyland at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: Litigator Nicole Gueron

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    With distancing and isolation the new norm amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from New York-based Nicole Gueron, a litigator and founding partner at Clarick Gueron.

  • Opinion

    Cannabis Businesses Should Get Federal COVID-19 Relief

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    Given the myriad benefits that the marijuana industry provides to the U.S. economy, it is clearly wrong to exclude marijuana-related businesses from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act and other federal stimulus legislation, say Adam Berger and Shuki Greer of Berger Greer.

  • A Proposed Technology-Assisted Review Framework

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    Cases involving technology-assisted review often suffer from expensive arguments between parties over protocols and accuracy, but a new report card system that would allow litigants and courts to objectively assess a given document review methodology could mitigate those problems, say attorneys at Redgrave and Kirkland.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: Appellate Specialist Larry Ebner

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    With distancing and isolation the new norm amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Washington, D.C.-based Lawrence Ebner, founder of Capital Appellate Advocacy PLLC.

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