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Massachusetts

  • December 10, 2018

    New Nassar Abuse Probe Spotlights Institutional Failures

    The two organizations responsible for protecting young gymnasts from harm ignored and covered up credible allegations against Dr. Larry Nassar, acting as part of an "ecosystem" that gave him unimpeded license to abuse hundreds of children, a new Ropes & Gray LLP investigative report revealed Monday.

  • December 10, 2018

    Shire Must Cough Up Some Docs In Pay-For-Delay Suit

    Shire LLC will have to turn over documents in an antitrust suit accusing it and Actavis of settling a patent dispute over an ADHD drug on anti-competitive terms, a Massachusetts federal judge ruled Monday.

  • December 10, 2018

    Keryx Investor Sues In Chancery For Akebia Merger Records

    A Keryx Biopharmaceuticals Inc. investor sued Monday in Delaware Chancery Court for access to company records on a pending merger with Akebia Therapeutics Inc., saying the documents are needed to investigate potentially conflicted actions in the run-up to an approval vote Tuesday.

  • December 10, 2018

    Mass. Can't Ban Secret Recording Of Officials, Police

    A blanket ban on secret audio recording in Massachusetts is unconstitutional when the person being recorded is a government official or a police officer performing their duties in public, a federal judge ruled Monday, granting a partial win to a conservative provocateur journalist and two activists in two cases.

  • December 10, 2018

    BioChemics Receiver Taps Sunstein, Nields For IP Work

    A receiver appointed to help liquidate the assets of BioChemics Inc. as the government tries to collect on a nearly $18 million securities fraud judgment has tapped two law firms, Sunstein Kann Murphy & Timbers LLP and Nields Lemack & Frame LLC, to maintain the Massachusetts company's intellectual property.

  • December 10, 2018

    Choice, Not Faith, Led Fired Worker To Skip Vaccine: Hospital

    Inconsistent answers given by a Massachusetts hospital worker who claims she was fired for refusing a flu shot doom her Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit because they show her own choice, and not religious doctrine, drove her decision to skip the shot, the hospital argued in a Saturday brief.

  • December 10, 2018

    Ga. Man To Admit Role In $2M Lotto Scam Targeting Elderly

    A Georgia man will plead guilty in Massachusetts for helping steal $2 million from elderly people across the country in a fake-lottery scheme that has already landed one alleged co-conspirator behind bars, according to an agreement filed Friday.

  • December 7, 2018

    Dems Urge FCC Not To Classify Texting As An Info Service

    A group of Democratic senators are urging the Federal Communications Commission to drop plans to classify text messaging as an information service rather than a telecommunications one, saying that such a move would give providers a free pass to censor consumers' text messages.

  • December 7, 2018

    BCBS Mass. Gets Wilderness Therapy Coverage Row Trimmed

    A Massachusetts federal judge has agreed to trim a proposed class action against Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Massachusetts accusing the insurer of wrongly refusing to cover wilderness therapy treatment for policyholders’ children.

  • December 7, 2018

    Mass. Winner-Take-All Electoral System Sound, Judge Rules

    A bid by a former Massachusetts governor and two Republicans to change the state's winner-take-all practice for selecting presidential electors was dismissed Friday by a federal judge who ruled the system — which is in place in 48 states and the District of Columbia — does not violate the U.S. Constitution.

  • December 7, 2018

    Data-Driven Lawyer: Morgan Lewis' J. Kyle Poe

    Morgan Lewis' J. Kyle Poe, a self-proclaimed "elder millennial," created a client management platform to streamline the firm's work in asbestos litigation that is now used across practice areas, making the firm's business more efficient and upping its ability to attract clients through innovative fee arrangements, earning him a spot on our 2018 list of Data-Driven Lawyers.

  • December 7, 2018

    Moderna Leads IPO Pair Raising $735M

    Clinical-stage biotechnology company Moderna late Thursday said it raised more than $604 million in an initial public offering touted as the largest biotech IPO ever, alongside another offering that reaped roughly $131 million for cancer and autoimmune disorder-focused Synthorx.

  • December 7, 2018

    Kirkland Nixes Forced Arbitration For Non-Attorney Staff

    Kirkland & Ellis LLP told employees it would end its policy of requiring arbitration to settle employment disputes for all non-attorney staff, according to a memo obtained Friday by Law360 and following public pressure mounted by a group of Harvard Law School students.

  • December 7, 2018

    Belgian Busted In Scheme To Dupe US Law Firms, Charities

    A Belgian national who was indicted by a federal grand jury for a scheme to convince law firms and charities to wire him money was arraigned in Boston federal court Friday, 22 months after a warrant was issued for his arrest.

  • December 6, 2018

    Genocea Beats Investor Claims It Hid Truth About Herpes Drug

    A Massachusetts federal judge dismissed a proposed investor class action Thursday against Genocea Biosciences Inc., saying accusations that the company hid negative test results before announcing it could not finance ongoing trials for a genital herpes immunotherapy were not sufficiently supported for the case to proceed.

  • December 6, 2018

    Justices Told Corp. Campaign Money Ban Unconstitutional

    Two Massachusetts small businesses have urged the U.S. Supreme Court to take up their challenge to a state ban on corporate contributions to political campaigns, calling the law “unfair” since the prohibition doesn’t extend to labor union contributions.

  • December 6, 2018

    Virginia AG Joins Colleagues In Group Fighting Robocalls

    Virginia's attorney general announced Thursday that he is joining a bipartisan group of 40 attorneys general tasked with reviewing the technology being used by telecommunications companies to combat the widespread practice of robocalling.

  • December 6, 2018

    Mass. Priest Can't Escape SEC's Short-Selling Suit

    A Greek Orthodox priest who is also a hedge fund manager lost his bid to duck a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission short-selling suit after a Massachusetts federal judge said from the bench Thursday that she will keep at least one of the counts against him alive.

  • December 6, 2018

    Gov't Presses Judge To Force Insys Founder To Produce Docs

    Prosecutors tried to persuade a Massachusetts federal judge to force the billionaire founder of Insys Therapeutics Inc. to hand over documents they say relate to their attempts to prove a conspiracy to bribe doctors, warning that failure to do so would back defendants’ efforts to shield discovery during a hearing Thursday afternoon.

  • December 6, 2018

    Ridgeview Capital Founder To Cop To Sham Trade Scheme

    The founder of private equity firm Ridgeview Capital Partners LLC has agreed to plead guilty to securities fraud and aiding and abetting the same after placing buy and sell orders to create an illusion of active trading, according to a filing in Massachusetts federal court Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • State Net

    More State Issues The Blue Wave May Shape In 2019

    Rich Ehisen

    In the second installment of this three-part legislative preview, Rich Ehisen of State Net Capitol Journal examines a number of issues that should keep state lawmakers occupied next year.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Ginsburg Reviews 'The Curse Of Bigness'

    Judge Douglas Ginsburg

    When reading Tim Wu’s new book, "The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age," lawyers, economists and historians will find its broad brush maddening, and the generalist reader will simply be misled, says D.C. Circuit Judge Douglas Ginsburg.

  • 5 Things You Should Know About New Rule 23 Amendments

    John Lavelle

    For the first time in 15 years, Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23, governing class actions, has been amended. There are five key changes that will likely impact future federal class action litigation and settlements, say John Lavelle and Terese Schireson of Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP.

  • State Net

    State Lawmakers Face Familiar Challenges In 2019

    Korey Clark

    Many of the issues that are most likely to draw the attention of state lawmakers next year — including cybersecurity, internet and data privacy, blockchain and cryptocurrencies, sales taxes on remote sellers, transportation and telecommunications infrastructure, and marijuana — are already familiar, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Climate Change Forecasts Trouble For The Insurance Industry

    Jeffrey Gordon

    The greater frequency and severity of weather-related catastrophes in areas with increasing property values present significant challenges for the insurance industry, especially in cities like Boston that are particularly susceptible to rising sea levels, says Jeffrey Gordon of Zelle LLP.

  • FinCEN Tightens The Net On Illicit Real Estate Deals

    Thomas Delaney

    Geographic targeting orders released this month indicate that the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network remains concerned about money laundering risks in the real estate sector — and the anonymity of transactions that use virtual currency, say attorneys with Mayer Brown LLP.

  • In Hip Implant MDL, Preemption Cuts Across State Lines

    Michelle Hart Yeary

    Plaintiffs in the Smith & Nephew Birmingham Hip Resurfacing multidistrict litigation were subject to different states' statutes of limitations. But whether you bleed Michigan blue or you live where a grizzly bear is your only neighbor, preemption unites us all, says Michelle Hart Yeary of Dechert LLP.

  • Climate Change Lawsuits Face Crucial Hurdles

    John Lee

    The close of 2018 brings a chance to look at the state of climate change lawsuits filed in the last few years by both government entities and groups of young Americans. While each case type employs different legal strategies, both face similar challenges, says John Lee of Goldberg Segalla.

  • Jurors Should Ask More Questions During Trials

    Matthew Wright

    Permitting jurors to submit written questions, or even to pose questions orally to witnesses on the stand, advances several important goals and promotes both fairness and efficiency, says Matthew Wright of McCarter & English LLP.

  • Opinion

    A Call For Nationwide Consistency On Noncompetes

    Steven Kayman

    There is something to be said for and against all of the various approaches taken to address the nettlesome problem of noncompetes. But little can be said to justify what we now have — a complex quilt work of varying laws and rules, say Steven Kayman of Proskauer Rose LLP and Lauren Davis, a law clerk with the New Jersey Superior Court​​​​​​​.