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Product Liability

  • August 17, 2018

    600 Lb Gorillas Gets $725K Of $3.9M Sought In Dessert Spat

    Novelty dessert company 600 lb Gorillas was awarded a fraction of the $3.9 million it sought in a breach of contract suit over allegedly subpar ice cream, getting only $725,000 from a Massachusetts federal jury on Friday, while its supplier Mister Cookie Face was handed the full $270,000 it wanted for a counterclaim over being stuck with unused ice cream sandwiches.

  • August 16, 2018

    Will Law Schools Start Counting ‘Generation ADA’?

    No one is tracking law students with disabilities to see where the education system may be failing them, but some advocates are working to change this dynamic and build a better pipeline.

  • August 16, 2018

    VA Agent Orange Policy Fight To Get Full Fed Circ. Hearing

    The full Federal Circuit on Thursday agreed to consider whether the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has wrongly excluded “blue water” Navy veterans from benefits related to exposure to the notorious defoliant Agent Orange during the Vietnam War, roughly a decade after a court panel had backed the agency's stance.

  • August 16, 2018

    Georgia-Pacific Affiliate’s Ch. 11 Slammed As ‘Sham’

    Georgia-Pacific affiliate Bestwall LLC’s bankruptcy is a “sham” and a “farce” designed to wall off its parent company from exposure to asbestos claims, a committee of asbestos claimants said Wednesday in seeking to get the case dismissed.

  • August 16, 2018

    8th Circ. BNSF Ruling Clarifies Federal Preemption

    The Eighth Circuit’s recent finding that BNSF Railway Co. can sue a seat manufacturer over an engineer’s injury clarifies that state law claims based on federal safety standards don’t upend the national uniformity in railroad regulations that has long been protected by federal law, experts say.

  • August 16, 2018

    DEA To Cut Drugmaker Production Of Most-Abused Opioids

    The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration on Thursday moved to curtail drugmaker production of the most commonly abused prescription opioids, saying the cut will inhibit illicit sales of narcotic painkillers.

  • August 16, 2018

    NY Appeals Court Halts New York Islanders Asbestos Claims

    A New York state appeals panel on Wednesday upheld the bulk of the dismissal of a Nassau Coliseum employee’s suit against New York Islanders Hockey Club and Nassau County alleging that he had sustained lung injuries from working at the arena, finding that he filed the suit too late.

  • August 16, 2018

    Insurer Seeks To Duck Lumber Liquidators' $36M Settlement

    St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Co. sued policyholder Lumber Liquidators on Wednesday over coverage for $36 million worth of recently proposed settlements regarding defect claims, including over allegedly formaldehyde-laden wood flooring.

  • August 16, 2018

    DOT Can't Stop Ex-Engineer From Being Deposed, Judge Says

    A New York federal judge on Thursday said a former government engineer can be deposed by investors in a securities class action claiming Fiat Chrysler lied over its alleged use of emissions-cheating devices in its vehicles, disagreeing with the U.S. Department of Transportation that its regulations could prevent an ex-government employee's testimony.

  • August 16, 2018

    Monsanto's $289M Roundup Loss Ripples Across Industries

    A California jury’s decision last week to award a retired groundskeeper $289 million against Monsanto in a Roundup cancer trial is certain to unleash a torrent of new litigation against the agri-giant, experts tell Law360, and the massive award for a product with “potential risks” could spur failure-to-warn litigation more broadly.

  • August 16, 2018

    Finnish Co. Can't Dodge Arbitration Over Engine Failure

    A Texas federal judge has refused to break up arbitration launched by an insurer over a malfunctioning power plant engine, saying it's up to an International Centre for Dispute Resolution panel to decide whether a Finnish engine seller must arbitrate the claims.

  • August 16, 2018

    Athenex Pharma OK'd To Intervene In Par Suit Against FDA

    A D.C. federal judge has cleared pharmaceutical company Athenex Pharma Solutions LLC to intervene in Par Pharmaceutical's suit accusing the U.S. Food and Drug Administration of improperly letting compounding pharmacies sell cheaper copycats of its blood pressure drug vasopressin.

  • August 16, 2018

    Buchalter Adds 2 Attys To Corp., Litigation Groups In LA

    Buchalter PC’s Los Angeles office has added two new attorneys as shareholders, one from Clark & Trevithick AP and one from Rimon Law, entering the firm’s corporate and litigation practice groups, respectively.

  • August 16, 2018

    NJ High Court Centralizes Some J&J Hernia Mesh Lawsuits

    The New Jersey Supreme Court has signed off on the centralized management of state lawsuits involving claims that a certain Johnson & Johnson hernia mesh product was defective and seriously injured consumers, while declining to consolidate cases dealing with similar devices.

  • August 16, 2018

    A Chat With Ogletree Knowledge Chief Patrick DiDomenico

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Patrick DiDomenico, chief knowledge officer at Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • August 16, 2018

    Rising Star: Greenberg Traurig's Marcella Ducca

    Greenberg Traurig LLP shareholder Marcella Ducca’s expertise in women’s health products, particularly her work for Bard in the massive transvaginal mesh litigation, has landed her a spot among the five product liability attorneys under 40 on Law360’s list of Rising Stars.

  • August 15, 2018

    Atty Asks Ill. Justices To Disbar Him For Faking $4M Deal

    An Illinois attorney who’s accused of lying to clients for years about the status of their lawsuits, including when his law license was already suspended, has asked to be disbarred by the state’s Supreme Court.

  • August 15, 2018

    NY, Calif. L'Oreal Keratin Classes Get Partial Cert.

    A federal judge Wednesday granted partial certification to New York and California classes in false advertising litigation against L'Oreal USA Inc. over a shampoo and two related hair products, denying some class claims and a nationwide class because they turned on whether consumers relied on the alleged misrepresentations, which can only be determined individually.

  • August 15, 2018

    Insurers Sue RV Maker After 'Spontaneous Fire' In Vehicle

    Recreational vehicle manufacturer Newmar Corp. removed to federal court Wednesday claims brought by four insurance companies seeking reimbursement for coverage of payments they made to vehicle owners after an RV made by Newmar spontaneously burst into flames and damaged other vehicles at a Florida storage facility.

  • August 15, 2018

    Insurer Off Hook In Texas Employment Appeal

    A Texas appeals court on Wednesday blessed the win of insurer Texas Mutual in an underlying dispute over coverage for a policyholder whose employee sued after being injured in the course of railroad work.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Lipez Reviews 'Last Great Colonial Lawyer'

    Judge Kermit Lipez

    In his new book, "The Last Great Colonial Lawyer: The Life and Legacy of Jeremiah Gridley," Charles McKirdy argues that Gridley — someone I had never heard of — was the last great colonial lawyer, and that his cases illuminate his times. The author largely substantiates both claims, says First Circuit Judge Kermit Lipez.

  • How 2 Cases Have Settled NY Insurance Allocation Law

    Cort Malone

    The past two years have seen insurance coverage lawyers coming to terms with the impact of two landscape-changing decisions from New York's highest court, Viking Pump and Keyspan. Together, these cases make clear that under New York law, the allocation approach that will apply to long tail claims is governed by the presence of certain policy language, say Cort Malone and Vivian Michael of Anderson Kill PC.

  • 6 Tips For Drafting Autonomous Vehicle Contracts

    Jim Jordan

    During the past year, I have been tossed headfirst into the murky water of autonomous vehicle contract drafting, where no well-tested forms exist and negotiating parties often do not know what terms to request. But what is required more than anything is just old-fashioned, common-sense business lawyering, says Jim Jordan of Munsch Hardt Kopf & Harr PC.

  • Why A Hoverboard Suit Against Amazon Went Up In Flames

    Jed Winer

    Should an e-commerce firm be held liable for the defects of every item it sells on its global internet marketplace? The plaintiffs in Fox v. Amazon.com argued exactly that, and the district court answered with a resounding “no.” Online marketplaces are simply not in a position to supervise every product sold on their platforms, says Jed Winer of Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP.

  • Interview Essentials For Attorneys On The Move

    Eileen Decker

    Across the country this fall, recent law school graduates, law firm associates and experienced professionals will interview for positions in private practice and government service. Sharing tips on how to stand out in this high-pressure, hypercompetitive process are Eileen Decker, former U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, and Keith Jacoby, co-chairman of Littler Mendelson PC’s class action practice group.

  • Risk Mitigation Strategies For Gene Therapy Developers

    Matt Holian

    In recent weeks, a handful of scientific articles in peer-reviewed medical literature, as well as alarmist headlines in the popular press, have questioned the safety of an important gene editing technology. While plaintiffs lawyers may take such indicators of evolving science out of context to support future claims, there are ways companies can mitigate the risks, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Roundup

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg joined the U.S. Supreme Court 25 years ago and is not planning to retire anytime soon — she has hired clerks through 2020. What's it like to assist Justice Ginsburg? In this series, former clerks reflect on the experience.

  • Opinion

    A Right To Carry Everywhere, On A Road To Nowhere

    Robert W. Ludwig

    On July 24, a Ninth Circuit panel applied textualist reasoning in Young v. Hawaii to secure a right for individuals to carry firearms in public. To end the gun epidemic — demonstrated in Chicago recently with 74 people shot in one weekend — it’s past time to turn a spotlight on the root cause: legal carelessness and oversights of text, says Robert W. Ludwig of the American Enlightenment Project.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 3 Surprises

    David Post

    It had never occurred to me that judges don’t always love the way their appellate cousins review their work and tell them — in public — all the things they got wrong. I was frequently struck by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s acute awareness of the delicacy of this relationship, says attorney David Post.

  • Testing Mandate Is Straining California Cannabis Cos.

    Oren Bitan

    California’s Proposition 64 legalized recreational cannabis, but set a deadline of July 1, 2018, for cannabis products to be tested for a range of toxic substances. Since then, one in every five pot samples have failed required testing, posing big challenges for the industry, says Oren Bitan of Buchalter PC.