Product Liability

  • February 26, 2024

    Lyft Can't Escape Claims Its Driver Failed To Protect Teenager

    A Connecticut federal judge won't let Lyft out of a suit alleging one of its drivers drove a 14-year-old out of state to a location where she was sexually abused, saying the girl's family is allowed to amend its complaint.

  • February 26, 2024

    Jury Awards Woodworking Co. $158K Over 'Lemon' Machine

    A Georgia federal jury has found that the manufacturer of a high-tech woodworking machine breached warranty duties to the device's buyer, awarding nearly $160,000 to a Massachusetts business that alleged it was sold a "lemon" of a machine.

  • February 26, 2024

    Product Liability Group Of The Year: Covington

    Covington & Burling LLP's product liability group helped McKesson Corp. notch a trial win in the nationwide opioid litigation and secured a dismissal of claims against Hain Celestial Group Inc. over allegations that their baby food contained dangerous amounts of heavy metals, earning the group a spot as one of Law360's Product Liability Groups of the Year.

  • February 26, 2024

    NJ, Solvay Push Back Against Town's Bid To Pause PFAS Deal

    New Jersey and the American arm of Belgian chemical company Solvay have slammed a Garden State town's bid to pause final approval of a $393 million settlement over "forever chemical" contamination, calling it disingenuous and arguing such a move would only delay the assistance the settlement would provide towns impacted by the pollution.

  • February 26, 2024

    BP, Chevron Lose 4th Circ. Fight Over Climate Suit Venue

    The Fourth Circuit on Monday rejected the latest attempt by BP, Chevron, ExxonMobil and other oil titans to go to federal court to litigate complaints that accuse them of lying about fossil fuels' climate effects, joining multiple courts in reasoning that the claims don't invoke federal law.

  • February 24, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Social Media Laws & Bump Stocks

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments related to three big-ticket cases this week in a pair of First Amendment challenges to Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on their viewpoints and a dispute over the federal government's authority to ban bump stocks.

  • February 23, 2024

    Gun Cos. Can't End New York AG's Ghost Gun Crisis Suit

    A New York federal judge Friday largely denied a dismissal bid by gun distributors accused by New York Attorney General Letitia James of selling gun parts that can be easily converted into "ghost guns" to customers without background checks, rejecting the distributors' argument that the state's claims infringe on the Second Amendment.

  • February 23, 2024

    Hershey Wants Suit Over Metals In Chocolate Axed For Good

    The Hershey Co. urged a California federal judge on Thursday to toss a proposed class action alleging some of the candy maker's dark chocolate products contain dangerous levels of lead and cadmium for good, saying the small amount of heavy metals in the chocolate are naturally occurring and not dangerous.

  • February 23, 2024

    Miss. High Court Won't Axe Liver Failure Wrongful Death Suit

    The Mississippi Supreme Court reinstated wrongful death claims brought by the widow of a driver who suffered injuries in an auto crash but died due to liver failure after being prescribed acetaminophen, finding that the question of whether his death was foreseeable is one for the jury to decide.

  • February 23, 2024

    Social Media Addiction Fight Akin To Big Tobacco, Judge Says

    A California federal judge appeared skeptical Friday of dismissing claims by parents and children seeking to hold Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg liable in sprawling personal injury multidistrict litigation over social media's allegedly addictive design, comparing the addiction allegations to Big Tobacco cases that proceeded past the pleading stage.

  • February 23, 2024

    Fla. Doctor Says T-Mobile Let Hacker Steal Her SIM Card

    A Tampa, Florida, doctor has sued T-Mobile for allegedly failing to stop a "SIM swap" hacker from transferring her personal phone account and then doing little to address the identity theft that followed, which involved the hacker trying to steal thousands from her retirement account and using her medical credentials to write more than 700 fraudulent prescriptions.

  • February 23, 2024

    Tobacco Cos. Look To Nix COPD Suit Decades After Diagnosis

    Tobacco companies R.J. Reynolds and Philip Morris asked a Massachusetts state judge on Friday to end a wrongful death lawsuit brought decades after a woman's COPD diagnosis and nearly three years after her death, pointing to a state high court ruling last summer that affirmed strict time limits for such claims.

  • February 23, 2024

    5th Circ. Won't Revive Mississippi Plane Crash Suit

    The Fifth Circuit has affirmed a Mississippi federal judge's decision dismissing claims by an airplane pilot who was severely injured in a crash, ruling that a lower court was right to dismiss the case on jurisdictional grounds.

  • February 23, 2024

    Walgreens Investors Near Deal In Suit Over Opioid Epidemic

    An Illinois federal judge agreed Friday to maintain a stay in a stockholder derivative suit accusing Walgreens and its leadership of failing to limit retail pharmacies from dispensing unreasonable amounts of opioids, a day after the parties announced an agreement in principle to resolve their dispute.

  • February 23, 2024

    Judge Nixes Walmart 'Raw Honey' False Ad Class Action

    A Chicago federal judge granted dismissal of a proposed class action against Walmart alleging its "raw honey" and "organic raw honey" were falsely branded, saying there were no allegations about what the lead plaintiff believed when he bought the products, or what a reasonable consumer would believe.

  • February 23, 2024

    US Gun Cos. Seek Time For Justices' Input On Mexico's Suit

    Gunmakers facing a recently revived lawsuit looking to hold them liable for firearms trafficking and cartel violence in Mexico on Friday asked a Boston federal judge to stand down and halt proceedings so the U.S. Supreme Court can have a chance to review the case.

  • February 23, 2024

    Holland & Knight Product Liability Ace Rejoins Reed Smith

    Reed Smith LLP has rehired a former partner who, in his first stint with the firm, spent a little over nine years representing pharmaceutical and medical device companies in product liability and other litigation, the firm announced Thursday.

  • February 22, 2024

    Family Dollar Accused Of Knowingly Selling Unsafe Drugs

    Two customers hit Family Dollar Stores Inc. and its parent company Dollar Tree Inc. with a proposed class action Wednesday in Florida federal court, alleging the discount chain stored over-the-counter drugs in high temperatures but still sold the unsafe products to consumers.

  • February 22, 2024

    Gilead Reaches Deal In Suit Over Counterfeit HIV Drug

    Gilead Sciences Inc. has agreed to a deal to end a suit in New York federal court against Safe Chain Solutions LLC over allegedly counterfeit versions of Gilead HIV medications, with Safe Chain being barred from buying certain Gilead products.

  • February 22, 2024

    Fire Product Makers Try To Move PFAS Suit To Fed. Court

    A group of chemical companies that produce fire suppressants are seeking to move to federal court a suit brought by the Connecticut attorney general looking to rein in the use of PFAS chemicals, saying they are entitled to a federal forum to exercise a "government contractor" defense.

  • February 22, 2024

    Things To Watch As Boeing's 737 Max Crisis Grows

    Boeing is bracing for another round of government investigations, production pauses and mounting litigation in its enduring 737 Max crisis after last month's midair panel blowout, but experts say a leadership shakeup and promises to enhance inspections offer cold comfort to regulators, airlines and passengers.

  • February 22, 2024

    Wolverine Wants Judgment, Sanctions In PFAS Coverage Row

    Footwear company Wolverine asked a Michigan federal court Thursday to grant it a win and impose additional sanctions against its insurer for continued "flagrant disregard and willful disobedience of discovery orders" in a dispute over coverage of PFAS chemical injury suits that may set the tone for similar litigation.

  • February 22, 2024

    Chamber, Biz Groups Fight Class Cert. In GM Defect Suit

    Automotive and product manufacturer associations on Wednesday sided with General Motors in seeking to reverse the certification of 26 classes of drivers who allege the automaker sold vehicles with defective transmissions, saying allowing classes to include uninjured drivers would create billions of dollars in unnecessary litigation.

  • February 22, 2024

    SoCal Edison Faces More Suits Over 2022 Fairview Fire

    Southern California Edison has been slapped in state court with two additional lawsuits by California residents alleging the company should be held liable for causing the deadly Fairview Fire in September 2022 that charred more than 28,000 acres, destroyed 36 structures and killed at least two people.

  • February 22, 2024

    Bumble Reaches $315K Settlement In Criminal Screening Case

    Dating app company Bumble has agreed to pay $315,000 and change its business practices to settle claims brought by New Jersey Attorney General Matthew Platkin that it failed to disclose its criminal background-check screening policies.

Expert Analysis

  • How Consumer Product Cos. Can Keep Up With Class Actions

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    Recent cases show California's federal courts and the Ninth Circuit remain the preferred arena for consumers pursuing false advertising and trade deception claims against companies — so manufacturers, distributors and retailers of consumer products should continue to watch these courts for guidance on how to fight class actions, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • The Section 230 Immunity Provision Debate Continues

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    The Fifth Circuit last month voted in Doe v. Snap Inc. not to reconsider en banc its decade-old interpretation of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which generally allows websites to police objectionable content as they see fit — but a growing number of judges appear motivated to further limit the scope of its immunity, say Jordan Rice and Caleb Hayes-Deats at MoloLamken.

  • Opinion

    Why Justices Should Protect Public From Bump Stocks

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    In Garland v. Cargill, the U.S. Supreme Court has the opportunity to restore the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' rule banning bump stocks — thus preserving Congress' original intent to protect the American people from particularly dangerous firearms, says Douglas Letter at Brady United Against Gun Violence.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • Time To Step Up PFAS Due Diligence In Cross-Border M&A

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    Regulations in the U.S. and EU governing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances will likely evolve to become global standards out of necessity and scale, so PFAS due diligence — particularly for buyers, sellers, and lenders and investors involved in multijurisdictional mergers and acquisitions — will be essential in 2024, say attorneys at Shipman & Goodwin.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Landmark Product Safety Prosecution May Signal Sea Change

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    U.S. v. Chu, a novel prosecution and guilty verdict of corporate executives for failing to report product defects under a consumer safety law, will certainly not be the last case of its kind, and companies will need to prepare for the government’s increasingly aggressive enforcement approach, say attorneys at Cooley.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • What To Know About FCA Cybersecurity Enforcement

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    Now is a good time for practitioners, government contractors and potential relators to review recent developments in cybersecurity-related False Claims Act enforcement, and consider best practices for navigating this space in the new year, say Ellen London at London & Stout, and Li Yu and Molly Knobler at DiCello Levitt.

  • What One Litigator Learned Serving On A Jury

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    Kilpatrick attorney April Isaacson shares insights for trial lawyers from her recent experience serving on a jury for the first time, including lessons about the impact of frequent sidebars, considerations for using demonstratives, the importance of clear jury instructions, and the unconscious habits that can drive jurors mad.

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