Telecommunications

  • June 25, 2021

    High Court Limits Class Standing In TransUnion FCRA Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday cut down a certified class of consumers suing TransUnion over alleged violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, finding that not all members had suffered the concrete harm necessary to proceed with their claims and recover statutory damages. 

  • June 25, 2021

    BT Defends 'Rational' Pricing In £590M Overcharging Suit

    BT told a competition tribunal in London on Friday that a £589 million ($820 million) class action accusing it of charging unfair prices for landlines should be struck out because the claim lacks the analysis required to justify it going to trial.

  • June 24, 2021

    Hotly Debated Tech Antitrust Reforms Clear House Committee

    A legislative drive for antitrust reforms to tackle tech industry abuses continued Thursday on Capitol Hill, as the House Judiciary Committee agreed to a bipartisan package of four bills that would roll back Big Tech's market power.

  • June 24, 2021

    FTC Seeks Early Win In Fake Inmate Calling Plan Case

    The Federal Trade Commission wants a California federal court to go ahead and declare it the winner in a civil enforcement action against a man accused of running a $1.2 million scam advertising unlimited inmate calling plans they could not provide.

  • June 24, 2021

    HP Spinoff Waived Right To Redo $173M Verdict, Court Told

    A Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co. spinoff shouldn't be able to wipe out a $172.6 million jury verdict or seek out a new trial, a patent holder told a Texas federal court Thursday, arguing the spinoff waived its arguments by not raising them before the jury trial.

  • June 24, 2021

    Biden, GOP Senators Strike $1.2T Infrastructure Deal

    In a major step toward advancing his economic agenda, President Joe Biden reached a deal Thursday with a bipartisan group of U.S. senators on an estimated $1.2 trillion infrastructure plan, but it likely hinges on passage of a separate reconciliation bill addressing the president's other legislative priorities.

  • June 24, 2021

    'Robot Lawyer' Escapes TCPA Suit After Top Court Draws Line

    A popular "robot lawyer" that automatically calls potential clients isn't an "autodialer" under federal consumer protection law given recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions, a California federal judge ruled Thursday in tossing a proposed class action against the company behind the system.

  • June 24, 2021

    Robbins Geller Taps Boies To Appeal DQ For 'Fraud' On Court

    Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP has hired a team of legal titans, including David Boies and SCOTUSblog founder Thomas Goldstein, to appeal a ruling that it committed "fraud" on a Manhattan federal court by failing to disclose short positions held by the lead plaintiff in securities litigation stemming from the FIFA corruption scandal.

  • June 24, 2021

    FCC Faces 2nd DC Circ. Challenge To 5.9 GHz Sharing Plan

    If the D.C. Circuit doesn't step in and stop the Federal Communications Commission from opening up the 5.9 GHz band, wireless devices will be like cicadas: everywhere, but "they won't leave after six weeks," a nonprofit data network has told the court.

  • June 24, 2021

    Google Delays Putting Lid On Third-Party Cookie Jar

    Government antitrust pressure, especially from the United Kingdom, helped drive Google to announce a delay Thursday in its plan to phase out use of third-party cookies in its Chrome browser, in order to do so "at a responsible pace."

  • June 24, 2021

    VoIP Co. Says Insurer Owes Coverage For Fake Reviews Suit

    A Voice over Internet Protocol company told an Arizona federal court that Aspen American Insurance Co. wrongly denied it coverage for a lawsuit accusing it of writing bogus reviews in an effort to steer potential customers away from a competitor.

  • June 24, 2021

    PTAB Lops Off 10 Of 11 Claims From Fiber Optic Patent

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has invalidated the bulk of claims in an Oyster Optics LLC fiber optic patent challenged by Infinera Corp., coming about a month after the parties settled parallel litigation in Texas federal court.

  • June 24, 2021

    Facebook Agrees To Pay $6.5M Atty Fees In Data Breach Case

    Facebook has agreed to pay $6.5 million in attorney fees and litigation costs for lawyers representing a class of Facebook users that reached a nonmonetary settlement with the social media company over a data breach, according to a Wednesday filing in a California federal court.

  • June 24, 2021

    BT Fights Bid For Class Status In £590M Landline Rate Suit

    A telecoms consultant urged a competition tribunal on Thursday to allow him to bring a £589 million ($820 million) class action against BT on behalf of millions of customers allegedly overcharged by the telecommunications giant for their landline use.  

  • June 23, 2021

    Five Insurers Sue Comcast, Verizon Over Philly Highrise Flood

    Five insurers have sued Comcast Corp. and Verizon Communications, alleging the telecommunication giants' negligently installed cables caused flooding inside Philadelphia's Two Liberty Place skyscraper last summer.

  • June 23, 2021

    House Panel Advances Antitrust Overhaul As GOP Splinters

    A House committee passed multiple proposals to change U.S. antitrust laws Wednesday, even as split Republican votes exposed the depths of an internal GOP rift over how much power the federal government should have to rein in the largest tech companies.

  • June 23, 2021

    Fed. Circ. Says PTAB Partly Erred In Apple IP Challenge

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday breathed new life into Apple's fight at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board against some claims in a patent on dual-aperture camera technology owned by a Samsung unit, finding that the board made a mathematical mistake.

  • June 23, 2021

    Apple Settles With Fortress, Leaving Intel To Go It Alone

    Apple appears to have struck a global bargain with Fortress Investment Group, dropping out of a joint lawsuit with Intel accusing the hedge fund of running an anti-competitive patent aggregation scheme and simultaneously announcing settlements in at least 18 different patent infringement lawsuits against the tech giant.

  • June 23, 2021

    Bill Would Make Ligado Pay For GPS Interference Costs

    A bipartisan Senate bill could require Ligado Networks to pick up the tab for any disruptions the private sector experiences if it forges ahead with repurposing the L-band satellite airwaves for mobile transmissions.

  • June 23, 2021

    Iran Official Announces US Sanctions Deal Amid Media Scuffle

    A top Iranian official announced major concessions from the U.S. in recent nuclear negotiations, media outlets in the Islamic Republic reported Wednesday, hours after the U.S. Department of Justice seized dozens of Iranian websites for allegedly spreading disinformation.

  • June 23, 2021

    Sen. Seeks Tech Giants' Plans For Connected Device Data

    Sen. Amy Klobuchar has asked the heads of Google and Amazon for more information about the companies' smart speakers and other connected devices over concerns about competition and how they use data collected by the products.

  • June 23, 2021

    Staffing Firm CEO Admits Media Agency Bribe Scheme

    A North Carolina woman whose company provided staff for the U.S. Agency for Global Media has pled guilty to taking part in a bribery scheme with the one-time contracting officer for the agency, which runs the Voice of America radio service.

  • June 23, 2021

    Rimon Makes Inroads In Delaware With IP Hire

    Rimon PC announced on Tuesday that, in continuing its rapid expansion, it has hired intellectual property partner Zhun Lu from Offit Kurman PA to help establish a new office in Newark, Delaware.

  • June 23, 2021

    NY Media Co. Sues Tax Advisers For $900K Over Bad Service

    A New York-based media and marketing company filed suit against its former tax advisers for more than $900,000 over a range of accounting failures and misrepresentations it claimed saddled the company with additional federal tax liabilities.

  • June 23, 2021

    Merchant & Gould Taps Two Partners To Lead Practice Group

    Intellectual property firm Merchant & Gould PC has tapped an Atlanta partner who has engineering experience and a Minneapolis partner who was a patent examiner in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to lead its patent design and trade dress group, the firm announced on Monday.

Expert Analysis

  • Patent Numbers May Be Declining, But Innovation Isn't

    Author Photo

    The 2020 decline in patents issued to eight out of 10 top filers at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office suggests that we may see further weakness in filing activity in the following years, but we should expect growth in the number of patents filed by emerging technology companies, says Pedram Sameni at Patexia.

  • Opinion

    Punishing Bar Exam Policies On Menstrual Products Must Go

    Author Photo

    Law graduates across the states are sitting for the grueling two-day bar exam this week despite menstruation-related barriers, such as inadequate menstrual product and bathroom access, which could be eradicated with simple policy tweaks, say law professors Elizabeth Cooper, Margaret Johnson and Marcy Karin.

  • It's Time For Law Firms To Start Loving And Leveraging Data

    Author Photo

    The volume and diversity of data managed by law firms today — from client files to internal financial records — may seem daunting, but when properly organized, good data can help practitioners stay competitive by providing sharper insight into firm resources and cost of work, say Jaron Luttich and Barry Wiggins at Element Standard.

  • Keys To Protecting Clients During Law Firm Dissolution

    Author Photo

    Whether a law firm dissolution is amicable or adversarial, departing attorneys should take steps to maintain their legal and ethical responsibilities toward clients, and beware client confidentiality pitfalls when joining new firms, say John Schmidt and Colin Fitzgerald at Phillips Lytle.

  • How Case Management Orders Can Support New Attorneys

    Author Photo

    Courts are leading the way in ensuring oral argument opportunities for newer attorneys by incorporating innovative language in a variety of orders, and private parties can and should follow suit by incorporating similar language into case management orders, say Megan Jones and Halli Spraggins at Hausfeld.

  • An In-House Counsel's Guide To Better Work Management

    Author Photo

    Amid economic uncertainty and increasing pressure on corporate legal departments to do more with less, work management processes should be aimed at tracking legal teams' every contribution, including routine matters that can be reallocated to nonlegal staff, says Aaron Pierce at LexisNexis CounselLink.

  • Avoiding Materially Adverse Conflicts After New ABA Opinion

    Author Photo

    The American Bar Association's recent guidance on what constitutes materially adverse interests between clients makes clear that lawyers should not take comfort in a current representation just because a former client is not on the opposite side of the v., and those hoping to avoid disqualification should consider five steps, says Hilary Gerzhoy at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Rebuttal

    US Legal System Can Benefit From Nonlawyer Ownership

    Author Photo

    Contrary to claims made in a recent Law360 guest article, nonlawyer ownership has incrementally improved the England and Wales legal system — with more innovation and more opportunities for lawyers — and there is no reason why those outcomes cannot also be achieved in the U.S., say Crispin Passmore at Passmore Consulting and Zachariah DeMeola at the University of Denver.

  • Building A Law Firm Knowledge Bank For Thought Leadership

    Author Photo

    Marketing professionals often do not have firsthand knowledge of current legal trends and client issues, so law firms need to commit to an ongoing knowledge extraction process — a series of steps to draw out attorney insights that can help marketers create effective and frequent thought leadership content, says Michelle Calcote King at Reputation Ink.

  • What The Biden Presidency Means For Class Actions

    Author Photo

    With Democrats now controlling Congress and the White House, class action litigation may flourish in the coming years — which will be good both for consumers and for well-behaving companies who would otherwise lose market share and profits to unpoliced cheaters, says Daniel Karon at Karon LLC.

  • Let's Emerge From The Pandemic As Legal Innovators

    Author Photo

    The pandemic forced a digital reckoning on the legal profession — which switched to remote workforces, paperless workflows and digital signatures seemingly overnight — and law firms and corporate legal departments can keep up the innovation momentum with three guiding principles, says Kevin Clem at HBR Consulting.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Recertification, Conflicts, Assumptions

    Author Photo

    In this month's bid protest roundup, Locke Bell and Markus Speidel at MoFo look at three U.S. Court of Federal Claims and U.S. Government Accountability Office decisions that emphasize that small businesses should recertify after an acquisition, that offerors should file conflict of interest protests early on, and that offerors should not make assumptions that may conflict with material solicitation requirements.

  • Anticipating Predictive Analytics' Potential Uses In Litigation

    Author Photo

    Predictive analytics — the marriage of statistics and machine learning now commonly used in litigation for document review and production — will soon likely bring exciting new uses in discovery and beyond, offering attorneys more data-driven ways to establish facts and predict case outcomes, say Richard Finkelman and Karl Schliep at Berkeley Research Group.

  • 10 Global Digital Markets Regulatory Issues To Watch

    Author Photo

    With more vigorous enforcement, a number of significant policy reviews and broader political movements, a diverse range of regulatory developments could affect operations for international businesses in the digital markets industry, say Francesco Liberatore and James Konidaris at Squire Patton.

  • Opinion

    This Black History Month, Law Firms Should Challenge Norms

    Author Photo

    With so little progress made in the diversification of the legal industry, Black History Month is a good time for law firms to adjust their organizational cultures, ensuring that diversity and inclusion goals are transparent and measured in the same way billable hour and other core targets are — through written, enforceable policies, says Paulette Brown at Locke Lord.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Telecommunications archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!