Telecommunications

  • August 03, 2021

    Ligado Says Gov't Has Pattern Of Support For 5G Plan

    Major federal agencies initially signed off on Ligado Networks' plan to build a wireless network in the L-band satellite airwaves nearly a decade ago, Ligado told the Federal Communications Commission on Tuesday, indicating that the underlying facts supporting Ligado's project have not changed despite recent pushback.

  • August 03, 2021

    What To Know About GOP Senators' Latest Data Privacy Push

    Republican senators are banding together to push for a national privacy law that would empower the Federal Trade Commission and state attorneys general to crack down on the unbridled storage, use and transfer of consumer data.

  • August 03, 2021

    Top 3 Groups Lobbying The FCC

    Policy requests at the Federal Communications Commission slowed to a trickle during the month of July as fewer lobbyists than usual offered input on matters before the agency, including a national security-focused equipment replacement program and pole attachment rules.

  • August 02, 2021

    Alphabet Board Beats Investors' Child Privacy Suit, For Now

    A California federal judge tossed with leave to amend Alphabet investors' suit accusing its board of directors of knowingly collecting kids' online data on YouTube in violation of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, ruling Friday that the shareholders hadn't sufficiently alleged that the directors acted in bad faith.

  • August 02, 2021

    Infrastructure Bill Targets Tribes With Roads, Enviro Spending

    A $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure package now being considered in the U.S. Senate features a number of provisions for Native American tribes, including funding to repair highways and bridges, expand broadband access, pay for water rights settlements and deal with the impacts of climate change.

  • August 02, 2021

    FCC Accuses Ex-Ala. Lawmaker Of Thwarting License Probe

    The Federal Communications Commission's Enforcement Bureau is asking an in-house administrative judge to keep a former broadcaster and Alabama House speaker from delaying a proceeding about whether he's fit to own a broadcast license.

  • August 02, 2021

    Senate Infrastructure Bill Would End Worker Retention Credits

    An employer tax credit used by struggling businesses to retain workers during the height of the coronavirus pandemic would be phased out three months early under a bipartisan infrastructure bill headed for a Senate vote this week.

  • August 02, 2021

    Ex-FTE CFO Accused Of $28M Theft Freed On $250K NY Bond

    A New York state court judge Monday released on bail a former FTE Networks Inc. chief financial officer facing a multimillion-dollar theft charge after the man voluntarily traveled from Florida to deny the allegations.

  • August 02, 2021

    $1.2T Senate Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill Braces For Hurdles

    The U.S. Senate late Sunday finalized an estimated $1.2 trillion, eight-year bipartisan bill to rebuild the nation's crumbling infrastructure with modernized highways, roads, bridges, railways and transit systems, spurring fierce debate and uncertainty over whether the legislation's ultimate success hinges on a separate $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation bill.

  • August 02, 2021

    Zoom Inks $85M Deal To End Users' 'Zoombombing' Suits

    Zoom users asked a California federal judge over the weekend to greenlight their $85 million deal resolving privacy and data security claims against the videoconferencing provider months after the court questioned the claims over data sharing and "Zoombombing" disruptions.

  • August 02, 2021

    Ex-Astros Owner Asks Texas Justices To End Fraud Suit

    The billionaire former owner of the Houston Astros is trying to undo lower court rulings declining to dismiss a lawsuit alleging he lied to get a better price for the team and its stake in a now-bankrupt regional sports network.

  • August 02, 2021

    UK To Make Digital Platforms Collect, Report Sellers' Data

    E-commerce players like Amazon.com, eBay and Uber would have to collect detailed personal data of U.K. sellers on their platforms and report it to HM Revenue & Customs under draft rules for which the agency is seeking public comments.

  • August 02, 2021

    Tech Co. Fights AT&T Bid To Disqualify Its Ex-BigLaw Attys

    AT&T can't stop a former Baker Botts LLP lawyer and two ex-Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP attorneys from working on a $450 million patent case against it just because they provided it legal services years before the disputed patent was ever crafted, a New York federal court heard.

  • August 02, 2021

    NE Energy Law Veteran Leaves Locke Lord For Day Pitney

    David W. Bogan, a longtime New England utility and energy lawyer, recently moved laterally from a partner position at Locke Lord LLP to another at Day Pitney LLP.

  • July 30, 2021

    Gov't Google Suits Implicate Trillions Of Pages Of Docs

    A dispute over when Google will produce samples of the journeys taken by search users highlights the enormous amount of raw data implicated in lawsuits brought by the U.S. Department of Justice and state attorneys general accusing the company of monopolizing search advertising.

  • July 30, 2021

    Sprint Says Phone Lease Cost Suit Belongs In Arbitration

    Sprint says that claims from two of its customers accusing the telecom company of misleading them about the true cost of its phone lease program belong in arbitration, not in California federal court.

  • July 30, 2021

    9th Circ. Backs Carrier's Tariff Rates In Verizon Row

    The Ninth Circuit partially granted Wide Voice LLC's petition to review a Federal Communication Commission order that declared the local exchange carrier's tariff rate unlawful due to charging of excessive step-down rates for Verizon.

  • July 30, 2021

    7th Circ. Lets UnitedHealthcare Arbitrate TCPA Suit

    An Illinois chiropractor was correctly ordered to arbitrate his seven-year-old claim that UnitedHealthcare sent him an unwanted fax in violation of federal law, the Seventh Circuit said Friday.

  • July 30, 2021

    FCC Urged To Let All Subsidy Programs Accept Telecom Gifts

    Broadband trade group USTelecom is joining educational groups in calling for the Federal Communications Commission to more consistently let schools accept donated telecom services, a pandemic relief measure the agency instituted last year but partially rolled back last month.

  • July 30, 2021

    Health Hires: Polsinelli, Buchalter, Allen & Overy

    Polsinelli PC has snapped up a new shareholder from Kaufman Borgeest & Ryan LLP in New York City, Buchalter PC has beefed up its health care practice in San Diego, and Allen & Overy LLP has added an intellectual property pro from Wiggin and Dana LLP, headlining Law360's latest roundup of personnel moves in the health care and life sciences arena.

  • July 30, 2021

    Biggest Merger Review Developments Of 2021 So Far

    The year started off with two high-profile deals abandoned in the face of pressure from U.S. enforcers determined to stop so-called killer acquisitions. Now, antitrust practitioners are waiting for decisions on a number of pending merger challenges. Here, Law360 looks at the major developments so far in 2021 as the new administration gears up for a busy second half.

  • July 30, 2021

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen Cantor Fitzgerald & Co. sue an Indian bank, eight insurers go after British construction giant John Wood, and Visa and MasterCard face new competition claims. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims filed in the U.K.

  • July 30, 2021

    Founder Of French Telecom Iliad Makes €3.1B Take-Private Bid

    The founder of French telecommunications service provider Iliad Group said Friday that he's launching a €3.1 billion ($3.7 billion) tender offer to acquire the remaining shares in the company he doesn't already own.

  • July 29, 2021

    InterDigital Wins 1st 4G Patent Trial Against Lenovo In UK

    InterDigital scored a victory in its patent battle with Lenovo when a London judge ruled Thursday in the first of a series of trials that the Chinese tech giant infringed a valid standard-essential patent for 4G wireless technology.

  • July 29, 2021

    Alphabet Investors Tell Judge Board Willfully Ignored COPPA

    Alphabet investors warned a California federal judge Thursday that he would set a "dangerous precedent" if he let Google and YouTube's parent company, Alphabet, and its top brass dodge a derivative action alleging that the tech behemoth knowingly collected children's online data in violation of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act.

Expert Analysis

  • Aviation Cos. Can't Put Trade Compliance On Autopilot

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    U.S. trade pressure against China, Russia and other countries will likely remain a key priority under the Biden administration, so aviation companies that export their products must calibrate their compliance programs to account for shifting policy, updated blacklists and the specialized sanctions and export controls risks facing the aviation industry, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • Law Firm Penalties On Departing Partners Just Got Riskier

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    A D.C. appeals court's recent decision in Jacobson Holman v. Gentner sharply limiting the ability of law firms to financially penalize departing partners continues a clear trend among court rulings and bar ethics opinions, and should encourage firms to review their partnership agreements for any ethical land mines, says Alan Kabat at Bernabei & Kabat.

  • 7 Takeaways From Recent Del. Statutory Appraisal Litigation

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    Statutory appraisal decisions from the Delaware Supreme Court and Court of Chancery over the last year continue to assign significant or entire weight to deal prices when there are sufficient indicia of reliability, and offer important considerations for practitioners and their clients, say Lewis Lazarus and Bryan Townsend at Morris James.

  • How Parties Can Prep For Global FRAND Jurisdictional Battles

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    As courts worldwide increasingly vie for jurisdiction in litigation over standard-essential patents licensed on fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory terms, parties should consider courts' capabilities, the local market's importance, and choice of law in their preferred venues, and carefully tailor remedy requests in complaints, says Brian Johnson at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • NJ Case Has Lessons On Arbitration Clauses In Atty Retainers

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    The New Jersey Supreme Court’s recent opinion in Delaney v. Dickey tracks and builds on other jurisdictions' limitations on the enforceability of arbitration provisions in law firm retainer agreements, and provides useful guidance for lawyers hoping to bind clients to arbitration, say attorneys at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Tips For Protecting Privilege When Working With Outside PR

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    As lawsuits stemming from companies' COVID-19 responses grow and businesses hire public relations firms to manage the fallout, companies and their counsel should consider strategies to best protect themselves in court — and in the court of public opinion — without stepping on a privilege land mine, say Daniella Main and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • 3 Procurement Priorities For Law Firms In Uncertain Times

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    As the pandemic and its associated economic disruption linger, law firm procurement teams should expand their objectives beyond purchasing and getting the best price for goods and services, to help firms become more nimble and achieve overarching strategic goals, says Lee Garbowitz at HBR Consulting.

  • An OFAC Compliance Checklist For Ransomware Payments

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    As the U.S. government heightens its scrutiny of ransomware payments, victims that pay extortion demands can follow 12 steps to help establish the requisite mitigation and due diligence to avoid penalties from the U.S. Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control, says cybersecurity consultant John Reed Stark.

  • Opinion

    UK Is Proof Nonlawyer Ownership Threatens Legal Profession

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    Advocates claim that nonlawyer ownership of law firms — now allowed in Arizona — will increase low-income Americans' access to legal services, but the reality in the U.K. demonstrates that nonlawyer owners are drawn to profitable areas like personal injury and create serious conflicts of interest, say Austin Bersinger and Nicola Rossi at Bersinger Law.

  • Opinion

    US Trade And Domestic Economic Policy Should Align

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    Progressive international trade policy should offer economic benefits not just to U.S. companies competing internationally, but also to the middle class, say Jeff Weiss at Steptoe & Johnson and Livia Lam at Strategies 360.

  • Del. M&A Ruling Shows Pragmatic View On Expert Reports

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    Although statements in an expert witness report are arguably hearsay, the Delaware Chancery Court’s recent decision to allow them in Comtech/Gilat Merger Litigation offers insight into an area where case law is relatively sparse, and suggests the court views written reports as a pragmatic means to a just and efficient outcome, say Joseph Thompson and Elise Scoles at The Griffing Group.

  • Remote Bar Exams Pose New Learning Disability Challenges

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    New bar exam formats necessitated by the COVID-19 crisis — going from paper to computer, in-person to remote, human to artificial intelligence proctoring — may exacerbate shortcomings in disability assessments for learning-disabled test takers seeking accommodations, says Rebecca Mannis at Ivy Prep.

  • OECD Delays Are Imperiling Digital Tax Deal

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    As the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development continues to push back its deadline for a digital tax overhaul, countries are beginning to pursue unilateral solutions and the negotiations are turning political, decreasing the likelihood of an agreement, says Joyce Beebe at Rice University.

  • New Ariz. Law Practice Rules May Jump-Start National Reform

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    Arizona's far-reaching new rules opening its legal sector up to nonlawyer participation may encourage other states to follow suit, with both positive and negative consequences for clients, the justice system, legal education and lawyers' careers, say Maya Steinitz at the University of Iowa and Victoria Sahani at Arizona State University.

  • 10 Tips For Your Next Virtual Court Appearance

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    Many federal and state courts will likely embrace virtual proceedings even after pandemic-related restrictions are lifted, so attorneys should get comfortable with the virtual platforms commonly used by courts, and follow a few audio and video best practices, says Justin Heminger, a senior litigation counsel at the U.S. Department of Justice.

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