Telecommunications

  • June 18, 2021

    Satellite Group Says FCC Fee Structure Is Unfair

    A satellite operators' coalition has urged the Federal Communications Commission to revisit a rule that splits satellites orbiting at lower altitudes into two categories for purposes of regulatory fees, saying one group is overly broad and faces disproportionate burdens.

  • June 18, 2021

    Ohio Focuses On Getting Google Declared A Common Carrier

    Ohio's attorney general is seeking to split up his brand-new state court lawsuit against Google, preferring to tackle a bid to declare the search giant as a common carrier first and only then turn to a measure to bar Google from promoting its own offerings over competitors' as "unfair discrimination."

  • June 18, 2021

    FCC Commissioner Carr Wary Of NTIA's New Broadband Map

    As the Federal Communications Commission mulls how to fix its lackluster broadband maps, the U.S. Department of Commerce's National Telecommunications and Information Administration has released its own digital map.

  • June 18, 2021

    Conservatives Split On Bipartisan House Antitrust Bills

    A coalition of conservative groups has come out swinging against major bipartisan antitrust proposals that could see key votes on Wednesday in the House Judiciary Committee, calling them "a deceitful attempt by Democrat lawmakers to exploit legitimate conservative anger over Big Tech."

  • June 18, 2021

    Louisiana AG Wants To Join Texas' Google Antitrust Suit

    Louisiana's attorney general has asked a Texas federal judge to let the Pelican State join an antitrust lawsuit from multiple states over Google's display advertising practices, saying it shares the same complaints against the online search giant.

  • June 18, 2021

    For FSF's Randy May, Free Market Advocacy Is A Life's Work

    Randolph May has seen a lot of changes in the media landscape, from his days of tuning in to Walter Cronkite's nightly broadcasts in his college fraternity house to parsing the finer points of Big Tech censorship disputes today.

  • June 18, 2021

    Colorado Adds Wrinkle To Emerging State Privacy Law Quilt

    Colorado is on the brink of becoming the third U.S. state to enact comprehensive consumer privacy legislation, a move that's set to throw a curveball at companies' compliance plans and give further ammunition to the push for a unified nationwide framework.

  • June 17, 2021

    Sens. Aim To Make Hacks A RICO Crime Amid Attack Spike

    Bipartisan U.S. senators on Thursday reintroduced a bill that would clear the way for prosecutors to charge alleged hackers under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, in a push coming after cyberattacks hit a critical pipeline and global meat supplier.

  • June 17, 2021

    Live Chat Co. Wins $30M In Jury Trial Over Trade Secrets Theft

    Sequoia Capital-backed customer service technology company [24]7.ai ripped off trade secrets belonging to rival LivePerson and engaged in unfair competition that helped it land contracts with heavyweights like Sears and Capital One, a California federal jury found Thursday, awarding the live chat company $30 million in damages.

  • June 17, 2021

    Charter Sues City Of Rochester Over Threats, Excessive Fees

    Charter Spectrum has slapped the city of Rochester, New York, with a lawsuit accusing the city of trying to circumvent the federal cap on franchise fees by tacking on additional charges that the cable company says are just franchise fees in disguise.

  • June 17, 2021

    FCC Upholds $2.86M Fine Over Sales Of Uncertified Drones

    A unanimous Federal Communications Commission on Thursday reaffirmed its decision to fine a drone marketer more than $2.86 million for "egregious" FCC violations that allegedly threatened to interfere with government and public safety radio signals.

  • June 17, 2021

    Top EU Court Rules ISPs Can Be Forced To Share User Info

    An alleged "copyright troll" can get Belgium internet service provider Telenet BVBA to produce identifying information on customers accused of sharing its pornographic videos through the BitTorrent file-sharing network, Europe's highest court ruled Thursday.

  • June 17, 2021

    Covington Nabs Sidley Austin IP Litigator To Boost DC Office

    Covington & Burling LLP has bolstered its patent litigation practice in Washington, D.C., adding a Sidley Austin LLP partner with more than 25 years of experience litigating intellectual property disputes on behalf of leading technology companies before the U.S. International Trade Commission and district court.

  • June 17, 2021

    Netflix Tells 7th Circ. That Ill. Fee Suit Supports Fed. Ruling

    Netflix, Hulu and other streaming services told the Seventh Circuit on Thursday that a new federal lawsuit in Illinois supported their request to keep an Indiana suit over streaming fees in federal court to resolve similar issues in both cases.

  • June 17, 2021

    Senate Confirms Citigroup Exec As DHS Deputy Secretary

    The Senate on Thursday easily confirmed John K. Tien, a Citigroup Inc. managing director with decades of military and national security experience, as deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

  • June 17, 2021

    Ex-Astros Owner Must Face Suit Over Ill-Fated Network Deal

    Billionaire former Houston Astros owner Drayton McLane Jr. and Comcast Corp. can't use a Texas free speech law to duck claims that they lied to get a better price for the team and its stake in a now-bankrupt regional sports network, a state appellate court held Thursday.

  • June 17, 2021

    Groups Fear Media Competition Bill Will Expand Copyright

    While Congress eyes a bill that would give journalism outlets limited antitrust immunity to team up to bargain with big tech platforms like Google, consumer advocacy groups are raising the alarm about language that might implicitly extend copyright protection to links and headlines.

  • June 17, 2021

    FCC Advances Plan To Stop Most Chinese Equipment Sales

    The Federal Communications Commission voted Thursday on a plan that could further restrict the flow of Chinese-made technologies into the U.S., kicking off a rulemaking to examine how the agency can hone its device approval rules "to help keep insecure devices off the market."

  • June 17, 2021

    FCC Calls Rate Cap On Toll-Free Call-Switching 'Reasonable'

    The Federal Communications Commission has urged the D.C. Circuit to uphold a disputed rate cap on toll-free call switching, which the FCC says is critical to reforming intercarrier fees and is opposed by a company that blasted it as a "Bridge to Nowhere."

  • June 17, 2021

    3rd Circ. Won't Rehear Suit Over 15-Year-Old BofA Robocall

    The Third Circuit won't give another chance to a plaintiff accusing Bank of America of violating the Telephone Consumer Protection Act with a single 2005 robocall, denying on Thursday a rehearing of the bank's earlier win.

  • June 17, 2021

    Trade Judges Press Government On Harm Of China Tariffs

    U.S. Court of International Trade judges posed sharp questions to the government on Thursday about the potential harm posed to importers if they cannot get refunds of tariffs paid on Chinese goods should their lawsuit against the levies succeed.

  • June 16, 2021

    Broadband Projects Must 'Stack' Income Streams, House Told

    Using a "capital stack" to build out broadband infrastructure that can be used by multiple service providers is probably the best way to get rural communities connected to the internet quickly and affordably, experts told members of the House Wednesday at a subcommittee hearing.

  • June 16, 2021

    HHS Secretary Becerra Defends $132B Budget Request

    In congressional testimony Wednesday on the Biden administration's proposed budget, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra emphasized HHS' commitment to women's reproductive health rights, and to boosting funds to fight the coronavirus pandemic and the worsening opioid crisis.

  • June 16, 2021

    FCC's Simington Proposes Wireless Security Improvements

    A Federal Communications Commission Republican said Wednesday his agency has a role to play in mitigating cyberattacks on critical infrastructure, suggesting industry coordination and a possible rulemaking could help the private sector hammer out wireless security best practices.

  • June 16, 2021

    Robbins Geller Wants To Fight FIFA Suit DQ At 2nd Circ.

    Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP has asked a New York federal judge to give the firm time to appeal his ruling that it committed fraud worthy of disqualification by failing to disclose short positions held by the lead plaintiff in a securities class action stemming from the FIFA corruption scandal, a request the defendant company said comes way too late.

Expert Analysis

  • Smaller Firms Need Employee Wellness Programs, Too

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    As we emerge from the pandemic, small and midsize firms — which offer an ideal setting for companywide connection — should follow in the footsteps of larger organizations and heed the American Bar Association’s recommendations by adopting well-being initiatives and appointing a chief wellness officer, says Janine Pollack at Calcaterra Pollack.

  • Opinion

    Antitrust Reform Should Focus On Targeted Solutions

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    Antitrust law can and should be updated to reflect the needs of our modern economic landscape by addressing specific areas where meaningful problems exist, but some proposals, like the call to overturn the consumer welfare standard, go too far, says Trace Mitchell at NetChoice.

  • How Ad Disputes Between Cos. Fuel Consumer Class Actions

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    Whether companies are bringing or defending claims of false advertising against competitors, they should recognize and anticipate the additional legal risk that may accrue from follow-on consumer actions, says Ross Weiner at Risk Settlements.

  • What Semiconductor Shortage Means For Patent Drafting

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    Since a critical shortage in the global supply of semiconductors could lead to an increase in U.S. capacity, semiconductor-related patent owners should consider directing more patent claims to manufacturing processes, manufacturing tools and intermediate structures, say Darren Smith and David Ben-Meir at Norton Rose.

  • Opinion

    CFAA And The High Court's Fight Against Overcriminalization

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    When confronted with a notoriously broad and somewhat out-of-date statute like the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, it is important for the judiciary to continue to protect defendants from prosecutors' tortured or extreme readings of these criminal laws — and that's what the U.S. Supreme Court did this month in Van Buren v. U.S., say Harry Sandick and Jacob Chefitz at Patterson Belknap.

  • Warnings And Guideposts From EU Sanctions Blocking Case

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    An advocate general's recent opinion in Bank Melli Iran v. Telekom Deutschland, a European Union sanctions blocking case, highlights serious new international regulatory compliance risks but also presents helpful guidance for navigating conflicting EU and U.S. rules, say Thomas Grant at Cambridge University and Scott Kieff at George Washington University.

  • Stop Networking, Start Relationship Marketing

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    USA 500 Clubs' Joe Chatham offers four tips for lawyers to get started with relationship marketing — an approach to business development that prioritizes authentic connections — and explains why it may be more helpful than traditional networking post-pandemic.

  • 7th Circ. Decision Highlights Difficulties Of 'No Harm' Cases

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    The Seventh Circuit's recent decision in Markakos v. Medicredit showcases the judiciary's struggle with whether it is usurping Congress' authority by questioning statutory penalties for "no harm" consumer protection violations, and highlights the need to resolve a growing circuit split on this issue, says Jason Stiehl at Loeb & Loeb.

  • What Attorneys Should Know About Fee Deferral

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    Milestone Consulting’s John Bair explores contingency-fee structuring considerations for attorneys, laying out the advantages — such as tax benefits and income control — as well as caveats and investment options.

  • Predictions On Pandemic's Lasting Impact On Legal Education

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    The pandemic accelerated the pace of technological change for legal education, and some of the changes to how law school courses are taught and on-campus interviews are conducted may be here to stay, says Leonard Baynes at the University of Houston.

  • Lawyer Perfectionism Is A Disease We Can Control

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    The pursuit of perfection that is prevalent among lawyers can lead to depression, anxiety and other mental health impacts, but new attorneys and industry leaders alike can take four steps to treat this malady, says Liam Montgomery at Williams & Connolly.

  • Opinion

    Gov't Must Resolve Uncertainty Over 'Twilight' Cell Towers

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    The Federal Communications Commission and Native American tribes are in disagreement over what to do with so-called twilight cell towers that predate environmental and historical preservation regulation, and the Biden administration should address this question as soon as possible, says Bozana Lundberg at Thompson Hine.

  • Snapchat Case May Offer Opening For Design Defect Plaintiffs

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent ruling in Lemmon v. Snap aligns with prior Communications Decency Act cases establishing internet platforms' immunity for third-party content, but may help plaintiffs who can show how a platform's design affected users negatively, say James Rotondo and Andrew Ammirati at Day Pitney.

  • 5 Tips To Help Your 2021 Summer Associates Succeed

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    Despite pandemic-related challenges this year, law firms can effectively train summer associates on writing and communicating — without investing more time than they ordinarily would, says Julie Schrager at Schiff Hardin.

  • Firms Should Use Surveys To Make Smart Legal Tech Choices

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    The utility of legal technology innovations may be limited without clear data and objectives from the outset, but targeted surveys can provide specific insights that enable law firms to adopt the most appropriate and efficient tech solutions, says Tim Scott at Frogslayer.

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