Transportation

  • February 16, 2018

    3 Things To Know About The 4th Circ.'s Travel Ban Ruling

    The Fourth Circuit on Thursday ruled against the third version of President Donald Trump’s travel ban in a sprawling 285-page decision, and we read all of it so you don’t have to. Here are three things to know about the ruling.

  • February 16, 2018

    Driver Files Sex Harass Suit Against Trucking Companies

    Trucking companies American Driver Resource and Navistar International Corp. subjected a female driver to sexual harassment, used racial epithets in her presence and then ignored her when she complained, according a suit filed in Illinois federal court Friday.

  • February 16, 2018

    Muni Market Shaken By Puerto Rico Special Revenues Ruling

    Municipal bonds secured by pledged special revenue streams have long been prized as safe bets, but a recent ruling in Puerto Rico’s restructuring cases that payment on those obligations is not required in bankruptcy has riled investors and left legal experts confounded over a largely untested Bankruptcy Code provision.

  • February 16, 2018

    Takata Wins Nod For Ch. 11 Plan Confirmation, $1.6B Sale

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge agreed Friday to confirm Takata’s Chapter 11 plan that centers on a $1.6 billion sale to Key Safety Systems Inc. and uses proceeds to pay victims of Takata's dangerously defective air-bag inflators, after hearing that the major creditor groups were all on board.

  • February 16, 2018

    Don't Let PennEast Pipeline Proceed, NJ Tells FERC

    New Jersey’s environmental watchdog and a state park board on Friday asked the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to reverse its decision to issue a conditional certificate for the $1 billion PennEast gas pipeline, saying FERC relied on “woefully insufficient data.”

  • February 16, 2018

    Insurer Says Utah Bank, Finance Co. Can't Duck Award

    Allied World Assurance urged federal courts in Utah and New York on Thursday to confirm an international arbitration award against the Bank of Utah and a finance company valued at $424,392 and argued that the separate cases should not be consolidated.

  • February 16, 2018

    NLRB Tees Up Misclassification Standard For Review

    The National Labor Relations Board on Thursday called for input on whether the agency should treat misclassifying a worker as an independent contractor as a violation of federal labor law — a “drastic departure from established precedent,” according to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

  • February 16, 2018

    Uber Driver Can't Sue Over Gun-Carrying Ban, Judge Says

    A Florida federal judge on Friday tossed an Uber driver’s proposed class action alleging the rideshare giant’s rule prohibiting drivers and passengers from carrying a gun violates their constitutional rights, finding that the driver has not claimed he’s been harmed by the policy and therefore can’t sue.

  • February 16, 2018

    Deals Rumor Mill: Uber, Walmart, Thomson Reuters

    Uber is reportedly getting ready to take a large stake in taxi and carpooling company Grab, Walmart is mulling a deal for a more than 40 percent stake in Flipkart, and $15 billion in financing is backing a Blackstone-led consortium’s $17 billion bid for Thomson Reuters’ financial and risk business.

  • February 16, 2018

    LAX Operator Unveils $4.5B Contract For Intra-Airport Transit

    The entity that manages Los Angeles International Airport said Thursday it has awarded a contract with an overall value of $4.5 billion to a group of construction firms to finance, build and operate a people-mover transit system at LAX that would link parking facilities and commuter rail lines to the central airport terminal.

  • February 16, 2018

    Syrian Family Pulls Unlawful Travel Ban Application Claims

    A U.S. citizen who claimed she was wrongfully kept from reuniting with her Syrian sister and other relatives after the Trump administration’s travel ban was allegedly applied to them withdrew the case she had filed in District of Columbia federal court Thursday.

  • February 16, 2018

    Nissan Trims Suit Over Defective Sunroof Class Action

    Nissan has succeeded in trimming some breach of warranty and unfair trade practices claims from a proposed class action in California federal court alleging its panoramic sunroofs are prone to “explosively” shatter as a result of defects in the glass.

  • February 16, 2018

    Uber Says 3rd Time Not Charm For Driver Data Hack Class

    Uber Technologies Inc. on Thursday urged a California federal judge to toss for good a third amended putative class action claiming Uber lied about a 2014 data breach that compromised drivers’ personal information, saying the lead plaintiffs still haven’t demonstrated they were immediately harmed by the hack.

  • February 16, 2018

    Honda Sued By Insurer Over Damage From Odyssey Fire

    Metropolitan Property and Casualty Insurance Co. has sued American Honda Motor Co. in New Jersey state court over a policyholder's car and house damage after a Honda Odyssey minivan allegedly burst into flames.

  • February 15, 2018

    ITC Says Delta's Bombardier Order Didn't Harm Boeing

    Several weeks after the U.S. International Trade Commission unanimously ruled that Bombardier’s C Series commercial jets — though unfairly subsidized and sold at below-market prices — were not threatening U.S. producer Boeing, it issued an opinion Wednesday saying Boeing wasn’t harmed when Delta ordered Canadian planes from Bombardier.

  • February 15, 2018

    DynCorp Still Hasn't Returned $5.1M Aircraft, Suit Says

    DynCorp International LLC removed to Florida federal court Thursday a lawsuit accusing the government contractor of owing more than $5 million under a lease for a turboprop airplane.

  • February 15, 2018

    Pa. Auto Leasing Co. Defaulted On $10.7M Loan, Bank Says

    KeyBank NA sued a car rental company in Pennsylvania federal court on Wednesday, accusing Fleetway Leasing Co. and an affiliate of defaulting on $10.7 million in loans and fraudulently inflating their performance numbers.

  • February 15, 2018

    Calsonic Reaches $11M Price-Fix Deal In Car Parts MDL

    A proposed class of car buyers said Thursday they have reached an $11 million settlement of their claims in multidistrict litigation that Japanese auto parts maker Calsonic Kansei Corp. was part of a conspiracy to fix prices for vehicle air conditioning systems.

  • February 15, 2018

    Deals Rumor Mill: Thomson Reuters, Seadrill, Petrobras

    Thomson Reuters' chairman reportedly had concerns about the Blackstone-led offer for its financial and risk business, offshore drilling giant Seadrill is nearing a restructuring deal with bondholders and shipyards, and Petrobras set a late-March deadline for offers for a majority stake in a gas pipeline network.

  • February 15, 2018

    Uber Drivers Win Class Cert. In Fair-Share Pay Suit

    A California federal judge on Wednesday certified a nationwide class of Uber drivers alleging the company’s upfront pricing model denies them their fair share of riders’ payments, a week after he described the suit as a “classic case of a class action” based on a form contract.

Expert Analysis

  • E-Commerce Boom Means New Roles For Shipping Companies

    Carlos Rodriguez

    The e-commerce explosion will continue in full force this year, and will bring transportation intermediaries — such as forwarders, non-vessel operating common carriers, customs brokers and indirect air carriers — more into the third-party logistics and fulfillment space. This is inevitable for those who intend to survive and grow, says Carlos Rodriguez of Husch Blackwell LLP.

  • Autonomous Drones: Set To Fly, But May Not Comply

    Sara Baxenberg

    A California company has unveiled a fully autonomous "selfie" drone, which promises to stay trained on a moving subject, capturing footage while avoiding any obstacles. But a drone that flies itself may run afoul of a number of Federal Aviation Administration regulations, even if it has fancy obstacle detection and personal tracking, say Sara Baxenberg and Joshua Turner of Wiley Rein LLP.

  • How Emerging Sources Of ESI Will Impact Discovery

    Charles McGee

    Late last year, the Sedona Conference released the third edition of its principles addressing electronic document production, updated to account for innovations like Snapchat and Twitter. It may be necessary for these principles to be updated more often in order to keep pace with technology, says Charles McGee III of Murphy & McGonigle LLP.

  • Car Seat Heaters Still Producing Burns — And Litigation

    Sean Kane

    Despite decades of research on safe temperature thresholds for car seat heaters, some automakers are still designing heaters to work in higher temperature ranges, still manufacturing heaters that get much hotter than their design specifications and still forgoing simple countermeasures that their peers have been implementing since the 1980s, say Sean Kane and Ellen Liberman of Safety Research & Strategies Inc.

  • Put The Brakes On Acceleration Bay Litigation Funder Ruling

    David Gallagher

    Last week, the District of Delaware raised eyebrows by ruling that documents provided to a litigation funder and its counsel in connection with their due diligence are categorically not attorney work product. Acceleration Bay v. Activision Blizzard seems to be a case of bad facts making bad law, says David Gallagher, investment manager and legal counsel for Bentham IMF.

  • Worker Classification Questions Remain Post-GrubHub Win

    Art Lambert

    A California federal judge implied that her recent decision in Lawson v. GrubHub was a close call, which suggests there is a tipping point where a driver moves from the independent contractor classification to the employee classification. However, when exactly that happens is still up in the air, says Art Lambert of Fisher Phillips.

  • Considerations For Attorneys Using Artificial Intelligence

    Ben Allgrove

    Artificial intelligence tools can empower attorneys to work more efficiently, deepen and broaden their areas of expertise, and provide increased value to clients, which in turn can improve legal transparency, dispute resolution and access to justice. But there are some common pitfalls already apparent in the legal industry, say Ben Allgrove and Yoon Chae of Baker McKenzie.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Duncan Reviews 'Justice And Empathy'

    Judge Allyson Duncan

    In "Justice and Empathy: Toward a Constitutional Ideal," the late Yale Law School professor Robert Burt makes a compelling case for the undeniable role of the courts in protecting the vulnerable and oppressed​. But the question of how the judiciary might conform to Burt’s expectations raises practical problems​, says U.S. Circuit Judge Allyson Duncan of the Fourth Circuit. ​

  • The Art Of The Litigation Funding Deal

    Julia Gewolb

    As litigation funding becomes more widespread, greater complexity and variability in funding deals are to be expected. All claimants should consider certain key questions on the economics of single-case funding when considering or comparing funding terms, says Julia Gewolb of Bentham IMF.

  • Aviation Update: Was 2017 Really The Safest Year Ever?

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    While improved procedures and automated systems have contributed to excellent airline safety in recent years, tragedies can still result from pilots’ failure to understand the limitations of those systems, as well as from poor crew resource management, demanding flying conditions and operational and maintenance issues at low-cost carriers, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and private pilot.