Transportation

  • December 8, 2017

    The Law Firms Of The 2017 MVPs

    Law360's MVP award goes to attorneys who have distinguished themselves from their peers in litigation, deals and other complex matters. Find the MVPs at your firm here.

  • December 8, 2017

    Law360 MVP Awards Go To Top Attorneys From 78 Firms

    The elite slate of attorneys chosen as Law360’s 2017 MVPs have distinguished themselves from their peers by securing hard-earned successes in high-stakes litigation, complex global matters and record-breaking deals.

  • December 8, 2017

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen a group of shipping companies sue Oman Insurance Co. PSC, RBC Trustees lodge a claim against UBS Employee Benefits Trust, and offshore law firm Appleby bring a confidential information suit against BBC and the Guardian. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • December 8, 2017

    FTC Wants In On Oral Args Over Seattle's Uber Union Law

    The Federal Trade Commission asked the Ninth Circuit on Thursday to allow the agency to participate in oral arguments in a challenge to Seattle's ordinance allowing Uber and Lyft drivers to unionize, saying the law runs afoul of the so-called state action doctrine and could lead to too many antitrust exemptions.

  • December 8, 2017

    Trump's Tweets Crop Up At 4th Circ. Travel Ban Arguments

    The Fourth Circuit on Friday heard oral arguments in an appeal over President Donald Trump’s latest travel ban, with some of the judges highlighting the president's recent tweets, capping off a week of appellate developments over the entry restrictions.

  • December 8, 2017

    Medicaid Scheme Lands NY Businessman 6-Year Sentence

    An Albany County Supreme Court justice slapped a New York transportation company’s owner with two to six years in prison for submitting over $50,000 worth of false Medicaid claims for transportation that never occurred, according to an announcement Friday from the state attorney general’s office.

  • December 8, 2017

    DC Circ. Doesn't Think Treasury Must Provide Privileged Docs

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday remanded back to district court an order that the U.S. Department of the Treasury must turn over evidence related to decisions it made in General Motors’ 2009 bankruptcy for a related pension plan dispute, saying the lower court had not explained why a privilege claim by the White House should be disregarded. 

  • December 8, 2017

    Cypriot Shipping Co. Seeks $5M Security During Arbitration

    A Cypriot charter shipping company asked a New Jersey federal court Thursday to allow it to access funds or property connected to a group of related agribusiness companies with operations in the U.S. and the United Arab Emirates that could provide it with security of more than $5 million while it pursues arbitration against the companies over an alleged contract breach.

  • December 8, 2017

    Waymo, Uber Won't Agree to Back Special Master's Findings

    Neither Waymo nor Uber will agree to a California federal judge's request that they not challenge a special master's findings in a dispute over a letter sent to Uber's lawyers, the companies said in separate Thursday filings in Waymo's broader case over Uber's alleged theft of self-driving car trade secrets.

  • December 8, 2017

    DC Metro's $6.5M Discrimination Deal Scores Early OK

    A D.C. federal judge on Thursday gave preliminary approval to a $6.5 million settlement in a certified class action alleging Metrorail’s criminal background check policy disproportionately discriminated against African-Americans.

  • December 8, 2017

    DOT Yanks Obama-Era Airline Fee Disclosure Proposals

    The U.S. Department of Transportation pulled a pair of Obama-era proposals that would have forced airlines to tell consumers about baggage fees at the beginning rather than the end of a ticket purchase and to report revenues from add-on fees, according to a notice Thursday.

  • December 8, 2017

    State-Based Volvo Sunroof Classes Still Need Definition

    Drivers alleging Volvo Car Corp. sold vehicles with defective sunroofs must take another stab at getting their proposed state-based subclasses certified because they’re too poorly defined to meet the ascertainability requirement for the lawsuit to advance, a New Jersey federal judge said Wednesday.

  • December 8, 2017

    EU Antitrust Chief Cites Deep Worries About Lufthansa Deal

    The European Union’s chief antitrust enforcer on Friday cited “deep competition concerns” about Deutsche Lufthansa AG’s proposal to buy €210 million ($247 million) in assets from beleaguered rival Air Berlin PLC.

  • December 7, 2017

    Tesla Scores Win In Mo. Appeal Of Direct Sales Dispute

    Tesla can sell its electric cars directly to consumers in Missouri again after a state appeals court on Tuesday reversed a lower court’s decision blocking the licenses that Tesla received to sell its cars, saying a dealership association didn’t have standing to challenge the licenses in the first place.

  • December 7, 2017

    VW Plea Deal Gives Investors Limited Win In Fraud Case

    A California federal judge hearing cases related to Volkswagen AG’s clean diesel scandal ruled Wednesday that investors cannot cite the automaker's plea deal and admissions to prosecutors as proof that dozens of its statements to investors were false or made with scienter, although he found they did contradict the automaker’s statements printed on its engines.

  • December 7, 2017

    Enterprise Resolves Proposed Class Action Over Toll Charges

    Enterprise Rent-a-Car and one of its customers have resolved a proposed class action claiming the company refused to refund charges for a toll violation despite receiving proof he had paid the toll with his E-ZPass, according to an agreement filed Wednesday in New Jersey federal court.

  • December 7, 2017

    High Court Asked To Review Rail Stock-Options Tax Case

    The government Wednesday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a Seventh Circuit decision finding income from stock options provided to employees of a Canadian railroad company to be taxable compensation. The U.S. said a circuit split over the issue needed to be resolved.

  • December 7, 2017

    Arctic Cat Jury Snows Over Bombardier’s Patents

    A Minnesota federal jury struck down claims on a pair of snowmobile patents Bombardier had asserted against Arctic Cat on Wednesday, one day before the Federal Circuit threw into doubt part of a nearly $50 million infringement win Arctic Cat had scored against Bombardier over jet ski steering technology.

  • December 7, 2017

    Georgia-Pacific Breached $1.9M Sale Deal, 1st Circ. Told

    A Massachusetts federal court was wrong to dismiss a lawsuit accusing Georgia-Pacific LLC of breaching an agreement to sell 88 railroad cars to a Massachusetts real estate company for $1.9 million, the real estate company told the First Circuit on Wednesday.

  • December 7, 2017

    Pa. Auditor General Rips Philly Parking Authority Board

    The board of the Philadelphia Parking Authority failed to properly oversee the tenure of a former executive director who ran the agency like a personal fiefdom before resigning in 2016 amid sexual harassment allegations, according to two separate reports released Thursday by Pennsylvania's auditor general.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: The Untold Story Of The Resource Guide

    Charles Duross

    Much has been written about the 2012 "Resource Guide to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act," but no one has talked about the behind-the-scenes work that produced the guide — until now, say Charles Duross, former chief of the FCPA Unit at the U.S. Department of Justice, and Kara Novaco Brockmeyer, former chief of the FCPA Unit at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • Is Your Company Ready For Artificial Intelligence?

    Erin Bosman

    Evolving technologies such as artificial intelligence will change countless aspects of how companies do business. Consumer product companies ceding control to technology should weigh efficiencies against the risks posed by such novel movements, say attorneys at Morrison & Foerster LLP.

  • EPA Maintains Renewable Fuel Standard Status Quo, For Now

    Joel Beauvais

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Renewable Fuel Standard program has been the subject of considerable controversy this year, with important developments across all three branches of government. Joel Beauvais and Steven Croley of Latham & Watkins LLP analyze key elements of two recent EPA actions in this area, and highlight one of the looming questions for the program.

  • IP Protection Tips For Connected And Autonomous Vehicles

    Clinton Brannon

    The best intellectual property strategy to protect connected and autonomous vehicle developments will depend on multiple factors. With appropriate planning, a company may successfully employ a strategy involving both patents and trade secrets to maximize the chances of protecting innovation, say attorneys with Mayer Brown LLP.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: A Journey From Conviction To Dismissal

    Janet Levine

    The twist in the Lindsey Manufacturing Foreign Corrupt Practices Act case was the truncated time in which we prepared. Having refused to waive their rights to a speedy trial, our clients took control of the case — this, along with the compressed time frame, forced the government to make errors, say Janet Levine, Sima Namiri-Kalantari and Megan Weisgerber of Crowell & Moring LLP.

  • Immigration Compliance For Employers: Lessons From 2017

    Maria Kallmeyer

    The year is coming to a close without congressional immigration reform, yet employers have experienced significant changes this year. Maria Kallmeyer and Emily Shircel of Quarles & Brady LLP discuss the changes we've seen so far, how they impact employers and what the business immigration landscape might look like in 2018.

  • How DOE's 'Grid Resiliency' Policy May Impact Gas Markets

    Chip Moldenhauer

    At the behest of the U.S. Department of Energy, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is soon expected to release an interim rule that subsidizes power plants that hold 90 days of fuel supply on site — i.e., coal-fired and nuclear plants — and effectively penalizes gas-fired plants. But FERC has an opportunity to mitigate the threat to gas-fired generators, says Chip Moldenhaeur of LawIQ.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: The Siemens Lesson — Tillerson Is Right

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    Since its whopping $800 million Foreign Corrupt Practices Act settlement in 2008, Siemens cleaned up — and it has “cleaned up” in its long-standing competition with General Electric. How? As Secretary of State Rex Tillerson reportedly told President Donald Trump, you don’t need to pay bribes to succeed in international business, says Peter Y. Solmssen, former general counsel of Siemens.

  • High Court's Latest Travel Ban Ruling Lacks Details

    Tahanie Aboushi

    On Monday the U.S. Supreme Court lifted all stays on the third version of President Trump's travel ban. The paragraph-long ruling was devoid of limitations on the wide discretion available when deciding whether or not to bar an individual, which essentially leaves U.S. customs agents, defense counsel and those affected by the order to decipher the logistics as they go, says Tahanie Aboushi of The Aboushi Law Firm.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: The Rise In International Enforcement

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    The 2008 Siemens matter — then the largest sanction ever imposed in a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action — set the stage for future cross-collaboration in global anti-corruption enforcement, say Cheryl Scarboro, former chief of the FCPA Unit at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, and Diana Wielocha of Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP.