White Collar

  • July 29, 2020

    Transport Cos. Fined $750K In Crystal Geyser Arsenic Case

    A California federal judge Wednesday ordered two family-owned hazardous wastewater and stormwater transportation companies to each pay a $375,000 fine after they pled guilty to violating the Clean Water Act by transporting wastewater for the producer of Crystal Geyser Alpine Spring Water without identifying the arsenic in the waste.

  • July 29, 2020

    Feds Say Recusal Bid 'Grossly Distorts' Judge's Statements

    Federal prosecutors in New York on Tuesday said a Turkish bank accused of facilitating sanctions evasion "grossly" distorted the statements of the judge handling its case in service of its request for the judge's recusal.

  • July 29, 2020

    California's Pot Regulator Fights DEA's Subpoena Bid

    California's Bureau of Cannabis Control said on Wednesday that it should not be forced to turn over documents regarding state cannabis entities to federal drug enforcers since the investigators had failed to show that the material was relevant to its probe.

  • July 29, 2020

    IBM Report Finds Nation-State-Backed Breaches Most Costly

    Cyberattacks carried out by actors believed to be backed by nation-states are the most expensive type of data breach, costing victims an average of $4.43 million, according to a report released Wednesday by IBM.

  • July 29, 2020

    Firms Weren't 'Deprived' Of Lawyers' Letter In Tax Fraud Case

    A letter containing legal advice from a CFO-turned-IRS informant to a CEO later charged with tax fraud can't be returned to three of the CEO's other companies because they already had copies of it and weren't deprived of any protected attorney-client communication it contained, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled Wednesday.

  • July 29, 2020

    Feds Say NJ Marine Equipment Co. Sent Wrong Ship Parts

    Three employees of a New Jersey maritime equipment company allegedly defrauded the U.S. Department of Defense by fulfilling Naval vessel contracts with unauthorized replacement parts, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • July 29, 2020

    'Hypocrite' Financier Gets 6 Months In 'Varsity Blues' Scheme

    A "Varsity Blues" defendant's work to aid disadvantaged children makes him a "hypocrite" for greasing his own kid's way into Georgetown University through bribes, a federal judge said Wednesday, but the charity also helped knock down his prison sentence from potentially over a year to six months.

  • July 29, 2020

    Ex-State Dept. Official Sued Over Alleged Greek Pot Scam

    A U.K. businessman has accused a former high-level official in President Donald Trump's State Department and his associates of stealing nearly $10 million from him in a Greek medical marijuana scam.

  • July 29, 2020

    Ex-Construction Exec Admits Hiding $1.5M In Bribes From IRS

    Former Turner Construction executive Ronald Olson copped to tax evasion in Manhattan federal court Wednesday, telling a judge he stiffed the IRS on $1.5 million of payments described by prosecutors as bribes from a subcontractor in exchange for work at a Bloomberg office building.

  • July 29, 2020

    Binary Options Trading Fraudster Looking At $12M Judgment

    A Hawaii magistrate judge recommended a $12 million default judgment Tuesday against a man who the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission said scammed customers with ad campaigns touting unregistered binary options trading websites.

  • July 29, 2020

    Feds Want Ex-Uber Exec To Get Over 2 Years For IP Theft

    Federal prosecutors asked U.S. District Judge William Alsup on Tuesday to sentence bankrupt former Uber Technologies Inc. executive Anthony Levandowski to 27 months in prison for one count of stealing Google's trade secrets, while Levandowski argued he deserves at most a year of home confinement.

  • July 29, 2020

    1st Circ. Doubts Privilege Blocks ICE Courthouse Arrests

    The First Circuit voiced skepticism Wednesday that a common law privilege bans U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement from making civil arrests in state courthouses, questioning why such a carveout had never appeared in prior case law if it is so well understood.

  • July 28, 2020

    NYC's 1st Pandemic Jury Trial: Masks, Murmurs, Wary Jurors

    The Bronx cold case murder trial on Tuesday featured a masked judge, jurors, attorneys, and spectators, all wrestling with an array of challenges caused by the panoply of precautions rolled out to help jumpstart jury trials stalled since March after the state court system largely shut down in-person proceedings.

  • July 28, 2020

    Federal Judge Axes Suit Over NY Courts Reopening Plan

    A federal judge in Manhattan tossed a lawsuit seeking to block New York's state court administrators from going forward with a recent return to in-person criminal proceedings in New York City, saying it wasn't the place of the federal judiciary to interfere in a state-level issue.

  • July 28, 2020

    Harvard Prof Accused Of Failing To Report Wuhan Income

    A Harvard University chemistry professor has been hit with more charges over allegedly failing to report significant income he received from the Wuhan University of Technology in China, according to a superseding indictment handed down by a federal grand jury in Boston on Tuesday.

  • July 28, 2020

    AG Barr Fights Dems' Claims Of Political Interference At DOJ

    Attorney General William Barr engaged in a shouting match Tuesday while facing brutal questioning from House Democrats, denying claims he's politicizing the U.S. Department of Justice to boost President Donald Trump's reelection bid and allegations he gave special leniency to Trump allies charged in the Russia probe, which he called a "bogus 'Russiagate' scandal."

  • July 28, 2020

    Feds Seek Prison For Panama Papers Accountant, Client

    Prosecutors are seeking more than two years in prison for a private equity magnate and his former accountant whose $3.4 million tax dodge was exposed in the Panama Papers, saying the two elderly men need to serve significant time to promote respect for U.S. tax law.

  • July 28, 2020

    Bankers Deny Trying To 'Bust Out' Of $1M In Loans

    Two HSBC bankers pled not guilty Tuesday after the Manhattan U.S. Attorney's office accused them of scheming to get $1 million of commercial loans, the proceeds of which one of the bankers allegedly thought he could "bust out" — or never repay.

  • July 28, 2020

    FirstEnergy Hit With Stock-Drop Suit For $60M Bribery Reveal

    A shareholder hit FirstEnergy Corp. with a proposed class action in an Ohio federal court Tuesday over allegations that the utility paid Ohio lawmakers $60 million to arrange a $1 billion bailout, saying news of the charges sent the company's stock price plunging 45%.

  • July 28, 2020

    Co-Conspirator In Co-Working Ponzi Scheme Gets 4 Years

    A British citizen who aided in a ploy to defraud hundreds of investors out of $40 million by invoking a trendy co-working start-up was handed a four-year prison sentence on Monday in New York federal court.

  • July 28, 2020

    No Sanctions For Sharing Info With DA In Trade Secret Fight

    An oil and gas staffing company shouldn't be sanctioned for turning over to a district attorney and criminal attorney information about a competitor that it learned through civil discovery in a trade secrets lawsuit, a Colorado federal magistrate judge said.

  • July 28, 2020

    Customers Sue ComEd In Wake Of Bribery Scheme Settlement

    Commonwealth Edison Co. was hit with putative class actions this week in Illinois state and federal court from customers who claim they paid higher electrical bills after the utility bribed public officials to ensure the passage of legislation benefiting the company.

  • July 28, 2020

    Noted Atty Ripped By Judge For Interrupting, Blames Zoom

    Prominent white-collar defense attorney Abbe Lowell was chastised by a Massachusetts federal judge on Tuesday for repeatedly interrupting her during a Zoom hearing, prompting the lawyer to apologize and blame delays caused by the videoconference platform.

  • July 28, 2020

    Regions Bank Says Investor Kited Checks To Cover Fraud

    Regions Bank NA urged the Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday to reverse a district court decision clearing an investor in a Ponzi scheme of knowingly kiting checks to cover up the fraud, arguing it had presented a "mountain of evidence" that the investor knew the checks had insufficient funds.

  • July 28, 2020

    Securities Trader Pleads Guilty To $17M Market Manipulation

    A securities trader pled guilty in New Jersey federal court Tuesday to securities fraud and conspiracy to defraud the United States, admitting to orchestrating a long-running market manipulation and tax fraud scheme that netted more than $17 million in illegal profits, federal prosecutors say.

Expert Analysis

  • Cybersecurity Steps For Law Firms Amid Heightened Risks

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    With large swaths of the population indoors and primarily online, cybercriminals will be able to exploit law firms more easily now than ever before, but some basic precautions can help, says Joel Wallenstrom at Wickr.

  • Madoff Recovery's Next Steps After Justices' Petition Pass

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent refusal to review a Second Circuit decision allowing recovery of funds Bernie Madoff transferred outside the U.S. leaves open the question of whether the clawback initiative’s claims will survive given the strict pleading and proof standards that have evolved over the last 12 years of litigation, say attorneys at Quarles & Brady.

  • An Inside Look At DOJ Fight Against COVID-19 Price-Gouging

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    New Jersey U.S. Attorney Craig Carpenito and Assistant U.S. Attorney Nicholas Grippo share how the U.S. Department of Justice is combating hoarding and price-gouging of medical supplies and analyze some of the prosecutions a new task force has brought during the pandemic.

  • The Research Compliance Landscape Is Evolving Quickly

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    Government actions against researchers with undisclosed connections to China, as well as legislation designed to safeguard U.S. research, reinforce the probability that new rules for global collaboration and foreign engagement are on the horizon, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Opinion

    It's Time For Law Firms To Support Work-From-Home Culture

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    Now that law firms are on board with fully remote work environments, they must develop policies that match in-office culture and align partner and associate expectations, says Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • Opinion

    Republicans Keep Confirming Unqualified Judicial Nominees

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    What emerges from the group of 200 federal judges confirmed by the Senate under President Donald Trump is a judiciary stacked with young conservative ideologues, many of whom lack basic judicial qualifications, says Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

  • Tips For Crafting The Perfect Law Firm Alert

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    As lawyers have had more time to write in recent weeks, the number of law firm alerts has increased massively, but a lot of them fail to capture readers and deliver new business, says Richard Torrenzano at The Torrenzano Group.

  • What Ebola Crisis Can Teach Us About COVID-19 Compliance

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    What occurred during and as a result of the Ebola outbreak is informative of what companies may face in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, including fraud related to charitable donations, government contracts and border crossings, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • PPP Fraud Actions Highlight Importance Of Lender Vigilance

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's first wave of enforcement actions against individuals fraudulently seeking Paycheck Protection Program loans demonstrates the key role that financial institutions play in monitoring and reporting suspicious applications, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Sanctions Order May Accelerate Decline In US-ICC Relations

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    President Donald Trump's recent executive order authorizing sanctions against participants in the International Criminal Court investigation of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan may be intended as a warning, but could become another point of contention for EU states that are increasingly frustrated with U.S. sanctions policy, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Elrod Reviews 'Shortlisted'

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    Renee Knake Jefferson and Hannah Brenner Johnson's new book, "Shortlisted: Women in the Shadows of the Supreme Court," is a service to an overlooked group of nine women who were considered for the U.S. Supreme Court before Justice Sandra Day O'Connor was confirmed, and offers constructive tips for women looking to break through the glass ceiling, says Fifth Circuit Judge Jennifer Elrod.

  • Mandatory State Bars Likely To Remain Intact, For Now

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    A Texas federal judge’s recent holding in McDonald v. Sorrels that mandatory bar memberships do not violate members' constitutional rights indicates that such requirements survive the U.S. Supreme Court's 2018 decision in Janus, but it may mean that the Supreme Court will address the issue in the not-too-distant future, say Majed Nachawati and Misty Farris at Fears Nachawati.

  • Perspectives

    Unfairness In Prisoner Litigation Is Baked Into Statute

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    Inmate litigants have a new hurdle to clear because of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision this month in Lomax v. Ortiz-Marquez, but the court merely did as Congress said in the Prison Litigation Reform Act, says David Shapiro at the Roderick and Solange MacArthur Justice Center.

  • The Law Behind The Strange Departure Of US Atty Berman

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    In the wake of this weekend's confusing, contradicting statements regarding the removal of Geoffrey Berman as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, it is useful to ask what law governs here, why the standoff with Attorney General William Barr ended the way it did, and what history teaches us about these circumstances, says Daniel Levy at McKool Smith.

  • 11 Keys To Success At Remote Mediation

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    Attorneys should accept that remote mediation may be their only current option for resolving a dispute and take steps to obtain a fantastic outcome for their clients, including making sure the right people attend the remote mediation and beginning the session with an apology, says Eric Meyer at FisherBroyles.

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