White Collar

  • July 24, 2020

    Startup Founder Charged With $18.5M Investment Scam

    Federal prosecutors on Friday charged the founder of a Virginia tech startup with wire and securities fraud and money laundering for allegedly bilking 90 investors out of $18.5 million, the same day the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filed a civil complaint in Virginia federal court for the alleged scheme.

  • July 24, 2020

    DC Court Rules Alleged Crypto Launderer Dealt In 'Money'

    A Washington, D.C., district court struck down an Ohio man's attempts to escape charges tied to the alleged darknet cryptocurrency laundering operation he ran, ruling that the more than 350,000 bitcoins he transferred are "money" and subject to federal money transmission laws.

  • July 24, 2020

    Pittsburgh Courts Close As Another Attorney Catches Virus

    The president judge of Pennsylvania's Fifth Judicial District, which covers Pittsburgh and Allegheny County, ordered parts of the criminal, family and magisterial district courts temporarily closed and suspended all in-person criminal court hearings Friday after another attorney there tested positive for COVID-19.

  • July 24, 2020

    Congressional Action On McGirt May Prove Risky For Tribes

    A plan to enlist Congress to help settle the jurisdiction questions raised by the Muscogee (Creek) Nation's recent U.S. Supreme Court win risks weakening tribes' authority over their newly affirmed reservation lands in Oklahoma, and federal legislation might not be needed at all if tribes and the state take the time to hash things out themselves, experts say.

  • July 24, 2020

    Ex-Bloomberg Construction Boss Gets 2 Years In Bribe Case

    Former Bloomberg LP construction manager Michael Campana was sentenced to two years in prison on Friday for dodging taxes on hundreds of thousands in kickbacks from subcontractors.

  • July 24, 2020

    Insurer Must Cover Sherwin-Williams Ex-Worker's $3.5M Theft

    A Minnesota federal judge has said Beazley Insurance Co. must face Sherwin-Williams Co.'s suit seeking coverage for losses sustained when a former employee stole $3.5 million through inflated invoices, holding the paint company's policy exclusions do not apply.

  • July 24, 2020

    Nigerian Man Pleads Not Guilty To Bitcoin Fraud Scheme

    A Nigerian man on Friday pled not guilty to charges that he orchestrated a scheme to defraud seven American companies by gaining unauthorized access to their email accounts, requesting wire transfers that appeared to be legitimate and attempting to convert fraud proceeds to bitcoin for personal use. 

  • July 24, 2020

    Feds Want Limited Pause In Investors' Cognizant Bribe Suit

    The government has urged a New Jersey federal court to mostly halt a proposed securities class action against Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp. over an alleged bribery scheme involving two former company executives until a related criminal case is concluded, but the business would still need to turn over documents it gave prosecutors.

  • July 24, 2020

    Goldman Sachs Strikes $3.9B Deal With Malaysia Over 1MDB

    Goldman Sachs has agreed to a $3.9 billion settlement of the Malaysian government's criminal case over the bank's role in the 1Malaysia Development Bhd. scandal, the country's finance minister announced Friday.

  • July 24, 2020

    Indivior To Pay $600M To Settle Suboxone Charges

    Indivior PLC said Friday it has agreed to pay $600 million to settle charges related to its opioid treatment Suboxone, ending litigation and investigations into claims about the safety of the drug's film form that enforcers say constituted fraud and unfair competition.

  • July 24, 2020

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen Hermes and other retailers hit MasterCard with an antitrust suit, a packaged baked goods maker sue BNP Paribas and two fintechs go to court. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • July 23, 2020

    Ohio Corruption Case Muddles Power Co.'s Bankruptcy Exit

    An alleged $60 million bribery scheme connected to Ohio's decision to bail out coal and nuclear power plants raises a thicket of potential trouble for the successor to FirstEnergy Solutions, which owns the bailed out plants and recently emerged from bankruptcy.

  • July 23, 2020

    Dems Move Bills To Rein In President's Power To Defy Probes

    A bitterly divided House Judiciary Committee moved bills Thursday to make it easier to bring criminal charges against ex-presidents and require the U.S. Department of Justice to share information about probes that lead to a pardon of anyone in the chief executive's family.

  • July 23, 2020

    Huawei Judge Denies Expanded Doc Share With Fugitive CFO

    The New York federal judge overseeing a case accusing Huawei of Iran sanctions violations, bank fraud and other charges on Thursday refused to expand what discovery from the case the Chinese telecommunications giant can share with its fugitive chief financial officer, who is fighting her extradition to the U.S. from Canada.

  • July 23, 2020

    Taro Settles DOJ Price Fixing Charges, Will Pay $205M Penalty

    Generics maker Taro Pharmaceuticals U.S.A. Inc. has agreed to pay a $205.7 million criminal penalty to settle charges that it conspired to fix prices, the U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday, in the 10th case stemming from the agency's ongoing investigation into the industry.

  • July 23, 2020

    New Epstein Docs Unsealed As Maxwell Fails To Gag Boies

    Former Jeffrey Epstein associate Ghislaine Maxwell suffered a pair of courtroom setbacks Thursday morning, losing a bid to gag federal prosecutors and lawyers for witnesses in her sex trafficking case, and failing to convince a judge in a defamation suit to keep a trove of documents under seal.

  • July 23, 2020

    Ghosn's Son Paid Ex-Green Beret $500K Via Bitcoin, Feds Say

    Prosecutors opposing the release of a former Green Beret and his son while they battle extradition to Japan have said the son of former Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn paid the pair $500,000 through the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, in addition to $862,500 in wire transfers already disclosed, in the months leading up to Ghosn's brazen escape.

  • July 23, 2020

    Ex-Exec Gets 2 Years For $5.8M Fraud With Escort Girlfriend

    A former Illinois executive who handed over a company credit card and helped spend $5.8 million of his former employer's money on jewelry, lavish San Diego housing and other luxuries that benefited his escort-turned-girlfriend was sentenced Thursday to 25 months in prison.

  • July 23, 2020

    Ex-Pa. Rep. Charged In Judicial Race Ballot Stuffing Scandal

    An ex-Philadelphia congressman who served prison time stemming from a bribery scandal in the 1970s was slapped with new federal charges on Thursday alleging that he bribed a local elections official to stuff the ballot box for three unnamed judicial candidates in the city.

  • July 23, 2020

    Ex-Raytheon Worker Gets 18 Months For Keeping Military Info

    A federal judge in Massachusetts on Wednesday handed a former Raytheon systems engineer an 18-month prison sentence for taking home 31,000 pages of classified material, some of which included sensitive information related to missile defense.

  • July 23, 2020

    'Varsity Blues' Judge Rejects 'Gratuitous' Bid To Split Up Trial

    A group of parents ensnared in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scandal can't split the case into separate trials, a Boston federal judge ruled Wednesday, saying severance would be "gratuitous" and "extremely costly" to the government and the courts.

  • July 23, 2020

    CNN, BuzzFeed Call Withholding Of Mueller Info 'Misconduct'

    An attorney for CNN and BuzzFeed claimed during a D.C. federal court hearing Thursday the federal government's withholding of certain details in witness interview memos produced by special counsel Robert Mueller's probe into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election was part of its effort to "paint a one-sided picture" that would discredit the investigation.

  • July 23, 2020

    Ex-Cop In George Floyd Killing Evaded Tax, Minn. Court Told

    Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer charged in the killing of George Floyd, failed to timely file Minnesota tax returns and filed fraudulent returns, a county attorney told a state court in bringing felony charges against Chauvin.

  • July 23, 2020

    Texas Hospital Wants Coverage For Employee's $2M Scam

    A Texas hospital is suing its insurance company, saying it was wrongfully denied coverage after an employee allegedly stole nearly $2 million by making fraudulent orders for medical supplies.

  • July 23, 2020

    Cohen Wins Release As Judge Says US Retaliated Over Book

    A Manhattan federal judge on Thursday granted home confinement to Donald Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen, finding federal authorities retaliated against him when he was jailed two weeks ago after he asked questions about a demand that he not publish a book about the president while subject to probation.

Expert Analysis

  • Flynn's False Statement Charge Reveals Failed Investigation

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    The U.S. government's charges against Michael Flynn for lying to federal agents shine a light on one of the most misused tools prosecutors deploy to salvage otherwise failed investigations and should generate skepticism from the U.S. Department of Justice and courts, says Simon Gaugush at Carlton Fields.

  • Will Companies' COVID-19 Efforts Sway Juries?

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    Glenn Kuper and Jeffrey Jarman at Tsongas Litigation Consulting share findings from their recent study investigating the influence of pandemic-related corporate good behavior on trial outcomes.

  • Keys To A Thriving Biz Development Culture At Your Law Firm

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    As law firms continue to experience the economic impact of the COVID-19 crisis, it is more important than ever that they reduce reliance on just a few rainmakers and foster a culture that makes business development a way of life for everyone — from junior associates to senior partners, says Elise Holtzman at The Lawyer's Edge.

  • Opinion

    Virus, 'Tiger King' Point To Need For Wildlife Trafficking Law

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    The unlikely combination of the COVID-19 pandemic and a sensational Netflix documentary series has highlighted, like never before, the threat that illegal wildlife trafficking poses to both humans and animals — and has made clear the urgent need for legislation that will treat this activity as organized crime, says Thomas Firestone at Baker McKenzie.

  • How Video Mediation Can Help Us Serve Clients Better

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    Mediation in recent years has largely devolved into a kind of arbitration without due process — where a mediator reads briefs, decides where the case should settle, and drives parties toward that single-minded result — but online mediation can be steered in a different direction, says mediator Jeff Kichaven.

  • Tech, Media Cos. Must Watch DOJ's China Initiative

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's China Initiative has significant numbers of federal prosecutors and investigators focused on economic espionage, intellectual property theft and Foreign Corrupt Practices Act cases, which may have wide-ranging implications for companies in the technology, media and telecommunications space, says Brendan Quigley at Baker Botts.

  • Avoid Claims Of Bankruptcy Fraud Amid Creditor Scrutiny

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    As pandemic-induced bankruptcy filings continue to grow, debtors must be aware of the elements of bankruptcy fraud — especially since certain types of civil fraud do not require intent — as creditors are highly incentivized to analyze every official company action, say attorneys at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Mental Health Efforts Will Support Diversity In Legal Industry

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    The stigma of discussing mental health struggles during these tough times is especially profound for attorneys of racial and ethnic minorities, but law firms and in-house departments can change the narrative, says Patricia Silva at Lathrop.

  • Know The Red Flags Of Profiteering Before Buying PPE

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    Companies shopping for personal protective equipment should perform due diligence to identify contracts likely to involve corrupt payments or other unlawful activity, and be able to justify the presence, role and qualifications of both sellers and third-party participants in any deal, say attorneys at Kelley Drye.

  • How The Gov't Is Cracking Down On PPP Fraud

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    Recent charges demonstrate the U.S. Department of Justice's strong intent to claw back any loan proceeds obtained fraudulently through the CARES Act's Paycheck Protection Program, and the risks to loan borrowers are not limited to governmental prosecution, says Holly Drumheller Butler at Miles & Stockbridge.

  • Opinion

    The Remote Jury Trial Is A Bad Idea

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    The notion of holding jury trials via videoconference has been floated as a near certainty, with some jurisdictions already engaging in pilot programs, but the fundamental genius of the jury trial can only exist in a live, in-person setting, say Paula Hinton and Tom Melsheimer at Winston & Strawn.

  • Another COVID-19 Enforcement Tool: Money Laundering Law

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    As we have already seen the first pandemic-related enforcement action that includes fraud as a predicate to a money laundering charge, it is useful to understand how prosecutors may use money laundering charges to enhance their COVID-19 fraud cases, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Opinion

    Strict Liability Has No Place In 'Should Have Known' Case

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    Because the defendant in Thaddeus North v. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission was not charged on a strict liability claim, the D.C. Circuit should reject the SEC's interpretation of the compliance officer's "should have known" liability as such, say Brian Rubin and Michelle McIntyre at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Civility Could Be Litigators' New Normal Even Post-Pandemic

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    The past few months of lockdown have given rise to some profound patterns — litigators are more cooperative and less adversarial — and as the activities of courts and tribunals resume, lawyers should consider continuing to devote more time and resources to resolving disputes instead of fighting them out, says Matthew Vafidis at Holland & Knight.

  • Opinion

    Contact Tracing Shouldn't Upend 4th Amendment Protections

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    To comport with the Fourth Amendment, the proposed COVID-19 Consumer Data Protection Act — which concerns contact tracing — must explicitly prohibit the transmission of geolocation data to law enforcement and include a private right of action, says criminal defense attorney Lara Yeretsian.

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