White Collar

  • June 21, 2022

    Garland Pledges War Crimes Aid In Surprise Ukraine Visit

    Attorney General Merrick Garland made a surprise visit to Ukraine on Tuesday, tapping a federal prosecutor known for hunting down former Nazis to help Kyiv investigate Russian war criminals.

  • June 21, 2022

    Celtics Star Marcus Smart Testifies In $63M Fraud Trial

    Boston Celtics point guard Marcus Smart took the witness stand Tuesday in a $63 million insurance fraud trial, testifying that a Long Island medical biller impersonated him regarding coverage for a 2018 hand injury that nearly ended his basketball career.

  • June 21, 2022

    Once Avenatti Is Sentenced, Feds Plan To Drop Other Charges

    Now that Michael Avenatti has pled guilty to four counts of wire fraud and one of tax fraud without a plea deal, prosecutors told a California federal judge Tuesday that they plan to drop the remaining 31 charges against the disgraced attorney as soon as he is sentenced.

  • June 21, 2022

    Atty Says Feds Destroyed Evidence, Wants FCPA Case Tossed

    An attorney charged in an $84 million bribery scheme argued in Massachusetts federal court that the charge against him should be dropped on the eve of trial after the FBI destroyed evidence that could have cast doubt on his guilt and also wiped clean any record of what happened to the proof in question.

  • June 21, 2022

    Legal Aid, Private Attys Must Face Frozen Child Death Suit

    The Legal Aid Society of Suffolk County and private attorneys must answer for the death of an 8-year-old autistic boy who was left to freeze to death in a garage by his father following the mother's failed attempts to remove him from the man's custody, a Brooklyn federal judge has ruled.

  • June 21, 2022

    Fla. Lawyer Found Guilty Of Extorting Client For Cash

    Former criminal defense attorney Marion Michael O'Steen was found guilty on two charges — interfering with commerce by extortion and failing to timely file a form required for receipt of more than $10,000 — and faces up to 25 years in federal prison, the U.S. Attorney's Office of the Middle District of Florida announced Tuesday.

  • June 21, 2022

    Jan. 6 Panel Hearings Complicate Ongoing Insurrection Cases

    The House committee investigating the Capitol riot has made unlikely bedfellows of federal prosecutors and Jan. 6 defendants, with defense attorneys blasting the timing of hearings that broadcast video testimony of those still awaiting trial and the Justice Department criticizing the committee for withholding those interviews.

  • June 21, 2022

    DaVita Gets All Clear To Return No-Poach Docs

    An Illinois federal judge gave DaVita the permission it needed Monday to dispose of confidential documents produced by the U.S. Department of Justice in its failed criminal no-poach case, deeming it sufficient for follow-on civil plaintiffs that the company will return what DOJ gave it.

  • June 21, 2022

    Ex-Coach Asks To Avoid Prison After 'Varsity Blues' Testimony

    A former University of Southern California soccer coach argued Tuesday that she should avoid prison time after admitting to making fake profiles for Lori Loughlin's daughter and others as part of the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scandal and testifying during two successful prosecutions.

  • June 21, 2022

    Justices Block Inmate Transport For New Evidence

    Federal courts cannot order a state prison to transport an inmate for a medical exam the inmate hopes to use to challenge his death sentence if he hasn't already shown how the evidence would help his case, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.

  • June 21, 2022

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A flurry of new complaints from shareholders hit the Delaware Chancery Court last week, including one about an $850 million GoDaddy tax asset buyout and another about the alleged gutting of Catalyst Biosciences Inc. Rounding out the news was a Delaware Supreme Court reversal of a controversial decision about an "insolvency exception" to shareholders' votes.

  • June 21, 2022

    SEC Fines Ratings Agency, CEO $2M Over Alleged Conflicts

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday fined Egan-Jones Ratings Co. and its CEO a combined $2 million for alleged conflicts of interest, including an instance where the chief executive butted into the ratings process to award a valued client a higher rating.

  • June 21, 2022

    NFL QB Watson Settles 20 of 24 Suits, Plaintiffs' Atty Says

    Cleveland Browns quarterback Deshaun Watson has settled 20 of the 24 pending lawsuits against him from women alleging sexual assault and other inappropriate behavior during massages, the attorney representing the plaintiffs said in a statement Tuesday.

  • June 21, 2022

    High Court Won't Hear Challenge To SEC 'Gag Orders'

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to hear the case of an ex-Xerox executive who is challenging a nearly two-decade-old U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission settlement barring him from ever publicly denying the allegations against him.

  • June 21, 2022

    Glencore Unit Pleads Guilty To 7 Bribery Charges In UK

    A British subsidiary of mining giant Glencore formally pled guilty at a London court on Tuesday to seven counts of bribery in connection with its oil operations in several African countries.

  • June 17, 2022

    The Law360 400: Tracking The Largest US Law Firms

    As the legal market adjusted to pressures of a global pandemic and saw demand for complex legal services soar, many law firms spent 2021 locked in a fierce war for talent to meet ever-expanding client needs.

  • June 17, 2022

    Will BigLaw Regret Its Hiring Spree As The Economy Softens?

    The largest 200 law firms in the U.S. boosted their headcount by an average of 5.6% in 2021 — the steepest increase in five years, according to the Law360 400. Here's a look at what those numbers mean and where firms may be headed if the economy slows in the coming year.

  • June 20, 2022

    Wells Fargo To Pay $3.75M In Ponzi Scheme Class Settlement

    Wells Fargo has agreed to pay $3.75 million to put away claims from a proposed class of investors who say the bank facilitated a yearslong, $135 million Ponzi scheme through the real estate investment firm EquityBuild Inc.

  • June 20, 2022

    Filipino Community Mourns Atty After Philly Shooting

    Police are looking into the weekend shooting death of a lawyer from the Philippines during a vacation trip to Philadelphia in an incident that has left the Filipino community mourning and a mother grieving for a child she called "a good, smart, generous, loving, caring son."

  • June 17, 2022

    Ex-LA Official Took Bribes To Save Projects, Ex-Aide Testifies

    A one-time aide to former Los Angeles City Councilman Jose Huizar testified in a real estate developer's bribery trial Friday, explaining to jurors how his former boss intentionally created regulatory leverage against developers, then extracted bribes to swoop in as a "savior" and help move projects forward in his district.

  • June 17, 2022

    Ex-Rite Aid Exec To Pay $300K In SEC Insider Trading Deal

    A former Rite Aid Corp. executive who once oversaw the company's compliance with its code of ethics will pay just more than $300,000 to settle U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission allegations that he engaged in insider trading.

  • June 17, 2022

    Malta Arb. Outside Reach Of Discovery Tool, Court Hears

    A European Central Bank official argues that efforts to subpoena her in connection with a bank's claim against Malta should be quashed after a recent ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court — despite lingering questions over whether the justices' ruling applies to certain types of investor-state arbitration.

  • June 17, 2022

    Ex-Bulls Player Cops To Conspiracy In NBA Fraud Crackdown

    A former Chicago Bulls forward on Friday became the first NBA veteran in the Manhattan U.S. attorney's health plan fraud crackdown to plead out, telling a federal judge he conspired to falsely bill the league for chiropractic services.

  • June 17, 2022

    Fla. Woman Convicted In $3B Scheme To Defraud IRS

    A federal jury convicted a Florida woman Thursday of swindling the Internal Revenue Service out of nearly $6 million with a fake tax return scheme she and her husband carried out over a 10-year span that sought $3 billion in total refunds to fund a lavish lifestyle.

  • June 17, 2022

    Man Convicted Of PPP Fraud Handed 39-Month Prison Term

    The owner of a tech startup convicted at trial for lying on federal pandemic aid loan applications has been sentenced to more than three years in prison.

Expert Analysis

  • Improving Defense Case Stories In An Age Of Misinformation

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    If defense lawyers reflect on how COVID-19 misinformation permeated public discourse, they will find courtroom lessons on telling a complete, consistent and credible story that prevents jurors from filling in the blanks themselves, says David Metz​ at IMS.

  • Opinion

    Clients' Diversity Mandates For Law Firms Are Necessary

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    Coca-Cola recently scrapped its proposed diversity staffing requirements for outside counsel, and other companies may be reassessing their mandates due to external pressures, but it is important to remember the myriad factors supporting these policies and why they are more important now than ever before, says David Hopkins at Benesch Friedlander.

  • 5 Questions That Can Help Law Firms Win RFPs

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    As the volume of matter-specific requests for proposals continues to increase in the legal market, law firms can take some new steps to fine-tune their RFP response-drafting process and strategy, says Matthew Prinn at RFP Advisory Group.

  • A Guide To Nonverbal Cues As In-Person Jury Trials Resume

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    As attorneys face the prospect of trying cases in person after a two-year hiatus, they need to remember common fallacies jurors hold about detecting lies from witnesses’ body language — and lawyers must educate witnesses about demeanor that hurts credibility, says Jeff Dougherty at Litigation IQ.

  • How Law Firms Can Employ More Veterans

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    Hiring attorneys who are veterans is often overlooked in law firm diversity, equity and inclusion plans, even though it generates substantial benefits, but partnering with like-minded organizations and having a robust and active veterans group will go a long way in boosting a firm's ability to recruit and retain veterans, say Daniel Sylvester and Nicholas Hasenfus at Holland & Knight.

  • Associates, Look Beyond Money In Assessing Lateral Offers

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    In the face of high demand for corporate legal work and persistent staffing constraints, many law firms continue to offer sizable signing bonuses to new associates, but lateral candidates should remember that money is just one component of what should be a much broader assessment, says Stephanie Ruiter at Lateral Link.

  • Preventing Impermissible Client Solicitation After ABA Opinion

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    Following the American Bar Association's recent opinion on the limitations on client solicitation, attorneys at Harris Wiltshire examine the principal rules that govern a lawyer's ethical duties with respect to solicitation, explain how those rules vary by jurisdiction, and provide some practical tips for ensuring compliance.

  • Opinion

    High Court Should Reject Okla. Jurisdiction In Indian Country

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    In Oklahoma v. Castro-Huerta at the U.S. Supreme Court, the state is arguing that it should be able to prosecute non-Native Americans for crimes committed in Indian Country, but that is directly at odds with the court's 2020 decision in McGirt v. Oklahoma, and would reverse a matter that has been well-established in statutes and case law, says Terry Campo at The Campo Group.

  • Lessons On Avoiding E-Discovery Violations And Sanctions

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    Michael Fox and David Cohen at Reed Smith discuss how counsel can assist their clients in meeting preservation obligations for electronically stored information in light of recent federal rulings on spoliation sanctions motions for possible violations of this duty.

  • Collaborative Tech Will Dictate Future Law Firm Success

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    Law firms need to shift their focus from solving the needs of their lawyers with siloed solutions to implementing collaboration technology, thereby enabling more seamless workflows and team experiences amid widespread embrace of hybrid and remote work models, says Kate Jasaitis at HBR Consulting.

  • Top Enforcement Trends For Health Providers To Consider

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    A review of the U.S. Department of Justice's recent priorities and resolutions, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' advisory opinions, illuminates trends that may inspire updates to health care providers' compliance programs, say Stacy Gerber Ward and Aaron Smith at von Briesen & Roper.

  • How To Effectively Prepare A Witness For Remote Testimony

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    Many of the lessons taught in an introductory theater performance class can provide foundational guidelines for virtual witness preparation, including the importance of props, proper lighting and wardrobe decisions, and of acknowledging that the star of your show is not a Zoom expert, say Hailey Drescher at Trask Consulting and Michael Thomas at Foley & Lardner.

  • As Cyber Risks Surge, Remember Attorneys' Ethical Duties

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    The prevalence of remote work and a greater threat of Russian cyberattacks should serve as a stark reminder of a lawyer's professional obligations to guard against unauthorized disclosure of client information and to protect client interests in the event of a cyberattack, says Alvin Mathews at Ulmer & Berne.

  • Opinion

    Rule 702 Proposal Would Bring Clarity To Expert Admissibility

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    Proposed amendments to Federal Rule of Evidence 702 will, if approved, clarify the standards governing admissibility of expert testimony in criminal and civil cases, minimize the potential that a jury is swayed by unreliable testimony, and establish courts as gatekeepers, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • Rethinking E-Discovery Readiness Amid Rise Of Collab Tools

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    Online collaboration platforms and instant messaging tools are quickly becoming the primary mode of internal business communications, leading to disputes around discoverability of data on these platforms and underscoring the need for new preservation processes to ensure compliance with discovery obligations, say Jay Carle and Ryan Tilot at Seyfarth.

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