5 Most-Read Access To Justice Law360 Guests Of 2019

By Guest Contributors | December 23, 2019, 6:18 PM EST

What access to justice topics piqued reader interest in 2019? Take a look back at the year's most-read articles from Access to Justice Law360 guest authors.





Aug. 15, 2019
What You Should Know About Courtroom Closures
At attorney Greg Craig’s trial in D.C. federal court this week, the courtroom was cleared so prospective jurors could answer sensitive questions. Even seasoned litigators were left wondering about the nature of this subtle, yet significant, issue involving Sixth Amendment public trial rights, says Luke Cass at Quarles & Brady.


Aug. 18, 2019
Electronic Monitoring Technology Must Be Regulated
Based on my research into the electronic monitoring technologies that are increasingly becoming part of the criminal justice system, it is clear that they must be regulated, just as medical devices are, says Shubha Balasubramanyam of the Center for Court Innovation.


June 7, 2019
Does Multidistrict Litigation Deny Plaintiffs Due Process?
Judges in multidistrict litigation consistently appoint lead plaintiffs lawyers based on their experience, war chests and ability to get along with everyone. But evidence suggests that these repeat players often make deals riddled with self-interest and provisions that goad plaintiffs into settling, says Elizabeth Chamblee Burch of the University of Georgia School of Law.

July 19, 2019
Risk Assessment Tools Are Not A Failed "Minority Report"
Contrary to Wednesday's op-ed in the New York Times, which refers to pretrial risk assessment tools as "a real-world 'Minority Report'" that doesn't work, these tools and the promise they hold to improve judges’ and magistrates’ decision-making processes should not be dismissed simply because they aren’t yet perfect, say professors at North Carolina State University and Duke University.

Sept. 3, 2019
Rules Of Evidence Hinder #MeToo Claims In Court
If women and men who bring sexual harassment allegations in court will ever have a level playing field with their alleged harassers, the rules regarding what evidence is relevant in a sexual harassment trial must be changed, says John Winer at Winer Burritt.






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