Access to Justice

  • April 14, 2019

    DOJ Called Out For Protecting Corrupt Prosecutors

    The U.S. Department of Justice should end the secrecy surrounding federal prosecutors who commit misconduct and make their names public, a libertarian scholar said in discussing a new documentary screened at the Heritage Foundation on Thursday.

  • April 14, 2019

    Migrants' Fate Unclear Amid 'Remain In Mexico' Turmoil

    President Donald Trump’s “Remain in Mexico” policy all but assured that migrants would not have access to the legal counsel necessary to bolster their asylum claims, but even after a California federal court froze the policy, it is not clear what will happen to those who were affected, attorneys said.

  • April 14, 2019

    Katten Helps Abandoned Girl Reach New Family

    When a baby girl abandoned on a roadway near Los Angeles three years ago was adopted by a relative in recent months, it came with the help of a Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP associate who worked pro bono to guide the family through a delicate legal process.

  • April 14, 2019

    Closing Housing Justice Gap Needs More Than Lawyers

    A daunting justice gap facing low-income people threatened with home evictions demands a “wrap around” response by volunteer lawyers backed by social services and other kinds of assistance, pro bono advocates said Tuesday.

  • April 7, 2019

    Senate Hurdle Looms As House Advances VAWA Reforms

    The Violence Against Women Act hangs in legislative limbo after reforms that passed the House of Representatives last week met with a frosty reception in the Senate.

  • April 7, 2019

    Amid Pushback, NY Bolsters New Tool To Police Prosecutors

    Supporters of a New York panel for investigating prosecutor misconduct say threats by state district attorneys to derail the effort forced lawmakers to put the underlying legislation under an unusual level of scrutiny — and design an even better tool for policing prosecutors in the process.

  • April 7, 2019

    Squire Patton Boggs Foundation Unveils Puerto Rico Initiative

    As Puerto Rico struggles to recover from Hurricane Maria, the Squire Patton Boggs Foundation is launching a new fellowship program to help residents get the legal assistance they need.

  • April 7, 2019

    Is Criminal Justice Reform Working In NJ?

    The fallout from New Jersey all but eliminating cash bail in 2017 continues to transition from speculation to hard numbers, as state officials last week released statistics demonstrating that the percentage of those released without posting bail who skipped their hearings or committed another offense remained virtually unchanged.

  • April 7, 2019

    Amnesty Days: Short Term Fixes For Long Term Problems

    Amnesty days for those with outstanding arrest warrants can help local and state courts tackle problems like dire case backlogs, overpopulated jails and ever-climbing sums of uncollected debt, but even proponents of the practice agree it’s a bandaid for systemic flaws best addressed by lawmakers.

  • April 7, 2019

    Lisa Foster On The Impact Of Court Fines And Fees

    After a decade as a California state court judge, Lisa Foster is using that experience to reform an often-overlooked aspect of the criminal justice system: fines and court fees, and the outsized impact they can have on indigent defendants.

  • April 7, 2019

    Ga. Case Won't Be Justices' Last Chance On Bail Reform

    While the U.S. Supreme Court recently rejected a case challenging a Georgia town's policy to wait up to two days before offering arrestees a chance to prove they can't afford bail, a growing split among appellate courts could pressure the justices to tackle wealth-based detention in the near future.

  • March 31, 2019

    Violence Against Women Reforms Face Uncertain Road Ahead

    Efforts to reform the federal law that provides funding for programs targeting violence against women have sparked debate on sensitive social issues, including protections for LGBTQ Americans and gun rights. With a vote on House legislation looming this week, it’s unclear where Congress will find common ground.

  • March 31, 2019

    How A DLA Piper Help Desk Is Aiding Tenants Facing Eviction

    A help desk started by DLA Piper in Chicago eviction court guides tenants through what can be an unfamiliar and confusing legal process, working to make sure people walk away with better outcomes and no black marks on their record.

  • March 31, 2019

    NJ Hardens Link Between Legal Weed And Clean Slates

    Tens of thousands of New Jerseyans could benefit from expungement provisions included in the state’s bill to legalize and regulate adult-use cannabis in what’s become the latest example of how the national discussion around legalization has offered important inroads for advocates of clean slate reforms.

  • March 31, 2019

    Calif. Justices Back Right To Counsel In Prosecutor's Appeal

    An indigent woman accused of driving under the influence won her case at the trial level after a California public defender got key evidence thrown out. When prosecutors appealed the evidence issue, an important question emerged: Did Rosa Lopez have the right to court-appointed counsel on a pre-trial appeal?

  • March 31, 2019

    Research Boosts Push For Automatic Expungements

    Like most other states that allow people to clear their criminal records, Michigan imposes strict eligibility restrictions and requires former offenders to navigate a complex legal process. But newly published research out of the Wolverine state provides fuel for an ongoing national movement to make the process more accessible by automating expungements.

  • March 24, 2019

    Justices’ Juror Strike Questions Bode Well For Curtis Flowers

    Over 200 people lined up outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday to hear oral arguments in a high-profile case that’s spanned six capital murder trials and centers on one crucial question: How much should a prosecutor’s history matter when the other side alleges racial bias affected jury selection?

  • March 24, 2019

    Talking Restorative Justice With Lara Bazelon

    The author of a new book on wrongful convictions discusses how the current justice system of crime and punishment could be reframed to focus on harm and healing.

  • March 24, 2019

    Okla. Accused Of Running Unconstitutional Debtors' Prisons

    The idea of a debtors’ prison conjures grainy images of another time and place, but three individuals in Oklahoma who are struggling to put food on the table say their state has effectively revived the practice — incarcerating them because they failed to keep up with thousands of dollars in court-ordered fines and fees.

  • March 24, 2019

    High Court Could Soon End Split Jury Convictions For Good

    In taking up a Louisiana man’s challenge to his murder conviction, the U.S. Supreme Court could be on the verge of banning the conviction of defendants in state courts based on nonunanimous juries, an increasingly rare practice many argue is rooted in discrimination.

  • March 24, 2019

    Will Congress Heed Trump’s Call To Nix Legal Aid Funder?

    For the third year in a row, President Donald Trump’s annual budget calls for the elimination of the Legal Services Corp., but advocates for America’s largest single funder of legal aid services remain hopeful that lawmakers will again rebuff that recommendation.

  • March 24, 2019

    After Google Ruling, Legal Aid Groups In No Mood To Cheer

    Legal aid groups may have dodged a challenge to a source of important funding when the U.S. Supreme Court this week kicked questions surrounding a class action settlement with Google back to the lower courts, but there were no sighs of relief.

  • March 24, 2019

    DC Circ. Dissects Atty Fee Ruling That Stoked Access Fears

    A D.C. Circuit panel has raised concerns with a survey of lawyers’ rates that a lower court used to pare millions from an attorney fee award in a decision that legal aid and public interest groups fear may undercut their fee awards and ultimately reduce the number of clients they can take on.

  • March 17, 2019

    Tenant Access To Eviction Counsel Gains Steam In Philly

    After spending two years providing low-income tenants facing possible eviction with pro bono legal representation, Philadelphia's mayor and City Council are taking steps to make the pilot program permanent.

  • March 17, 2019

    Epstein Case Gives Victims’ Rights A Defining Moment

    A blockbuster decision last month that a secret non-prosecution deal between the government and a millionaire sex offender violated the Crime Victims Rights Act highlights the importance of making sure victims have a seat at the table, experts say.

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